mark poulson

air brush nozzel question

10 posts in this topic

Some brushes, especially the knock offs, come with a nozzle that's cut with four triangular cuts.

What do the cuts do, other than making back flushing more difficult?

P.S I can spell, but, obviously, I can't type.

Nozzle, nozzle, nozzle........

Edited by mark poulson

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Look spiffy? "Aerate the tip"? Use the tip as a Popeil Pocket Julienne tool to carve radishes into those little flower thingies?

I was thinking it let you see whether the tip of the needle was accumulating dried paint while at the same time affording it some protection. Like you, I prefer a solid end cap that you can cover with a finger tip to backwash the brush.

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Who knows Mark, I always thought it might be to decrease the vacuum at the rear of the tip so it would be less likely to have paint build up here ???????????? anyway it's good to hold the tube and aerate while spatter painting.pete

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I have an old badger 150 and it has holes in the air cap but my new one has v cuts and not holes. On my old one it use to get a build up near the end and the new one does not do that. But my thinking is that it is easier to make v cuts than bore 4 holes. Bean counters way of saving money. As for choking the gun use a rag on the tip instead of your fingers. Just my :twocents:

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Pete,

That makes sense. I'd never thought about the vortices involved (that's for you, Dave), or the low pressure/vacuum that the moving air and paint would generate. Doh!!! :oooh:

How do you get the tip to spatter when you want it to, instead of when it wants to?

Frank,

The rag is a good idea. I've been pinching it with my latex gloved fingers, and twisting until it backflushes. The rag sounds much easier.

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I believe its known as a "crown cap"....maybe because it would resemble a crown if you unscrewed it and held it upright.....lol...I dunno.

From what I understand its purpose is two fold.....first it allows air to escape to the sides when doing detail work which allows you to get closer to the surface of whatever it is your painting but still have protection for the needle....For really close detail work you'll usually remove the crown cap all together which allows you to get better detail, but leaves the tip of the needle exposed to damage.....Second purpose, is basicly what Pete said...cuts down on the paint drying in that area.

For splatters I always use the old popcicle stick application method.:yay:

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68KingFisher,

Do you mean the old Willie Nelson casting method, from "Gone Fishing"?

"Dip, and flick". :lol:

Seriously, thanks for the nozzle info.

It's a luxury having someone like you on this site who is so knowledgeable. :worship:

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The popsicle splatter technique I mentioned is as simple as it sounds....you take a popsicle stick and hold just in front of your airbrush tip and start spraying paint onto the stick.....as the paint builds up it begins to blow off the end of the stick and creates a splatter design onto whatever your painting....with a bit of practice you can adjust the splatters to suit your likes....from a tiny pattern to much larger droplets....Once you try this you'll see what I mean.

I appreciate the kudos Mark.....I really want to help you guys with your airbrush struggles without coming across as a "know it all". I remember what it was like when I started airbrushing and had no outside help...it was more than frustrating to say the least....if I can help you guys avoid some of that I want too.....Keep asking the questions, I don't mind sharing what I know.

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Mark- it's like Matt (Rookie says) you blow it through a McDonalds straw <_< Well nearly --- I have been playing with this for a while and am used to it , but if I were you I would experiment a bit first.

Just get a piece of plastic tubing that fits snug over your A/B cap. I have used all sorts of tube but silicone is best as it will stretch a bit - cut it about 3/4" long and make sure the end (outside end) is square. Water down your paint to about the consistency of 'skim milk' and blast away, you get a pretty even coat of dots - BUT the thicker the paint the more inconsistent the dots, which go from specks to blobs.

Coincidently I was using this technique today spraying a rod blank and it turned out all right (so far)- When you are finished, clean the tube and stick it in a safe place (amongst all the other junk on your bench!!) for your next painting adventure. pete

Pete,

That makes sense. I'd never thought about the vortices involved (that's for you, Dave), or the low pressure/vacuum that the moving air and paint would generate. Doh!!! :oooh:

How do you get the tip to spatter when you want it to, instead of when it wants to?

Frank,

The rag is a good idea. I've been pinching it with my latex gloved fingers, and twisting until it backflushes. The rag sounds much easier.

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Mark- it's like Matt (Rookie says) you blow it through a McDonalds straw <_< Well nearly --- I have been playing with this for a while and am used to it , but if I were you I would experiment a bit first.

Just get a piece of plastic tubing that fits snug over your A/B cap. I have used all sorts of tube but silicone is best as it will stretch a bit - cut it about 3/4" long and make sure the end (outside end) is square. Water down your paint to about the consistency of 'skim milk' and blast away, you get a pretty even coat of dots - BUT the thicker the paint the more inconsistent the dots, which go from specks to blobs.

Coincidently I was using this technique today spraying a rod blank and it turned out all right (so far)- When you are finished, clean the tube and stick it in a safe place (amongst all the other junk on your bench!!) for your next painting adventure. pete

68KingFisher,

That sounds like an interesting method. I'll give it a try.

Pete,

You know I'm always "ascared" to try anything the Rookie recommends, but I'll give this one a go, too. ;)

Thanks for both of the tips.

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