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cwillis999

Jointed Jerk Bait

8 posts in this topic

cwillis999    10

First off I just want to say thank you to all the regulars who make this forum as great as it is. Tackle making has become my new obsession because of you :lol: Recently I have atempted to craft a 2 piece jointed jerk bait using the screw eye & pin joint design with a "V" cut. My concern is the wear of the joint and the gumming of the two parts rubbing together. To avoid to much gumming i avoided the E-tex top coat in the joint itself. I layered coatings in this order. linseed oil, krylon primer, 3 coats of minwax polycrylic, metalic paint, gift tissue wrap w/ print, one more coat of polycrylic, Black air brush stripe on top and white on the bottom, then a coat of etex partialy on the male end of the joint but none in the female end. I am not sure if this is the best method as I'm not to confidant in the polycrylic as a sealer but it is the only way I can think of to avoid the gumming mentioned above. I also used some very small washers i bought at lowes on the top and bottom of the screw eye, however they are a little to big and stick out of the joint. I was thinking about making my own washers out of sheet aluminum or stainless steal. What do you guys think would work better s/s or alum? Or do you have any other suggestions for the washers? How do you go about creating a 2 piece joint jerk bait?

washer.jpg

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.dsaavedra.    10

i think you did a lot more than you needed. all you need to do for a jointed bait is carve the bait, seal the wood (polyacrylic would work for this stage only), prime it, apply your paint/photofinish/whatever, coat the entire bait in your e-tex, and be done. if you are doing a photofinish and you wish to put on the foil and then etex and then paint ontop of etex (for a smoother transition) then you'd need another coat of etex over the paint. hope all that made a little bit of sense.

i don't know what "gumming" you're referring to, but as long as you seal, paint/foil, and put a good topcoat (etex) over the entire thing, you will be good. also no need for washers.

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BobP    834

One problem with epoxy is that it draws away from a sharp edge while curing. That makes sharp edges on a joint susceptible to finish failure. The epoxy LOOKS OK but is actually paper thin. Sand the edges to a radius if you use epoxy. I'm not sure of the function of washers in a joint, but if the metal doesn't have to be thick, you can cut them out of a soft drink can easily with regular scissors.

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cwillis999    10

One problem with epoxy is that it draws away from a sharp edge while curing. That makes sharp edges on a joint susceptible to finish failure. The epoxy LOOKS OK but is actually paper thin. Sand the edges to a radius if you use epoxy. I'm not sure of the function of washers in a joint, but if the metal doesn't have to be thick, you can cut them out of a soft drink can easily with regular scissors.

I'm only using one screw eye for my jointed baits so my thoughts on the washers is to eliminate the screw eye from wearing down the inside of the joint. Again I may be over killing the washer/wear issue but I did notice that it helped the joint move more freely so I think I'm going to stick with the washers. The soda can idea is great, Thank you! I'm going to try that out. Here is a post [<--mouse over] where Jamie used some beads as washers which doubled as a swivil. Seems like this would work best but I don't use two screws eyes. Two beads in one slot would be a bit much I think. Just for reference here is another post [<--mouse over] about problems persisting to epoxy in the joints.

P.S. sorry about the bad picture i need to find a good digital camera. How many mega pixils do i need to take good close ups of my tackle?

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mark poulson    1,700

I'm only using one screw eye for my jointed baits so my thoughts on the washers is to eliminate the screw eye from wearing down the inside of the joint. Again I may be over killing the washer/wear issue but I did notice that it helped the joint move more freely so I think I'm going to stick with the washers. The soda can idea is great, Thank you! I'm going to try that out. Here is a post [<--mouse over] where Jamie used some beads as washers which doubled as a swivil. Seems like this would work best but I don't use two screws eyes. Two beads in one slot would be a bit much I think. Just for reference here is another post [<--mouse over] about problems persisting to epoxy in the joints.

P.S. sorry about the bad picture i need to find a good digital camera. How many mega pixils do i need to take good close ups of my tackle?

Try taking the lure apart, coating the insides of the joint, both male and female, with D2T, lapping it up onto the faces of the lure a little for a good lap joint. Then, after that epoxy has set, reassemble the lure, put it on your lure turner, coat it with Etex, and turn it 'till it's set.

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As was mentioned earlier when makeing jointed baits i also try not to have sharp edges and when epoxying i do the bait in 2 halves and instead of putting it on the wheel to cure i hold the baits in mole grips and turn the baits by hand this way i can control the e-tex so ensuring i get a good coat around the v joint area especially on the female side of the joint.

You don't have to turn constantly every 20 minutes or so is fine spome will drip off but you can get a thicker coat in the areas you want it

Edited by BEZYB

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