castmaster

Help! Problem With Ink Running Under Polyurethane Topcoat

9 posts in this topic

Each year I do a limited edition numbered run of Musky topwater lures and always sign and 3 them with a gold Pilot ink/paint pen(one of the ones where you have to shake it up some and then depress the tip 3-4 times to start the ink flowing)

In the past I used D2T for a topcoat but have since switched to dipping in polyurethane. Now the lettering on some of the test lures is running from the poly, while other test lures are jsut fine. All were lettered at the same time so have had the same amount of drying time.

Has anyone else had a problem with Pilot pen running when dipping in poly? Does anyone know of a way to seal the lettering that wont make it run and will be compatible with the poly topcoat?

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@ castmaster

Not quite sure , whether I have used polyurethane before as a topcoat , but I've had same problem before with some other types of topcoat like PUR-laquer(probably the same stuff) , two component automotive laquer , modelling dope and some kinds of epoxy .

As I am really fed up of these issues , I always cover my lures with acrylic clear paint twice prior to putting on the "real" topcoat .

Sometimes some of those clears would also dissolve my paintjobs(certain paint types) or the black center dots of "nightglow" lure eyes .

If you only need to protect your signature , paint only this one over with acrylic clear , ......you might also try to apply a piece of transparent(fingerprint-free :lol: )tape onto the writing , it should not be visible under the final thick clearcoat anymore .

good luck , diemai :yay:

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castmaster,

I have been using a one pack polyurethane of late and have had similar problems while dipping. I wanted to dip for the convenience, however, was having all sorts of problems even after attempting to heat set the paint. I have previously sprayed on my top coats before trying the single pack and ended up going back to that (spraying that is) in order to seal the bait first. Spraying doesnt run any of the paint in my experience provided the coat is only light.

I leave that for 24hrs and then dip for the second coat and have not had any running since.

Angus

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Mcleod,

You were on the right track; however, attempting to heat set sounds as though you were not sure how far to go with the heat-setting. Because you didn't get the results you'd hoped for, and assuming you were using a clear acrylic like Createx which responds to heat-setting, you didn't go far enough, either with the temperature, duration, or most likely both. I seal Sharpie all the time with Createx, using both clear and transparent colors and then coating with Dicknite's topcoat which utilizes a solvent catalyst, and sufficient heat setting must take place for this system to work. Insufficient heat-setting results in smeared paint jobs and signatures.

Dean

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Solvent based topcoat causes Sharpie or similar writing to run if the topcoat moves/flows after application. You find that out when you switch from epoxy to polyurethane topcoats. 2 easy options. Cover the writing with clear acrylic paint before you topcoat, or switch to a water based pen. I had the same problem and stopped in a hobby shop and bought a fine tip calligraphy pen for about $2. It's basically a plastic stick with an old style fountain pen tip attached. Dip it in Createx black paint and away you go. I paint the lure's black eye dots and kill spots as a last step before topcoating, so dipping the pen in the same few drops of Createx black at the same time is a "natural".

Edited by BobP

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Solvent based topcoat causes Sharpie or similar writing to run if the topcoat moves/flows after application. You find that out when you switch from epoxy to polyurethane topcoats. 2 easy options. Cover the writing with clear acrylic paint before you topcoat, or switch to a water based pen. I had the same problem and stopped in a hobby shop and bought a fine tip calligraphy pen for about $2. It's basically a plastic stick with an old style fountain pen tip attached. Dip it in Createx black paint and away you go. I paint the lure's black eye dots and kill spots as a last step before topcoating, so dipping the pen in the same few drops of Createx black at the same time is a "natural".

Bob,

Do you think dipping in water based Polyurethane instead of oil based Poly would make any difference? Baits are painted with Createx and Auto Air.

I've only used Createx and Auto Air paints, what would be a brand of clear acrylic that should be compatible with those that I could spray over the lettering?

Thanks!

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Mcleod,

You were on the right track; however, attempting to heat set sounds as though you were not sure how far to go with the heat-setting. Because you didn't get the results you'd hoped for, and assuming you were using a clear acrylic like Createx which responds to heat-setting, you didn't go far enough, either with the temperature, duration, or most likely both. I seal Sharpie all the time with Createx, using both clear and transparent colors and then coating with Dicknite's topcoat which utilizes a solvent catalyst, and sufficient heat setting must take place for this system to work. Insufficient heat-setting results in smeared paint jobs and signatures.

Dean

Dean,

I am sure you are correct. I dont use createx, I use solvent based automotive paint, however, I am sure that more heat setting can be applied. It is just a matter of trial and error for me. In the short term spraying the topcoat stops the smear and lets me test and learn other things with my crankbaits.

Angus

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I use a Sharpie's (extra fine, ultra fine, or fine) bolder line for adding lure details, and thus the protective coating, but for no-hassle signatures, I use a ZIG MILLENNIUM in pure black which, like the Sakura, is also a pigment ink, archival quality, not-bleeding, waterproof,etc. Dicknite's topcoat doesn't affect it at all, and I brush mine on.

The ZIG MILLENNUIM is just another pen you may run into out there in office supply-land, that works as well as the Sakura.

Dean

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