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BigBaitkid

In What Order?

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I am working a small wakebait and I am confused as to what order I should put the epoxy & paint. The way I planned on doing it was putting thinned expoxy first, then put another layer to seal the bait and once I did that I would put my first layers of paint. I am a newby and have no experience what so ever painting so if I got something wrong please point it out!

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There's no rule about how many coats of thinned epoxy to use before painting; I let it cure hard, sand out any rough areas and then decide if a second coat is needed to make the bait smooth before painting. If there are any areas where you sanded the first coat down to bare wood, use a 2nd coat. Bottom line, for best appearance and protection, you want a smooth hard surface to paint, and epoxy is a good way to get it.

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You also need to know what your lure will finally be, a floating or a sinking one. Since you say your wakebait is small, a second coat of epoxy for the sealing, together with the final coat of epoxy, may make the difference between floating and sinking. But it also depends on other factors, wood density, weight, etc.

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If you're making it out of wood, water intrusion is the biggest challenge you'll face.

If it has a lip, sealing the lip slot with somethin like runny crazy glue before you insert the lip is critical.

Also, predrill the holes for the hook hangers and line tie, run your screw eyes in and out, and then put a drop of crazy glue into the hole, and onto the screw shaft, and run them back in, to make sure the wood in the holes is sealed.

Like Rofish said, weight can be an issue for buoyancy.

If the wood you're using is balsa, you can seal the whole bait with two coats of crazy glue. It's lighter than epoxy, and strong.

I don't recommend it for multi piece lures, or lure that will be eaten by fish with bid teeth. But for bass it's fine.

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If you're making it out of wood, water intrusion is the biggest challenge you'll face.

If it has a lip, sealing the lip slot with somethin like runny crazy glue before you insert the lip is critical.

Also, predrill the holes for the hook hangers and line tie, run your screw eyes in and out, and then put a drop of crazy glue into the hole, and onto the screw shaft, and run them back in, to make sure the wood in the holes is sealed.

Like Rofish said, weight can be an issue for buoyancy.

If the wood you're using is balsa, you can seal the whole bait with two coats of crazy glue. It's lighter than epoxy, and strong.

I don't recommend it for multi piece lures, or lure that will be eaten by fish with bid teeth. But for bass it's fine.

Its made out of poplar but Its gonna be a floater . I'll post some pics up when I'm done.

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Its made out of poplar but Its gonna be a floater . I'll post some pics up when I'm done.

I also got a question what epoxy do you guys use to seal a bait? I was thinking of using 2 ton devcon but wasn't sure if it would be too thick.

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