Marlake

The Waiting Game

8 posts in this topic

Got a few baits carved , sanded, and ballasted which went fairly well for a rookie. Now I seal and wait, seal again and wait, prime coat and wait, base coat and wait, etc. etc. etc.

I get all fired up to go work on my baits, spray on a coat of something and I'm back upstairs in 15 minutes. Now I wait until the next day to take the next step in the process.

I need a hobby that keeps me occupied for a longer period of time. What can or should I be doing during downtime?

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Making crankbaits will teach you patience for sure! There are some things you can do to speed things up a little. Use epoxy thinned with lacquer thinner to undercoat/prime the bait and you only need to wait once before painting. If you use acrylic latex like Polytranspar Superhide White to color basecoat, you also don't have to wait - just dry it with a hair dryer and continue painting with acrylic colors. Dry each color with a hair dryer after you shoot it and when you're finished painting the colors, you're ready to do the eyes and topcoat the bait. Or you can use solvent based coatings and wait wait wait.

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Try staging different steps with several different baits. Sometimes I will have cranks, gliders and inline spinners going at the same time. I work on different baits during down times.

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All been there.....

Try splitting up your batches, in other words, if you carve up 20 baits, push your first run of 5, when you get to a bottleneck in your process and find yourself in a holding pattern, pull another batch of 5 and so-on for the next batch.

This happens more than you think, pre-planning is key.

Example: When I first started prototyping soft baits with polymer clay, I always hated waiting 15 minutes to bake/cure...... sculpt a gill....bake 15 minutes..... sculpt an eye socket...bake 15 minutes..... <_<

Now when I prototype, I have at least 3 designs ready to sculpt, that way when one is curing, I have at least 2 others to cycle thru.

Try instituting that workflow, and you'll spend more productive & enjoyable time in the shop.

Good luck w it.

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Try staging different steps with several different baits. Sometimes I will have cranks, gliders and inline spinners going at the same time. I work on different baits during down times.

Jaime.... we posted a min apart, precisely....

Like these guys said, there's merit in trying efficient products, but when you cant shave time that way, try working in batches.

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If you use acrylic latex like Polytranspar Superhide White to color basecoat, you also don't have to wait - just dry it with a hair dryer and continue painting with acrylic colors. Dry each color with a hair dryer after you shoot it and when you're finished painting the colors, you're ready to do the eyes and topcoat the bait. Or you can use solvent based coatings and wait wait wait.

Bob.....no disrespect, but can you explain that one to me?

Not trying to pick a fight here, but from my experience, urethanes are much faster than acrylics. Dry faster with no heat setting, and the clean up more easily.

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I was referring to undercoating and priming with solvent based products, not to lacquer versus acrylic paint. Sorry I didn't make that clear.... I don't paint with lacquer so wasn't thinking in that direction.

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