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nitro98

Making Hard Swimbaits

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I am somewhat new to tackle making. Ive gotten painting and jig pouring down. Right now I am looking to start making my own hard swimbaits. I do not want to make these out of wood although i do have a wood protype that I am working on. I just feel like i cant get the detail i want out of a wood bait. Im curious as to where to get started. What type of resin should I use to make the body segments? What type of mold would work best? Any help is greatly appreciated.

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I am somewhat new to tackle making. Ive gotten painting and jig pouring down. Right now I am looking to start making my own hard swimbaits. I do not want to make these out of wood although i do have a wood protype that I am working on. I just feel like i cant get the detail i want out of a wood bait. Im curious as to where to get started. What type of resin should I use to make the body segments? What type of mold would work best? Any help is greatly appreciated.

you can get the detail that you want out of wood even more so then you think. Me, i became proficient with wooden baits first, and creating detail on the wooden lures will definetely give you the experience that you need when making swimbaits and also if this wooden swimbait is your first you should probably make sure that it swims correctly long before the thought of making baits out of plastics enters your mind. Also when you are talking about detail do mean like scales and what not or eye sockets, gill plates, fins? if you cant do detail on a wooden bait then you must not be a very patient person or willing to take the necessary amount of time. But don't get me wrong i am just letting you know my opinion and i am not discouraging you in any way i know may come out like that, but its just food for thought. more like constructive criticism. There are woods out there that are very easy to create detail in if that is your main focus for these baits but also swimbaits are basically trail and error. The wood that i use is white pine cedar.

Edited by DeltaMan

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Deltaman's right. White pine is a great wood to carve, especially if you're making a prototype. And you can fix mistakes with bondo.

Sharp tools and light pressure are the key to good carving. Don't try to do it all at once. And put something on your leg for protection when you carve. I use my left thigh as a base for carving, so I drape a doubled towel over it. One slip can ruin your day.

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Not really trying to be a smart alec, but isn't white pine and cedar 2 different types of wood? Which is really better??

Tony

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