pikeman

Drying Wheel

7 posts in this topic

Sorry because I don't have too much time to look thru the archives.

I have this crazy idea of an extensible drying wheel, and I had a recent discussion with a friend in which he said to me that he thinks it is better to place the lures in such way as when they are spinning the epoxy resin to level equaly from the tail to the front of the lure instead of back-to-belly.

So...which way is better?

Vman .... help :rolleyes:

drying wheel.jpg

drying wheel.jpg

drying wheel.jpg

drying wheel.jpg

drying wheel.jpg

drying wheel.jpg

drying wheel.jpg

drying wheel.jpg

post-14386-126348682154_thumb.jpg

Edited by pikeman

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My lure turner turns the baits "back-to-belly" and have had no problems. I also built my turner so it could be extended, but in a different way than what your picture shows. I used a piece of 3/8" all thread rod with nuts and washers securing the wooden discs the lures are attached to. All I have to do to change the spacing is loosen a couple of nuts, move the discs and tighten the nuts again. There are small eye bolts screwed into the wooden discs to attach the lures to. Wire "S" hooks are hooked into the line tie and rear hook hanger of the bait to hook them into the eye bolts. I also use rubber bands to secure one end of the baits to the eye bolts. This allows even more versatility in the lengths of baits that can be turned without having to make adjustments to the lure turner.

Ben

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Thanks Ben,

I should have put the problem in another way:

Is there a difference between back-to-belly and front-to-tail turn, in leveling? By this I mean for the edges of the lure :)

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here's a link to a thread from last monthdrying wheel in it's a picture of my wheel,the left hand wheel is fixed to the shaft and the right hand wheel slides and will take baits up to 12 inch's.

I used to turn baits end over end but found that the epoxy would build up at the end furthest from the wheel so i now turn them belly over belly

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I can't tell you whether one way is better than the other as I have only turned lures back to belly. All I know is that I have had no problems with the top coat when turning lures in this manner. Sorry I couldn't be of more help.

Ben

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How many threads about lure turners do we have on TU?

Pikeman, I think you waste time, putting your head to work about a false problem. It is obvious to me that head to tail rotation of the lure should be avoided. Let's put it this way: in such a case, epoxy would have the possibility to travel a longer distance until it "settles down". And it could gather around more in some areas compared to others.

So belly to top rotation is the one to choose (JMHO).

But further on, there might be a problem about which nobody seems to care. I have seen big wheels, with 2 rows (maybe 3 sometimes) of attaching points. These rows are in fact circles. This kind of big wheel should be avoided. The further the lure is situated from the shaft axis, the best chances you have that the epoxy sets unevenly.

Theoretically, the best lure turner has only one lure to rotate, and that lure is situated in line with the shaft of the motor (like in the case of a single lure which you would clamp into a hand drilling machine).

But nobody would like to have a turner designed to turn a single lure at a time. So you must choose a compromise. I think that between the 2 wheels of the turner you should attach 3, maximum 4 lures, as close to the shaft as possible. And if you need more than that, I think you should attach a third wheel, in line with the other 2.

By the way, your drawing should be understood as having the shaft all the way between the 2 discs, I think. The second disc will not be driven by the first one, through the lures you will attach in between. (Pardon my ignorance in technical drawing).

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Hi Rofish,

glad to see that you are still around here.

Actually I had troubles with devcon creating waves on flat sided lures that required a second layer for evenly curing. I didn't used a turner yet so I thought it would be usefull to build one to see the difference.

As you stated the centrifugal acceleration will have a greater impact on lures situated further from the shaft axis as a calculation between the radius of the wheel and the speed of the motor. But this wil not be a great concern over a drying wheel due to a rather small speed 1.5 - 6 rpm.

The shaft is indeed split in two and it is not a precise drawing because I intend to use two shafts. One like that in the picture for placing a long heavy lure directly on it. And another one going thru both wheels for smaller lures.

Thanks for all the answers,

Pike

Edited by pikeman

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