finlander

Rotissiere Motor Vs. Microwave Motor

6 posts in this topic

Rotissiere is made for endurance, but it has this hesitation. I have solved the Etex collecting on the belly of my baits, methinks, but now it is on the lip. I can wait abit til it thickens more I guess. But will a microwave motor work for hours on end til the epoxy sets? Who has tried both? Has anyone burned up a microwave motor/do they hesitate any once turned on their sides to operate? Thanks.

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The rotisserie motor I used when I made my ferris wheel type drying wheel (it's in my gallery photos somewhere) doesn't hesitate. But, when the lures aren't perfectly balance on it, the wheels do move forward as the weights shift, and so the speed is changed briefly. I never had a problem with Etex being unevenly distributed, but I had to be careful not to put on too much, or it would sag to the bottom of the lures.

The motor is 4 rpm, and works fine so far, and it's been 2 years.

I have no experience with microwave motors, so I can't comment.

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I'm pretty sure the "hesitation" your describing is because of the spacing in the gears or a loose fitting connection where your turner attaches to the motor. Spacing in the gears is known as "backlash" and occurs in all gear sets no matter how big or small. To completely eliminate backlash the spacing of the gears would have to so tight that the gears would be constantly wearing on one another and they would eventually create their own amount of spacing. At one time I had problems with Etex settling to one side of the bait and it was because I had applied too much of it at one time. I have only used the microwave motor, but have had no problems with it in the seven months that it's been used and have left my turner running overnight. Can't help but believe the "hesitation" your experiencing is either from a heavy or unbalanced load or slack in the way you have your motor connected to your drying wheel. If you have either slack or an unbalanced load the gears will be meshed tightly while it is pulling the heavy side uphill. Once the heavier side goes past top dead center then gravity takes effect and it tries to fall down on that side until the slack is taken out again from wherever it is coming from. A rotisserie motor might be best for you if you are turning Muskie sized lures whereas a microwave motor can easily turn bass size lures. Hope this helps.

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I think a microwave motor would have to be fairly robust to rotate several pounds for quite a few minutes (prospectively). I use a little 2" dia a/c stepper motor on a 6 lure turner and it has worked for 5 years and counting. But the bottom line is "motors work for as long as they work".

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I dont do alot of baits at any one time, though right now i have several in various stages. Next run for a bait I will center it on the rack to see if it smooths out. Mike King of Talonz uses several motors as he has quite the setup. He always has some play in the ones he has used. Has not found one good one yet. I am sure he has not used a microwave motor. Maybe this weekend I will get that project started.

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