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turtlebait

Cutting Swimbait Segments

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Hey guys,

What is the best way to cut the sides of a swimbait so the cuts meet in the middle and the angles of the cuts are even on both sides? Sorry if this was confusing to read, it was hard to explane. I just want to know how to make even V style segments for my swimbaits. Thanks for reading.

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I don't know how everyone else does it, but here's how I make my joint cuts.

I use a table saw, set to 25 degrees.

I cut out the rectangular blanks, trace the profile of the lure, mark where I want the joints, and then use a sliding mitre guage, with a sacrificial wood extension. I made a test cut, then extended a square line up from the entry point closest to the saw table to the top of the fence.

I make the initial cut by lining up my joint layout on the blank with the pencil line, and then flip over the blank and use the first cut to line up the cut on the other side by lining it up with the same pencil line.

A small variation isn't tragic.

I set the blade height at less than half the thickness of the blank, so that enough material is left after I cut one side and flip it and cut the other to keep the lure blank in one piece, which is easier to shape.

I use PVC decking now, but I used the same system when I used poplar, and it worked fine.

With wood, I finished the joint cuts, after the lure was finish shaped and sanded, by cutting them the rest of the way through with a fine hand saw.

With PVC, I can use a drywall knife to finish the cuts, or just break the by hand and sand the left over plastic off.

I'm sure there are a lot of other methods that work, too.

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Thank you. I never thought of using a table saw. You have saved from alot of fustration.

I cut my segments before I ever shape the bait. mark out the shape and pinpoint where you want the segments ( example on top of a 2x4 block with the body shape on the 4" side) cut either 22.5 degrees to 30 degrees angles with a bandsaw afterwards I reglue the baits with a wax based paste from a woodworking shop ( this is used by woodturners etc. to temporary hold projects together) After cutting out carving and putting my finishing touches on the bait I heat the bait in a toaster oven @170 degrees for a few minutes and the bait seperates. glue can then be completely removed with denatured alcohol or laquer thinner

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there is also a post in the tutorial section they explains how one of the members makes his SB's. very good info and alot of ideas. u should check it out.

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I cut my segments before I ever shape the bait. mark out the shape and pinpoint where you want the segments ( example on top of a 2x4 block with the body shape on the 4" side) cut either 22.5 degrees to 30 degrees angles with a bandsaw afterwards I reglue the baits with a wax based paste from a woodworking shop ( this is used by woodturners etc. to temporary hold projects together) After cutting out carving and putting my finishing touches on the bait I heat the bait in a toaster oven @170 degrees for a few minutes and the bait seperates. glue can then be completely removed with denatured alcohol or laquer thinner

See, there are a lot of different methods. I'd never even heard of that glue system, but it makes perfect sense.

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I think I will use all these ideas. I am going to cut the segments out using a table saw, leaving the blank in one piece. I am also going to make a second cut to cut out a wedge so it has more room to swim.(I feel that works better on large muskie swimbaits). Then I will use that waxed based paste to glue in some wedges that will fit in the gaps. After cutting out the shape of the bait, I can carve it as one piece. I use carving knives so I am hoping this will prevent chipping. I hope it will work as good as I think it will. Thanks again guys.

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My whole family are woodworkers we build custom millwork and cabinets I cant recall the name of the glue but I think it came from turners supply or woodcraft. the wedges idea is a great idea if you want a wide swimmer I have made several like that and I too use carving knives as well as sanders be glad to post if you need any more woodly advise as I may be able to help

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When I work with a wooden bait this is what I use simple and easy. Cut where you want as many times as you want.cutting jig 002.JPGcutting jig 001.JPGcutting jig 003.JPGcutting jig 004.JPG

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Frank,

That's a really clever jig.

If I did lures with a hand saw, I'd copy your idea in a heartbeat!

I do lures in batches of 10 or 12, so I use power tools as much as possible.

Every once in a while, I forget to cut the joints before I cut out the profile on the band saw. When I do that, I crazy glue the cutoffs back onto the lure body, and I can still cut the joints on the table saw.

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You are right if you do alot of the same ones it is easy to do a set up and run a bunch at one time. This was from when I was experimenting with forward cuts or backward cuts. The saw cuts pretty fast and you can watch it from both sides so when it aproches the center just slow down and make a perfect V. And with this saw you dont lose much material. Frank

Frank,

That's a really clever jig.

If I did lures with a hand saw, I'd copy your idea in a heartbeat!

I do lures in batches of 10 or 12, so I use power tools as much as possible.

Every once in a while, I forget to cut the joints before I cut out the profile on the band saw. When I do that, I crazy glue the cutoffs back onto the lure body, and I can still cut the joints on the table saw.

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I've been just using double stick carpet tape. It holds for me while I carve and has to be lightly pried apart after carving. I've used it to join halves and segments at the same time (Some swimbaits I've been doing both so I could put weights in without them showing - carve the weight holes inside the body). Just another option if you're not doing too many baits. I had wondered how others were cutting their joints also - good post.

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