RayburnGuy

Spraying Candies

7 posts in this topic

I'm wanting to try spraying some candy colors and wanted to know if they can be clear coated with DN. After reading a couple articles online about spraying candies it seems a lot depends on the type of clear coat that is used. Any ideas, tips or advice would be greatly appreciated.

thanks,

Rg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dn shouldn't present you any problems if it is compatible with the Candy paint. A object such as a lure doesn't require the care as does a larger object such as an auto. Where you should thin the candie more so than normal paint and apply more coats. This is done to prevent spots that are darker areas because of inconsitent spraying. If you try to apply in a few coats you will find out how well you apply paint lor not. The urethanes are more forgiving than the lacquers and enamels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Candies in the Auto Air paint line are the ones I was looking at trying. Was hoping someone could tell me if they are compatible with DN. I don't want to get into spraying urethane's as I spray inside the house and don't want to go to all the extra trouble of setting up to spray them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I know its not the same, but I've used D2T over candies without a problem. If you have airbrush clear, you could spray that over the color to protect it before applying DN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I know its not the same, but I've used D2T over candies without a problem. If you have airbrush clear, you could spray that over the color to protect it before applying DN.

I've got D2T as well as E-tex, but I really prefer the finish that DN gives. Was pretty sure the epoxies would not have any adverse reaction. I finally found info on Auto Air's web page that claimed their candies were compatible with "all" urethane's so I guess we'll just have to see. Thanks for the help guys.

Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty new here so I don't know anything about building lures, but I know automotive paint. Auto Air Colors will work with all urethane clears. Water based candies are 100 times more forgiving then solvent based candies (House of Kolors). The problems that arise with solvent based candies are becuase these colors are essentially overly reduced to give the transparent affect. The more reducer makes makes the the paint more sensitive to film thickness, flash times between coats, temp and humdity. Reducers act as thinners and release from the paint while its flashing. This means to heavy a coat, to short of a flash time or the wrong reducer for the tempature will affect how the reducers release or become trapped and cannot release. These candies also being so thin are why you see alot striping or blotching on larger areas - as said before. Alot of this sensitivity is lessend in the water based candies because of non chemical reducers, but the same still apllies. What you are essentially doing is is putting a chemically drying D2T over a physically drying Auto Air Color. I am going to assume the D2T will bite much more agressively into into your basecoats than urethane clears. When it is cures will odviously create a vapor barrier. To make this work you need be sure the physically drying basecoat has completly evaporated its reducers before topcoating. If i remember correct Auto Air colors doesn't have a topcoat window so make sure your bases are beyond flashed before applying the D2T, maybe paint them in the evening and topcoat in the morning. I bet it will work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty new here so I don't know anything about building lures, but I know automotive paint. Auto Air Colors will work with all urethane clears. Water based candies are 100 times more forgiving then solvent based candies (House of Kolors). The problems that arise with solvent based candies are becuase these colors are essentially overly reduced to give the transparent affect. The more reducer makes makes the the paint more sensitive to film thickness, flash times between coats, temp and humdity. Reducers act as thinners and release from the paint while its flashing. This means to heavy a coat, to short of a flash time or the wrong reducer for the tempature will affect how the reducers release or become trapped and cannot release. These candies also being so thin are why you see alot striping or blotching on larger areas - as said before. Alot of this sensitivity is lessend in the water based candies because of non chemical reducers, but the same still apllies. What you are essentially doing is is putting a chemically drying D2T over a physically drying Auto Air Color. I am going to assume the D2T will bite much more agressively into into your basecoats than urethane clears. When it is cures will odviously create a vapor barrier. To make this work you need be sure the physically drying basecoat has completly evaporated its reducers before topcoating. If i remember correct Auto Air colors doesn't have a topcoat window so make sure your bases are beyond flashed before applying the D2T, maybe paint them in the evening and topcoat in the morning. I bet it will work.

Thanks Break. Very informative.

RG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now