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thujalures

Anti-freeze/cure Wood

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Years ago, it was suggested by a fellow lure maker to soak my newly cut wood in antifreeze to prevent any cracking while the wood is drying. I have lost a good amount of prime wood to cracking. I am using all white cedar for my lures. I have tried this technique and it really helps. Has anyone practiced this ? My only question is how long should I soak my pieces in antifreeze. Your thoughts on this idea would be appreciated. Just cut and debarked 30 pieces and I want to soak and dry them out (above the furnace) . Or if anyone else has a better way to dry out wood, I would appreciate it. Thanks!

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I wouldn't put them above the furnace, that justs accelerates the problem. The drying process must be done slowly.

You could go to a wood working shop and get some sealer that is wax based to seal the end grain. Wood turners will rough turn green wood and then seal it in a variety of concoctions to slowly dry the turning to prevent cracking and minimize warping before doing the final turning.

If you have smaller blocks you could try placing the blocks in a brown paper bag filled with wood shavings or saw dust to slow the drying process.

Do a search for drying green wood, you'll find plenty of discussions in wood working forums.

Bottom line, air drying should be done slowly (not close to the furnace) and sealing the end grain minimizes the cracking.

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Years ago, it was suggested by a fellow lure maker to soak my newly cut wood in antifreeze to prevent any cracking while the wood is drying. I have lost a good amount of prime wood to cracking. I am using all white cedar for my lures. I have tried this technique and it really helps. Has anyone practiced this ? My only question is how long should I soak my pieces in antifreeze. Your thoughts on this idea would be appreciated. Just cut and debarked 30 pieces and I want to soak and dry them out (above the furnace) . Or if anyone else has a better way to dry out wood, I would appreciate it. Thanks!

Doesn't a lot of antifreeze have silicone in it? If so I wouldn't want it anywhere near items I had to paint. :nono:

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To prevent cracking you should use polypropalene glycol. this is a waxy plastic that is disolved and soaks into the wood preventing shrinkage and thus cracking. Anti-freeze is ethylene glycol and will do little to nothing to aid in stabilizing you wood.

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