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Metal Head

How Do You Make Your Swimbait Joints?

6 posts in this topic

Hey guys,

I was just wondering what everybody uses for making their swimbait joints? I have been using a simple coping saw for the last year and now that I have my carving technique down, I want to start perfecting my joints. Don't get me wrong, a coping saw is great, but its time consuming and with such a thin diameter blade it is very flexible and if I'm not paying attention for a sec, I start getting a slanted cut in my joint and ruin baits.

Any tips guys? I'm mostly looking towards a hand tool because they tend to be cheaper and more easy to store (I'm in college and stuck in a small apartment). What would you recommend?

Thanks

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I use barrel swivels pined in with stainless steel wire. Drill a couple holes in the end of your joints that the swivel will fit tightly in and then drill a smaller hole in the sides or top of your bait to catch the eye of the swivel. Epoxy the pins in and you got a joint. Barrel swivels are used for fishing anyway, and even for bigger fish, are they not used on the end of a steel leader? This works for me, others use a through wire method that would need some more power equipment. Using the barrel swivels really would only need a drill and side cuts to cut the wire. Again, just how I do it.

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I use barrel swivels pined in with stainless steel wire. Drill a couple holes in the end of your joints that the swivel will fit tightly in and then drill a smaller hole in the sides or top of your bait to catch the eye of the swivel. Epoxy the pins in and you got a joint. Barrel swivels are used for fishing anyway, and even for bigger fish, are they not used on the end of a steel leader? This works for me, others use a through wire method that would need some more power equipment. Using the barrel swivels really would only need a drill and side cuts to cut the wire. Again, just how I do it.

Good idea Joe.

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I use a small tenon saw (some call it a back saw) that I bought at a model shop. The deep saw blade plus the reinforced spine, prevents the saw from flexing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backsaw In the link, the middle saw in the picture.

I cut part way through, before shaping. This operation is much more difficult once the lure body is shaped. By cutting only part way through, the body is still in one piece and easy to carve. When ready to cut the sections, you have a guide slot, making the job much easier and less chance of ruining the work that you have already done.

Dave

Edited by Vodkaman

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I use a small tenon saw (some call it a back saw) that I bought at a model shop. The deep saw blade plus the reinforced spine, prevents the saw from flexing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backsaw In the link, the middle saw in the picture.

I cut part way through, before shaping. This operation is much more difficult once the lure body is shaped. By cutting only part way through, the body is still in one piece and easy to carve. When ready to cut the sections, you have a guide slot, making the job much easier and less chance of ruining the work that you have already done.

Dave

Thanks for the tip Dave. I should have thought of using that kind of saw! Great tip on partially sawing before the bait is finished. I always have a problem getting the saw teeth to grip where I need to cut after the bait has been sanded as smooth as glass!

Hey Joe, thanks for the idea, but I have been adding swivels for hook holders for a while too. Saw it on Triple Trouts and figured I'd give it a whirl! I'm more interested in the tools and techniques to make the joints, not the hardware used to connect the joints.

Any more tips?

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Thanks for the tip Dave. I should have thought of using that kind of saw! Great tip on partially sawing before the bait is finished. I always have a problem getting the saw teeth to grip where I need to cut after the bait has been sanded as smooth as glass!

Hey Joe, thanks for the idea, but I have been adding swivels for hook holders for a while too. Saw it on Triple Trouts and figured I'd give it a whirl! I'm more interested in the tools and techniques to make the joints, not the hardware used to connect the joints.

Any more tips?

Instead using swivels for connecting the segments I have used these connectors http://www.barlowstackle.com/acb/showdetl.cfm?&DID=6&User_ID=6432204&st=4250&st2=61991804&st3=66375273&Product_ID=2800&CATID=114 they are alot cheaper than swivels.

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