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spidergrub6

Spooling Out The Twist And Shout

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It seems like every time I try to spool new line on my spinning rod the line always seems to get twisted up and wraps around my rodtip and guides. This results in what I call the twist and shout when your trying to cast light finesse baits and your line does everything but what you want. I'm just wondering if there is a certain line spooling technique to combat this. I've tried holding the filler spool in all different positions (spool vertical, spool horizontal, winding in same direction, in opposite direction). It seems like if I'm winding it on with the filler spool positioned one way it will work for a while and then after 20 or 30 yards start twisting again. So then I flip the spool over and that helps for a while but it messes up again. Any tips for a frustrated angler? It certainly doesn't seem like it should be this complicated.

Thanks is advance.

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@ spidergrub6

Must not neccessarely be your mistake , sometimes it happens !

In Europe we've most likely been using spinning reels exclusively , casting gear came to fashion just recently , so I had that this happen to me a few times before as well .

It depends on how the bulk spool was filled or it can just be a matter of the line quality , ..........many years ago I've read on one spool pack not to wind from a turning filler spool , but just put it flat on the floor and wind down over it's rim without having it spin too much , .......that's what I am still doing today with monofilament .

But you have to find out on the first few yards , which side of the filler spool should be pointing upward .

It might be the line you use having too much memory , a too stiffish quality , ........maybe try using softer stuff for once .

Could also be the reels fault , ..........do your issues happen instantly after filling the spool of your spinning reel and first fishing or after a certain time of use during a few sessions ?

In the first case the mistake would be in the monofilament or the way of winding it on ,....... in the second case it could be the reel's fault putting twist into your line or not corresponding well with that particular kind of mono .

Or do you frequently fish inline spinners or devons without anti-twist vanes ? This might lead to the same results !

good luck , diemai :yay:

Edited by diemai

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Actually you have the right technique. With the filler spool vertical, retrieve the line until it starts to twist then flip it over, retrieve more line until it starts to twist, flip the spool again. Continue until your reel is full.

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I can jump on the band wagon and say that line twist on a spinning reel will drive a man nuts!! The best way that I have found to spool my spinning reels are to put the line through the last line guide (closest to reel) only, then have someone hold the spool, if you don't have a line station, very close to the line guide. I will make sure the line is coming off the filler spool the same direction that it is going onto my reel. The main key is to make sure you have line tension on the new line going on. If it has slack, it will cause excessive twist. This has worked for me.

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Thanks guys, I really appreciate the replies.

I've spooled up a couple of different reels since I posted this and experimented a bit with the technique. To clarify, diemai, the twist problem was happening while I was reeling the new line on the spool. The line would get really twisted and wrap around the tip of my rod several times while trying to fill up the spool. Diemai, I like you idea about not spinning the filler spool and just winding it off the top but some of the spools I use have a little notch cut into them that catches on the line while it's coming off. When I wound some on last night I had line coming off in the same direction that it was going on the reel. The line went through all the rod guides and it worked just fine. But then again, I have tried this before and had bad results so I think it might have something to do with how the manufacturer winds the line.

I also like the idea of just passing the line through the bottom guide, I'll have to try that.

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@ spidergrub6

If these notches in the filler spool are disturbing too much , you might try and cover them real snug with some thin tape , probably the line would just jump over without catching anything anymore ?

The way you're describing it , to me it seems to be a line quality problem ,...... or , as you've stated , a question on how the line was put onto the filler !

good luck , diemai :yay:

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There's a right way to do it and a wrong way. Just put the line spool on the floor and run the line through the first guide and attach to the reel spool. Hold the rod with your non-reeling hand under the guide and keep some tension on the line with your fingers as you reel it on. (the tension is very important) You either want the line coming off the spool in the same direction as the bail turns or the opposite - to tell you the truth, I can never remember which is correct, but I always manage to figure it out once I get started, as the line will twist almost immediately if it's the wrong way. If all else fails, go down to the nearest river, (preferably on a bridge) remove any terminal tackle and let all of your line drift downstream with the current. After it's hung there for a while, reel it in slowly and the twist will be gone. Not a bad idea to do that once in a while anyway. Pre-loaded spools shouldn't have any twist at all when they come from the factory or tackle shop. The equipment they use to load the spools is designed to prevent twist.

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Here is another trick that works with monofilament line, two steps.

First, feed the line onto the reel through a guide or two. Have the line feed off the spool by unwinding it off the spool. Those line caddies work well but you can put the line on the ground or floor with a plastic bucket or box over it to hold it down and let the spool unwind when you load. It must roll off the spool.

That is part one.

Part two.

Well, first I am off on a little back ground information tangent. Monofilament is an old product dating back to the 1930s, its base chemical make up is NYLON. Even the copolymers work this way.

That is a plastic chemical, the molecule is long and large, it is so large that water molecules can enter the molecular matrix of the material. That is why there is a difference in wet and dry break strengths and why mono stretches. The water will help lubricate the plastic on a molecular level and allow the line to stretch out and relax.

To facilitate getting the monofilament to relax and reshape itself to the new spool prepare a cup of boiling water, micro wave a coffee cup of water to boiling.

Once it is boiling take it out of the 'wave and drop the spool into it and let it cool. The heat will expand the molecular matrix and allow the molecules to move over themselves and relieve the stretch and also the hot water will then enter the material and facilitate the process. Once it cools you are as ready as that patricular line is ever going to be.

When your line dries out between trips it can stiffen somewhat. Soaking it a few hours, (you don't need to heat it again but that can help relieve twist that developed from use) will prepare the mono again. Just fishing with it will loosen it up off course as it gets wet but this will get the process going quicker.

A related method that uses the same principle but no heat is to load the reel any way you like and then drag the line without any terminal tackle behind the boat a while. This will stretch the line and the physical stretching will allow it to untwist and also introduce water into the material which keeps it supple and facilitate its ability to stretch and absorb shock without breaking.

Edited by Piscivorous Pike

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Accidentally came across this one just now :

!

More vid's on the subject to be found on YouTube , .....just type in term "how to spool on line" into the search bar on top of page !

Maybe , this helps a bit , ...........greetz , diemai :yay:

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A related method that uses the same principle but no heat is to load the reel any way you like and then drag the line without any terminal tackle behind the boat a while. This will stretch the line and the physical stretching will allow it to untwist and also introduce water into the material which keeps it supple and facilitate its ability to stretch and absorb shock without breaking.

If you've never done this you won't believe how much friction is placed on the monofilament by dragging it behind the boat. It will put a pretty good bend in your rod. I have to do this every so often even with my baitcasters when fishing jigging spoons if I tie directly to the spoon. They're notorious for putting twist in your line.

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