rotorhead

Clear Coating

26 posts in this topic

Several weeks ago someone posted a new clear coating called Deft Clear Coat so I decided to check it out and here are my findings. The coating cost about ten dollars a quart and can be purchased at Lowes or Home depot. I made some crank baits and used it as a sealer (I used cedar wood) by dipping three times and letting it dry for two hour before redipping. Just a light sanding between dips. The finish looked great and the water based paint adhered well with no problems. I dipped four times after the paint was dry and let the baits dry two hours between dips. The finish looked great and I did not put them on a turning wheel as I would have with E-tex or 2-ton. I also dipped a one inch dowel four times sanding between dips. I let the dowel dry overnight and then submirged the dowel under water for 24 hours. The coating stayed clear and did not soften, the wood stayed dry. I don't know about hook rash as of yet but will test for that this weekend. Anyway this might be a great coating for both sealing and the finish coat. If anyone else has anything information please let me know thanks

Rotorhead

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how hard is the finished clear coat? i was disappointed with the softness of SC9000

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I read that thread also and ran out to get some. It worked decently to seal the blanks I had. however, i am not to fond of how bad the stuff is for you apparently. I experimented(again) with prop on a painted test sample and it worked out nice. I think some other people use that deft stuff, but from a thread i had on here, watch the fumes!

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Well I used the dreft and worked great then started havin trouble so I started using a polycrilic water based. So I dip twice in the poly and last coat in laquer and it turns out great!

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how hard is the finished clear coat? i was disappointed with the softness of SC9000

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Deft may react differently on plastic cranks vs. wood. But, on the plastic cranks, when I dipped several times (letting each coat cure overnight), the Deft never did seem to fully cure. I tried it several times, same results. You can dig your fingernail into the coating and leave an impression.

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I'll still use it for my white bass cranks, as I sometimes get 3-4 destroyed in a night; but cranks I want around a longtime, or I put a lot of time into; I'm using Devcon. (currently experimenting with DN)

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To add to my post above, I'm now a fan of Dick Nite Topcoat. After several trials with different cranks of design/styles; it's GREAT for dipping! MUCH easier to work with than Devcon. Just dip it, hang it up, and in a few days; ROCK SOLID!!!

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As for storage; someone on a different message board recommended spraying propane on top of the DN in the can before capping it off (vs. Bloxygen). Since I have a few cans of propane in the garage for the 'blue wrench' and most dipable top coats are already flammable; this was an easy solution. I sprayed the propane in the main can, then I put the DN can in a larger can and sprayed propane in that too; for insurance. ;) Weeks later, opening the can, the topcoat looked brand new. Ready for action! :)

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I am also wanting to try the dn I read on here that you can turn tohe can on its side put a screw in it and it stores good so i think I am going to try this. The dreft is still workin for me but like they said it is a little soft now when it gets hot.

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I am also wanting to try the dn I read on here that you can turn tohe can on its side put a screw in it and it stores good so i think I am going to try this. The dreft is still workin for me but like they said it is a little soft now when it gets hot.

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Bassin, refresh my memory, what's the process with the screw in the can again? (I recalled reading something about it a while back, but don't recall the details):huh:

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I thought about trying a screw-in tap for the DN but haven't heard any long term results from guys who have tried it. My concern is that SOMETHING has to fill that void in the top of the can as the level drops, and that SOMETHING is air containing moisture. In my experience, if there's air contacting DN in the can, it's gonna start to cure within 4-6 months.

If butane works, that's a great! Nice to run down to the drug store and buy a can of cheap butane versus shelling out for Bloxygen (nitrogen/argon gas mix) plus shipping.

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I thought about trying a screw-in tap for the DN but haven't heard any long term results from guys who have tried it. My concern is that SOMETHING has to fill that void in the top of the can as the level drops, and that SOMETHING is air containing moisture. In my experience, if there's air contacting DN in the can, it's gonna start to cure within 4-6 months.

If butane works, that's a great! Nice to run down to the drug store and buy a can of cheap butane versus shelling out for Bloxygen (nitrogen/argon gas mix) plus shipping.

I've been using the same quart can for over two years using the screw-in tap. It hasn't cured yet. I have probably an eight of a can left (maybe more).

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Bassin, refresh my memory, what's the process with the screw in the can again? (I recalled reading something about it a while back, but don't recall the details):huh:

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Anyone?.........................."Bueller, Bueller?" :D

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I tried searching, but had no luck.:huh:

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Anyone?.........................."Bueller, Bueller?" :D

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I tried searching, but had no luck.:huh:

Don't open the top of the can; use a self tapping sheet metal screw through the side of the can near the bottom to make a hole to decant the DN into a smaller container to dip lures in. Use same screw to plug the hole.

Edited by SmokeyJ

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Don't open the top of the can; use a self tapping sheet metal screw through the side of the can near the bottom to make a hole to decant the DN into a smaller container to dip lures in. Use same screw to plug the hole.

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Very nice, That's kinda what I was thinking. It seems like the little bit of air going back in the can to displace the topcoat, would still cause it to skin over? :huh: Apparently not.

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Very nice, That's kinda what I was thinking. It seems like the little bit of air going back in the can to displace the topcoat, would still cause it to skin over? :huh: Apparently not.

Wouldn't know, I have never used DN. I've just been around long enough to know the method. Jcheetam said he's been using the same can for 2 years using that method, though, and hasn't had the issue. I imagine there is a thin layer of cured DN at the top of the can that protects the rest of the finish in the can.

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Yep, "tapping the keg" works very well. I have been using the same can for over two years, and still have a little left. Also have a new can ready to "tap". After a few uses there will be a build up of material on outside of can at screw site. This is good. It helps seal can when screw is in place. Got the idea from rodbuilding friends several years ago. We use a product to apply finish to rod blanks that is very similar to DN. The "tap a keg" process REALLY saves money here. This stuff cures 5 times faster than DN and without this process I have had to throw away several 4 oz. bottles that were more than half full. No more!

David

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captsully18 recommended the "tap the keg" method to me many months ago when I got my first can of DN. I have had no problems with the DN starting to skin over. When I need to use it I remove the screw and the DN begins to pours out ... then I just put the screw back in.

Like captsully18 said there will be some build up of DN where the screw enters the can. Don't know if this helps ... but is doesn't hurt.

I have wondered if I could replace the screw with a small cork. This would allow me to pour enough out to dip lure into it and then the left over pour back into the hole and re-cork it. That way I won't waste any.

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I have wondered if I could replace the screw with a small cork. This would allow me to pour enough out to dip lure into it and then the left over pour back into the hole and re-cork it. That way I won't waste any.

If you do this you would be taking a chance on contaminating, or starting the curing process, on all of it. Especially if you live in an area of the country that has high humidity like we have here in East Texas. I haven't been using DN as long as a lot of folks here at TU, but from what I've read the curing process can be started just by contact with moisture laden air when pouring it from one container to another. And once the curing process is started I haven't heard of any way to stop it.

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Just a thought (rare, I know :lol: ). Would a pump dispensor, like for the two part epoxy systems, work for DN? Or could you use a tapered syringe, like the Flexcoat syringes, to pull out only what you want from the bottom of the container?

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Chris, if you replace the screw with a cork I think you will find that it won't seal as well as the screw. As for pouring left over DN back into can you will contaminate what is in can. Since what you had out has begun to set while exposed to air that reaction will continue in the can and you will probably loose entire contents.

Mark, the syringe idea sounds good. I would be leary of it though. I don't think the syringe will seal as well as the screw, and you would have to turn can on it's side while dispensing from the syringe. As the hole for tip or syringe will be larger than for the screw a lot of air can enter while you dispense. The syringes for Flexcoat work very well since no chemical action occurs until both parts are put together so it makes no difference if air gets into the bottles.

Just my two cents.

David

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Mark,

I definitely think that trying the syringes is a good idea. You could use just a small amount to test it out. If it doesn't work, no big loss. If it does work then you have a great idea!

jeremy

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Tap a keg, pump, or other, the important thing is to manage the headspace in your container of leftovers. The gas that fills that void should be dry, oxygen free, and heavy. I (and others in the woodworking community) do NOT recommend using propane, butane or any other chemically reactive gases in your finish. We use only ultra pure Argon for our product. Argon is a small percentage of the air we breathe, but it is also an inert, noble gas that's heavy and totally dry. It has no reactions with any chemicals or elements.

Bloxygen is only about 12 cents per use, it's simple and it works well.

Just trying to help.

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I use both DN and D2T. Both have thair place depending on what you are doing.

I had never been so frustrated in my life with a problem like the storage of DN.

I tried everything possible for years including Bloxygen and wasted I don't know how much money on DN.

The method described by La Pama on using a self tapping screw and keeping the can on it's side is the only thing you should ever fool areounfd with It works and it works to kleep any moisture cured coating for as long as you want to keep it.

Thanks for the tip and dont waste your time or money with any other method.

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I have used syringes and they do work. The only problem I ran into was that the rubber seal over time in the syringe begins to get damaged.

What kind of screw are you using for the "self tapping" tap the keg method?

thx.

Jed

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