cardawg

Compresseor Question

6 posts in this topic

Hey Everybody,another newbie,long time lurker,first time poster,looking to advance from rattle can to airbrush,already have bought the airbrush,now looking to buy the compressor,question is what is needed to run 1 airbrush for painting lures, not afraid to spend the money to get the right one, just dont want to waste money on buying more than I need.Thanks in advance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Everybody,another newbie,long time lurker,first time poster,looking to advance from rattle can to airbrush,already have bought the airbrush,now looking to buy the compressor,question is what is needed to run 1 airbrush for painting lures, not afraid to spend the money to get the right one, just dont want to waste money on buying more than I need.Thanks in advance

You need a constant flow of clean, dry air at 40lb+- to be sure your brush works right. You may not run it at that pressure, but there are some paints, the thicker ones, that require more pressure to avoid problems.

Look for a compressor that has a tank, and that can put out enough pressure to keep a constant airflow at 40psi. I use a construction compressor that has a 5 gallon tank, and can put out well over 100psi, but you don't need that much storage capacity. A two gallon tank will be plenty.

Home Depot, Lowe's, and Harbor Freight offer small construction compressors at reasonable prices.

Unless you need to worry about noise levels, these type tank compressors will work fine.

And too big is better than too small. Too small a compressor or tank will constantly cycle, trying to keep up with your airbrush, and will wear out sooner.

The next thing you need is a good combination pressure regulator and water separater. They're not expensive, but being able to control the air pressure, and remove any water in the air, is critical to painting success.

And remember, just because a paint is water borne, it can still damage you lungs and sinuses, so use at least a dust mask when you spray them.

I am no artist, just a carpenter, so I try to remove as many of the variables as I can from my painting setup that might cause problems. That way, when I screw up, I know it's just me being me. :lol:

Edited by mark poulson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I'd add to what Mark says is the need for a filter that will remove oil mist from your compressed air. Once you move up to a larger compressor most of them will be an oiled type. That means they have a set of rings on the compressor piston and are lubricated much like an automobile engine. There is no way to ensure a 100% seal with a set of compression rings and some oil, even though a minute amount, will get past these rings. And it doesn't take much oil to ruin a paint job. I picked up my filters at Harbor Freight for less than $10 apiece. They're called an inline dessicant dryer/filter. Here's the link.

http://www.harborfreight.com/inline-desiccant-dryer-filter-94733.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I'd add to what Mark says is the need for a filter that will remove oil mist from your compressed air. Once you move up to a larger compressor most of them will be an oiled type. That means they have a set of rings on the compressor piston and are lubricated much like an automobile engine. There is no way to ensure a 100% seal with a set of compression rings and some oil, even though a minute amount, will get past these rings. And it doesn't take much oil to ruin a paint job. I picked up my filters at Harbor Freight for less than $10 apiece. They're called an inline dessicant dryer/filter. Here's the link.

http://www.harborfre...lter-94733.html

Thanks for the input guys,1 more question,Home Depot sells a compressor with a 2 gallon tank and a air regulator for about 60.00,would this be big enough to run the air brush

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A 2 or 3 gallon tank should be fine. My local Sears has a 3 gallon model on sale this weekend for $59. If it is an "oil-less" model, you shouldn't need an oil filter - all you need is a moisture trap and a pressure regulator (if the model you buy doesn't already have one). The moisture trap should be attached at the compressor's outlet, in front of the air supply hose.

Edited by BobP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run a Harbor Freight airbrush compressor, 0-40 working pressure, 56 psi maximum. Oiless, tankless, automatic shutoff, Central Pneumatic model # 93657. It comes with a moisture trap, and a nice, easy to adjust regulator with a knob on top. I paint in a spare bedroom, and it is very quiet, can't hear it in the next room. I think I paid $75, and it shows every sign of running forever. Everyone I know who uses one of these loves it. Simple to move, and takes up hardly any space. If you want a shop type compressor, will use it for tire inflation, air tools, or nail guns, and space and noise are not a concern then get a larger compressor. But if I had to replace mine tomorrow, I'd go buy the same unit again, as it is perfect for my usage, and a bargain, as far as airbrush compressors go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now