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cmoe

Turning Wood Plugs

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Just got my lathe. I was wondering if anybody had some suggestions for the types off wood that work best for making lures that also turn well on a lathe? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks all.

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Just got my lathe. I was wondering if anybody had some suggestions for the types off wood that work best for making lures that also turn well on a lathe? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks all.

I suggest red and white cedar as well as bass and poplar. Pine will work for development or set-up purposes.What kind of lathe did you get?

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I suggest red and white cedar as well as bass and poplar. Pine will work for development or set-up purposes.What kind of lathe did you get?

I got a craftsman. I believe it is a 42 inch lathe. I got it for free from a guy I work with. Machine runs great. Haven't done ant wood turning in a long time, but it is comming back pretty quick. hope to be making some lures by the end of summer.

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I got a craftsman. I believe it is a 42 inch lathe. I got it for free from a guy I work with. Machine runs great. Haven't done ant wood turning in a long time, but it is comming back pretty quick. hope to be making some lures by the end of summer.

That sounds nice! The shop where I work has a copy lathe and a back knife lathe I have been nagging at my boss to make some lure bodies. I think it would happen faster if iIbuy my own machine. I have this idea that might work for your lathe being 42" , you can get 40" blanks and make a jig that would make a 3" plug every 3.5" . You will end up with lots of plugs really quick with half the effort. Good luck.:D

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I suggest red and white cedar as well as bass and poplar. Pine will work for development or set-up purposes.What kind of lathe did you get?

cedars are great for turning. remember to have a system to pull away the dust when sanding. and dont scrimp on cutters.

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That sounds nice! The shop where I work has a copy lathe and a back knife lathe I have been nagging at my boss to make some lure bodies. I think it would happen faster if iIbuy my own machine. I have this idea that might work for your lathe being 42" , you can get 40" blanks and make a jig that would make a 3" plug every 3.5" . You will end up with lots of plugs really quick with half the effort. Good luck.:D

I'd make sure I had some kind of a center rest/support if I were turning multiple lures on a 40" blank.

And always make sure your tools are sharp. That's the easiest thing you can do to improve your turning.

Don't be afraid to use a wood rasp or file for shaping, too, and sand paper to finish your lures while they're still on the lathe. Saves a lot of hand work.

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As I make muskie jerk or slash baits, I like woods with higher densities. Hence, maple and birch are my two classical species. I have recently tried basswood and was impressed with how even grained and easy to turn it was, but is was so light that I added some weight to the lures. Basswood would be good for a topwater lure for sure.

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As I make muskie jerk or slash baits, I like woods with higher densities. Hence, maple and birch are my two classical species. I have recently tried basswood and was impressed with how even grained and easy to turn it was, but is was so light that I added some weight to the lures. Basswood would be good for a topwater lure for sure.

What do you use to seal your lures to make them more waterproof?

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Hi Mark,

Last year`s batch of 50 was sealed with Nu-Lustre 55 prior to priming and painting, and then the paint job was sealed again with the same product. By the way, I like the added weight and durability of epoxy as I use my plugs for pike and muskie. Though the lures were unbelievably successful, we have not had a single one crack or have any problems.

This year, I was looking for a faster way to seal them (a dipping approach VS a darn mixing of two products). I have given the Minwax Wood Hardener a try, and after the priming and painting, we will seal one last time with Nu-Lustre. I know the Minwax stuff is a health hazard, but it always makes me smile when I think of it as I often melt lead into my lures anyway. I have come to accept that making lures has its risks, just like walking down the street (mind you, I always use toxic products outside on a windy day). I am anxious to see the results of the Minwax product, and especially to know if there are compatibility issues between the paint, sealer, primer and final epoxy coat.

Pat

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Thanks Pat.

It will be interesting to hear how the Minwax Hardener performs, expecially with the harder woods you use.

Please let us know.

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