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Manny

Devcon Final Coat

12 posts in this topic

Manny    0

New to the Devcon final coat thing and had a newbie question.

I have been using West Marine two part Marine epoxy for final coat.( Left over from a boat building project)

But it wil yellow somewhat the white colors.

I picked up some Devcon clear epoxy but all I found was 5 min. ( Home Depot ) Is this the right stuff.

Also when brushing it on do I use DA to thin it in order to make it brushable ?

Thanks

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surfk9    36

I would suggest that you use the 30 minute...gives more working time. I doubt that you could do anything with 5 minute,except set line ties, hook eyes, etc. As for the DA i feel it's a personal thing that you will discover for yourself.i've done it both ways,with/without...using DA allows for a somewhat easier "flow" but again it comes down to personal choice depending on lure size ambient room temp etc. good luck!

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Husky    13

Here's a way to apply it without thinning it. You can use this method with most other TC's. I Don't know about DN.

You can get D2T in 9 oz bottles on line.

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BobP    832

NO, THE FIVE MINUTE DEVCON IS NOT THE RIGHT STUFF! It cures too quickly, does not level out like the Two Ton "30 minute" variety, and turns yellow/brown very quickly. You can use denatured alcohol to thin D2T but the best practice in warm climes is to apply it unthinned. I mix a FEW drops of DA into my D2T when cold ambient temps make it too thick to brush easily, or when I'm coating a bunch of baits and want to increase its "pot life" by a couple of minutes. But thinning does mean that the coating will be thinner and offer less protection.

Edited by BobP

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Husky    13

NO, THE FIVE MINUTE DEVCON IS NOT THE RIGHT STUFF! It cures too quickly, does not level out like the Two Ton "30 minute" variety, and turns yellow/brown very quickly. You can use denatured alcohol to thin D2T but the best practice in warm climes is to apply it unthinned. I mix a FEW drops of DA into my D2T when cold ambient temps make it too thick to brush easily, or when I'm coating a bunch of baits and want to increase its "pot life" by a couple of minutes. But thinning does mean that the coating will be thinner and offer less protection.

By using the "Finger Painting method" I described, there is no need to thin, as you will increase your speed by a lot!

Edited by Husky

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Husky    13

The 5 minute is not waterproof, only water resistant.

Happy 4 th Bunky!

Isn't it a bit early for you, couldn't sleep? :rolleyes:

BTW, the "Finger Painting Method" works well with SC 9000

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mark poulson    1,700

Happy Fourth right back at you!

I get up early to talk to you. ;)

I tried you finger method.

I'm still trying to get my finger out of my nose! :lol::lol::lol:

On a serious note, I did try adding water to Dap clear 100% silicone, and it set in two minutes!

I was using a tube to attach some aluminum grating to a sst framework, and mixed up some of it in a solo cup.

Amazing!

Then I sprinkled some water on the beads of silicone I'd put on the metal, and it set up more quickly, too.

Talk about a revelation.

I've been using silicone caulking ever since it first came on the market, in the '60s, and never dreamed of using water as a curing agent.

Once again, the genius of Husky shines!!!!!!

Edited by mark poulson

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Manny    0

Happy Fourth right back at you!

I get up early to talk to you. ;)

I tried you finger method.

I'm still trying to get my finger out of my nose! :lol::lol::lol:

On a serious note, I did try adding water to Dap clear 100% silicone, and it set in two minutes!

I was using a tube to attach some aluminum grating to a sst framework, and mixed up some of it in a solo cup.

Amazing!

Then I sprinkled some water on the beads of silicone I'd put on the metal, and it set up more quickly, too.

Talk about a revelation.

I've been using silicone caulking ever since it first came on the market, in the '60s, and never dreamed of using water as a curing agent.

Once again, the genius of Husky shines!!!!!!

I use a pea size amount of Acrylic paint to the silicone to cure it in minutes..... You can use any color and you can see how good its mixed.

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mark poulson    1,700

I use a pea size amount of Acrylic paint to the silicone to cure it in minutes..... You can use any color and you can see how good its mixed.

Man, I am slow on the uptake. I've been using silicone for over forty years, and I never dreamed it could be modified.

Doh!!!!! :lol::lol::lol:

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rofish    2

I mix a FEW drops of DA into my D2T when cold ambient temps make it too thick to brush easily,

I have found a method not to be at the mercy of ambient temperatures. After mixing the epoxy, which I always thin, I use hot air over the mixture to make it more fluid. You can see the air bubbles changing their mood, being more willing to find their way out of the epoxy. Also, I use hot air over the freshly epoxied crankbait, to be sure that any air bubble, even very small ones, will leave the epoxy.

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BobP    832

Rofish, I tried heating Devcon Two Ton to make it more brushable in cool temps but for me, it just didn't work. I think how much heat to apply is a guessing game I often lose. Too little, there's minimal effect. Too much and you're screwed with fast hardening epoxy. So instead I mix in a few drops of denatured alcohol to get the epoxy to the consistency I like to brush. You can use various solvents to thin epoxy but denatured alcohol works best for me. It does not evaporate so quickly (like acetone) that the epoxy re-thickens during the brush period. It lengthens the brush period by a couple of minutes (a good thing) but does not appreciably lengthen the total cure time (which lacquer thinner can do).

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