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Why Salt ?


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#1 Bob La Londe

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 02:07 AM

What is the purpose of adding salt to baits? I always thought it was a taste attractant to the bass. I remember when I first started fishing Zoom salt worms it amazed me how long the fish would hold the bait.

Since then I have read all kinds of things about salt, from the weight of the bait to the texture and hardness of the plastic.

So far I have not put salt in ANY of the baits I have poured, and I have caught fish on every one of them, but then I am a fan of Megastrike.

Edited by Bob La Londe, 09 July 2010 - 02:08 AM.


#2 CaptRodney

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 03:49 AM

What is the purpose of adding salt to baits? I always thought it was a taste attractant to the bass. I remember when I first started fishing Zoom salt worms it amazed me how long the fish would hold the bait.

Since then I have read all kinds of things about salt, from the weight of the bait to the texture and hardness of the plastic.

So far I have not put salt in ANY of the baits I have poured, and I have caught fish on every one of them, but then I am a fan of Megastrike.



Bob it can do a few thing you mentioned including helping your bait sink faster or slower depending on amount used

#3 Bass-Boys

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 06:20 AM

the Capt. is rite on...
sink rate is the main reason.. a lot of guys do not want to use any weight ( lead sinkers )mostly on stick worms..and still get the bait to sink..salt is good for some stuff and no salt is also good for some stuff..

#4 jesse1378

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 10:19 AM

weight is the main reason. i like to throw my 4" slim stick with just a hook. but you have to keep an eye on the amount you use because too much salt will cause the color to become milky. and just like with glitter it will degrade the integrity of the bait. for my sticks i use 1 cup plastic, a capful of softner (i use soft plastic), and the about 2 tablespoons of salt. give the bait a slow than normal fall but still a good wiggle, and a good weight to cast far with my 6 ft med action rod with 8lb test mono.

#5 Senkosam

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 10:49 AM

"the weight of the bait, texture and hardness of the plastic"

Taste not an issue.
Not used for frogs or near-surface jerkworms or bug baits.
Not used for craws and stand-up style baits or anything else you want
to stand off bottom.

Too much kills softness.
Uniformity tough from bait to bait if using regular grain salt.
Fine grain salt sold in supermarkets works well.

#6 mark poulson

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 09:58 AM

Isn't it ironic that my Dr. says stay away from salt, but the fish seem to love it! :lol:
Seriously, I'm convinced the heavy salt in both the Ika and the Senko is the reason fish eat those baits regularly.
I don't mean just hit, I mean eat, as in swallow.
I add 1oz of salt for 4oz of plastic, mostly to get the casting weight I want, but also to get the fish to hold the lure longer. That amount of fine Del's salt doesn't make the baits too opaque.
I have fish eat my Zoom lizards, too, and Robo worms, but not nearly as often. Fish will hold an Ika or Senko so long that I have been able to gently lead them out of cover before I set the hook. They don' want to let go!
I pinch down the barb on the 4/0 hooks I use for them, because they get swallowed so quickly sometimes that gut hooking is a problem, and pinching down the barb makes turning and removing the hook a breeze. I seldom lose a fish with that big hook, even when they jump, as long as I keep good rod tension on them.
I use salt in my Ika knockoffs, and use softener to keep the plastic soft. With a thick piece of plastic, like an Ika body, softness helps with good hooksets.

#7 daveh

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 07:04 AM

use salt mainly on my trick worms i fish wacky style weightless. no salt takes to long to sink.

#8 earthworm77

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 05:47 PM

I think it may aid in bait retention. I use it for making baits sink faster then non salted baits