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Z? Zuanon

How This Stuff Works?

11 posts in this topic

The machine in the top video was a custom built duplicator used by a commercial crankbait builder in Kernersville, NC. I suspect someone with local furniture industry experience built it, or adapted it. It was advertised for sale awhile back and the price was in the $25000 range, if memory serves.

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That is a very nice machine, with some interesting solutions to the problems of duplicating machines.

I have not seen this cutter before. Could not see if it was an abrasive or toothed. A broad cutter like this, cuts down on the cycle time compared with my choice of a circular saw. The saw produces ridges, which I reduce by slowing the feed screw, which doubles the cycle time. The 'donut' shaped cutter does not create ridges.

With a broad cutter, the first cut is a problem, compared with the saw. The saws first cut is like butter, but the 'donut' cutter has to be fed slowly into the stock. The designer of this machine solves this problem by building a 'lead in' shape on his master.

'parting off' when the master is mounted on a spindle is not possible. The designer solves this problem by making the master over size and scales down the size through the transfer levers.

Clever use of hydraulics in the feed mechanism. A complex design, one of the best I have seen. You have your work cut-out (excuse the pun) if you intend building this design.

Dave

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I believe it is a regular 6" diameter saw cutter. BUT, be careful, these cutters have a maximum speed of 8000 or 9000rpm. If you plan on using an angle grinder, these run at 12,000 rpm. You will have to slow the grinder down some to maintain the safety limits of the machine.

Also, if you examine the cutter blade closely, the cutters should 'step out' from the disk, alternately left and right. This is essential for the duplicator machine to work. Not all blades have this step.

My machine uses a 4" diameter blade, designed for the angle grinder. But the maximum depth of cut that I can achieve is 22.5mm. This limits the size of lure body that I can cut to that from a 40mm x 25mm stock.

The circular saw also leaves 'ridges' on the final body. Some extra time is required on a flap wheel in a drill press, to clean up the body ready for accepting a seal coat. But I am still able to cut 100 bodies in a day. I did thirty yesterday afternoon and plan to do 60 more today.

Dave

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What speed do the lures turn at while cutting and what kind of motor turns them? What moves the angle grinder from left to right? I assume its similiar to a feed like on a mill or lathe or maybe done manually??

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Their are no motors on my dup machine (yet), it is all driven by hand (crank wheel). The maximum speed that you can turn the stock, without the cutter jumping is approximately 120rpm (two cycles per sec). But this number slows down, the deeper the cut, as the cutter is trying to climb while cutting more wood. So at the start and end of the run, I go a little slower.

I use a standard 1/2" threaded bar, to drive the saw cutter across the stock. This is about 15 tpi (memory). I gear down the stock and master 2:1, so this gives me 30 cuts per inch.

Here is a link to my machine with pics. The machine photographed uses a router. I was not happy with this and later modified to take the grinder. Post No23 shows the grinder results, with the cutter marks. Far from perfect solution: http://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/17541-vman-rocking-beam-duplicator/page__p__132910__hl__duplicator__fromsearch__1#entry132910

Search through homebrew tools forum. Quite a few machines that others have been working on.

Dave

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