Richard Prager

Other Than Using An Airbrush,

18 posts in this topic

paintbrush or rattle cans are there any other ways to apply paint to hard baits. Maybe a sponge? I'm thinking about dabbling with the hard baits and I'm looking for possible ways to do this indoors. Thanks

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I don't think anything's even close to an airbrush. If you're concerned about noise, you ran run one off of a compressed air or CO2 tank. I assume you aren't concerned about vapors if you're considering using an aerosol can.

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Thanks for the replies so far. I am concerned about vapors. I had to stop pouring plastic because of them. I'm looking for something a bit out of the ordinary and something I can do at or around my desk.

Beautiful work, John!

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I spray water based Createx and Auto Air inside the house with no ill effects. My work bench is closed in on 3 sides and I've not noticed any over spray with the pressures I use to run my brush. (10psi to 30psi)

Edited by RayburnGuy

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I spray water based Createx and Auto Air inside the house with no ill effects. My work bench is closed in on 3 sides and I've not noticed any over spray with the pressures I use to run my brush. (10psi to 30psi)

Thank you. It looks like you just gave me the go ahead with phase 3 of my tacklemaking obsession! Since I've stopped pouring I've been buying unpainted heads and learned to make jigs with the quidance of the guys in the Wire Baits section (thanks Ted!). Since this has gone from a business to a hobby, I have really been enjoying myself and would like to possibly expand on it. Tacklemaking has become fun again. Thanks for your replies, Looks like a have another section of TU to read through!

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When you shoot water based acrylics with an airbrush, some of the paint particles partially dry as they hit the air, clump together, and fall out of the spray pattern or bounce off the side of the lure in the form of dust. More is created when you are test firing the brush to check the spray pattern. That's the downside of shooting inside a simple box because you need to clean the dust out regularly or it will get blown onto lures you are painting. Alternatively, you need a spray booth with positive ventilation and a filter to collect it as you produce it. I get around this by painting in the garage but I confess that isn't much fun on days like today when temp/humidity is 100+, or in February when highs are in the 30's.

Most of us sort of ease in to bait building over time but there's something to be said for getting the right equipment and work environment together early in a hobby or business. That way, good technique and build routine become second nature instead of 'adventures in bait building' when you introduce them later. I'm hesitant to make some changes in the way I make baits because I don't want to have to take a step back down the quality ladder to learn and integrate them into my build routine. Not an optimum attitude, but fortunately I only build baits as a hobby and have only myself and a few friends to make happy.

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When you shoot water based acrylics with an airbrush, some of the paint particles partially dry as they hit the air, clump together, and fall out of the spray pattern or bounce off the side of the lure in the form of dust. More is created when you are test firing the brush to check the spray pattern. That's the downside of shooting inside a simple box because you need to clean the dust out regularly or it will get blown onto lures you are painting. Alternatively, you need a spray booth with positive ventilation and a filter to collect it as you produce it. I get around this by painting in the garage but I confess that isn't much fun on days like today when temp/humidity is 100+, or in February when highs are in the 30's.

Most of us sort of ease in to bait building over time but there's something to be said for getting the right equipment and work environment together early in a hobby or business. That way, good technique and build routine become second nature instead of 'adventures in bait building' when you introduce them later. I'm hesitant to make some changes in the way I make baits because I don't want to have to take a step back down the quality ladder to learn and integrate them into my build routine. Not an optimum attitude, but fortunately I only build baits as a hobby and have only myself and a few friends to make happy.

Thanks for all the info and will take everything into consideration. I do have a big air conditioned garage. The problem is, it's too big (6 cars but empty) and ridiculous to run the air all day in the summer. I am finding it more relaxing to work at my computer/TV desk. This is where I've been making my jigs, except for the powder painting and do find it more relaxing than the garage. The wife thinks I'm more available to the kids as well since I haven't been disappearing in the garage for hours upon hours. I'll figure out something that works for me. We do have a guest room but never any guests........hmmmmmmm!

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Thanks for all the info and will take everything into consideration. I do have a big air conditioned garage. The problem is, it's too big (6 cars but empty) and ridiculous to run the air all day in the summer. I am finding it more relaxing to work at my computer/TV desk. This is where I've been making my jigs, except for the powder painting and do find it more relaxing than the garage. The wife thinks I'm more available to the kids as well since I haven't been disappearing in the garage for hours upon hours. I'll figure out something that works for me. We do have a guest room but never any guests........hmmmmmmm!

I used to hand paint a lot of mine. There are stencil brushes and sponges that you can use. You have to keep em pretty dry to get the effect you want. They are called "stencil brushes". Worth a shot if ya want to try, they are inexpensive. If you do decide to use it, keep a piece of paper handy to work some of the paint off the brush before you go to the lure. You can even use the netting with some brushes, just have to make sure it is secure and wont move. i would recommend a clear coat before starting definitely. I washed off a few before I got some desired effects.

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I used to hand paint a lot of mine. There are stencil brushes and sponges that you can use. You have to keep em pretty dry to get the effect you want. They are called "stencil brushes". Worth a shot if ya want to try, they are inexpensive. If you do decide to use it, keep a piece of paper handy to work some of the paint off the brush before you go to the lure. You can even use the netting with some brushes, just have to make sure it is secure and wont move. i would recommend a clear coat before starting definitely. I washed off a few before I got some desired effects.

Now, that does sound interesting to me! Thanks for posting that, atrophius! I think I will give this method a go first. I use a brush to "tap" on my powder paint, so I'm comfortable with brushes. It is something out of the norm, which appeals to me and also is something I can do right at my "desk shop" My wife will love the idea of me not using up any more real estate for my hobbies! Is there a specific type of paint that works best with this method? You also mention a clear coat prior to painting. What do you recommend for this as well? Thanks to all for your input!

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paintbrush or rattle cans are there any other ways to apply paint to hard baits. Maybe a sponge? I'm thinking about dabbling with the hard baits and I'm looking for possible ways to do this indoors. Thanks

I use camel hair paint brushes for base coats and then follow up with a sponge brush. Just be sure you have some sort of pallet to dab your sponge on first before applying to your lure; not quite as perfect results as when using a spray brush but a lot easier and cheaper. Check out the river runt I have in the gallery, I sponge painted it. Permanent markers can also be handy sometimes, I used them on the "sail shark" in the gallery also. I am going to get a spray brush one of these days I promise but till then I think the fish care more about how the lure acts in the water than how it looks.

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I use camel hair paint brushes for base coats and then follow up with a sponge brush. Just be sure you have some sort of pallet to dab your sponge on first before applying to your lure; not quite as perfect results as when using a spray brush but a lot easier and cheaper. Check out the river runt I have in the gallery, I sponge painted it. Permanent markers can also be handy sometimes, I used them on the "sail shark" in the gallery also. I am going to get a spray brush one of these days I promise but till then I think the fish care more about how the lure acts in the water than how it looks.

Thanks, Lance. I like that river Runt. I wonder if my 3 year old will let me use her sponge brushes? I better get some lure bodies for her as well.

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Thanks, Lance. I like that river Runt. I wonder if my 3 year old will let me use her sponge brushes? I better get some lure bodies for her as well.

If you already have problems because of pouring plastics, be smart and invest in a really good paint booth, with outside ventilation, and a charcoal filter respirator. I have my own set of problems from working in construction for over forty years, so I can relate.

There is no free lunch. Every type of painting and finishing has it's hazards, and even water based paints will coat your lungs if you're not careful.

Instead of trying to find a risk-free paint or finish, which is non-existant, I'd encourage you to put your time and energy into finding a spray booth and filter system that will truly protect you health, and make your wife really happy.

The ultimate payback:

"Live long enough to be a burden on your children". ;)

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You could always get a mouth full of w/b acrylic and do something like this laugh.gif. Pete

stock-photo-ancient-aboriginal-art-hand-prints-animal-herds-spiral-16792507.jpg

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You could always get a mouth full of w/b acrylic and do something like this laugh.gif. Pete

stock-photo-ancient-aboriginal-art-hand-prints-animal-herds-spiral-16792507.jpg

Just don't inhale! :lol:

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Just don't inhale! :lol:

I have found the small sponge brushes used by women to apply eye makeup to work as a dry brush method for lures.Use very little paint on the sponge then wipe almost dry on a paper towel and dry brush the color onto the lure.You can get some nice paint jobs this way.Airbrush is the best,but some times you can get by with this method,and save a ton of money.You can get the small sponges at the eye makup counter,and they are low cost,and can be cleaned.

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I have found the small sponge brushes used by women to apply eye makeup to work as a dry brush method for lures.Use very little paint on the sponge then wipe almost dry on a paper towel and dry brush the color onto the lure.You can get some nice paint jobs this way.Airbrush is the best,but some times you can get by with this method,and save a ton of money.You can get the small sponges at the eye makup counter,and they are low cost,and can be cleaned.

I would imagine with a little practice, I would be able to get some decent blends or fades (not sure of the term) using that "dry brush" method. I'm going to place a small order for some bodies and see how i like it. Between the stencil brush and bojon's method, the wheels are starting to turn. Gadawgs mentioned a straw and that got me thinking about how we used to do the backgrounds for science fair display boards. We got some interesting results spreading the paint by blowing through straws. The input I'm getting here really is invaluable and is much appreciated. Thanks to all!

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