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MuskyGary

How Many Colors?

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For those of you who pour for yourself and friends; how many colors of a mold lure do you carry when fishing? I find myself carrying ten to twelve colors of the same worm or swimbait! And I'm always looking for other colors to make. Just wondering what you limit yourself to when fishing. :lol::lol:

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For those of you who pour for yourself and friends; how many colors of a mold lure do you carry when fishing? I find myself carrying ten to twelve colors of the same worm or swimbait! And I'm always looking for other colors to make. Just wondering what you limit yourself to when fishing. :lol::lol:

I used to carry probably 4 times that for quite a while until I realized all I ever throw are variations of black w/flake, watermelons and green pumpkins.

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For those of you who pour for yourself and friends; how many colors of a mold lure do you carry when fishing? I find myself carrying ten to twelve colors of the same worm or swimbait! And I'm always looking for other colors to make. Just wondering what you limit yourself to when fishing. :lol::lol:

I have convinced myself color makes very little difference; might be wrong but you can't convince me a fish turns down a chance to eat based on color. That being said I do tend to use lighter more translucent natural looking colors in clearer water and darker solid colors in more dingy water. I think the best color is confidence. Odd I should say that considering I can have long conversations with my fishing buddy over what color to make my next lure; fishermen have strange ways :)

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Black neon, pearl white, GREEN PUMPKIN!!!, and chartruese on occasions.

In the icecream world, there was a time when colors were flavors. Pick the flavor you like and fish the hell out of it.

I guess I like green pumpkin flavor, but gimme somma that black... and don't be skimpy.

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I eliminated the extra a long time ago, I carry green pumpkin, watermelon, roadkill, black, junebug,...and variations of them. If I need bubblegum or white......it is a specific time of the year and then it comes out of my bag afterwards.

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I have convinced myself color makes very little difference; might be wrong but you can't convince me a fish turns down a chance to eat based on color. That being said I do tend to use lighter more translucent natural looking colors in clearer water and darker solid colors in more dingy water. I think the best color is confidence. Odd I should say that considering I can have long conversations with my fishing buddy over what color to make my next lure; fishermen have strange ways :)

There actually is a chance that a fish (especially bass & trout) will turn down an offering based on color. If what they're used to feeding on is bluegills and crawfish and you throw a neon red worm in front of their face, they may not hit it, but do the same with a pumpkin green and there's a better chance they'll devour it. "Match the hatch" as the fly-fishing saying goes, actually applies to a lot more than flicking little feathery hooks at trout.

That being said, the colors I carry greatly depend on the lake I'm fishing because the types of forage can vary between bodies of water. I'm a bass angler so this mostly applies to LM and SM bass but for the most part, if fish are feeding heavily on threadfin shad and you throw an all black hollow belly swimbait, you'll catch fish, but throw a threadfin or sexy shad colored hollow belly and you'll catch more and bigger fish.

The colors I carry depend more on what region of the US I'm fishing rather than just the color of the water. Northern lake: Yellow Perch color, Green Pumpkin, Watermelon, Green Pumpkin/Chartreuse tip, and dark blue will cover most lakes. IF there's a known herring population I may make some smoke/blue baits. Southern lakes: Green Pumpkin (red or blue flake), Junebug, Black (blue, red, or no flake), Scuppernong, and smoke/silver colors.

Of course other colors will catch fish but so far these have been what I carry at all times. Only time I use anything neon/bright is for a worm tip or straight bright colors on floating worms in the Spring. I'm mainly a finesse angler so getting the most natural presentation possible is what I try to do. I've found that color CAN and DOES make a difference at times when bass fishing.

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There actually is a chance that a fish (especially bass & trout) will turn down an offering based on color. If what they're used to feeding on is bluegills and crawfish and you throw a neon red worm in front of their face, they may not hit it, but do the same with a pumpkin green and there's a better chance they'll devour it. "Match the hatch" as the fly-fishing saying goes, actually applies to a lot more than flicking little feathery hooks at trout.

That being said, the colors I carry greatly depend on the lake I'm fishing because the types of forage can vary between bodies of water. I'm a bass angler so this mostly applies to LM and SM bass but for the most part, if fish are feeding heavily on threadfin shad and you throw an all black hollow belly swimbait, you'll catch fish, but throw a threadfin or sexy shad colored hollow belly and you'll catch more and bigger fish.

The colors I carry depend more on what region of the US I'm fishing rather than just the color of the water. Northern lake: Yellow Perch color, Green Pumpkin, Watermelon, Green Pumpkin/Chartreuse tip, and dark blue will cover most lakes. IF there's a known herring population I may make some smoke/blue baits. Southern lakes: Green Pumpkin (red or blue flake), Junebug, Black (blue, red, or no flake), Scuppernong, and smoke/silver colors.

Of course other colors will catch fish but so far these have been what I carry at all times. Only time I use anything neon/bright is for a worm tip or straight bright colors on floating worms in the Spring. I'm mainly a finesse angler so getting the most natural presentation possible is what I try to do. I've found that color CAN and DOES make a difference at times when bass fishing.

As Al Pacino once said to Keanu Reeves in the movie The Devils Advocate;"I stand corrected" :)

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