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RiverMan

Weighting BIG BAITS

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I want to weight a really big cedar bait...about 9 inches long. I am guessing the bait will take about 3 ounces of lead to properly weight. Do you just drill the holes like always and then melt in the lead? Seems like I will be drilling an awful lot of holes.

Thx.

Jed

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That's what I do. I use a large dia. forstner drill bit. 3/8" or 1/2". I have also used the Dremel tool to cut out holes etc. and then fill with molten lead. Jim

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Thanks Jim,

Guess I will have to continue experimenting and buy a couple of the forstner bits you have mentioned. The bits I generally use have a tendency to rip the wood some which I can correct with the wood putty but I would rather not have to do this. I just hate putting all those holes into such a beautiful blank, hurts, lol. Thanks again.

jed

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I just drill a series of holes along the belly and than using a chisel, create one long continuous hole. It seems to work pretty well. I fill in the entire cavity with molten lead.

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Riverman,

I have had good success using the following and I know how you feel when drilling into one of your own hand made creations, I will never get used to it.

If I want the bait to suspend for example, I add egg sinkers or just lead in general to the hooks to space out the weight. Put the lure into a pail of water and experiment until I get the sink/float rate I want.

I then take 2 pieces of scrap wood, clamp together and drill the size of hole I think will work (3/8, 1/4 etc)right in the middle of the seam.

Melt the proper amount of lead(from test) and pour apprpriate amount into each hole. Let cool and take scrap apart and you have proper sized plugs to fit into the holes you will grudgingly drill into your lure.

I usually add a little bit extra and have it protude, so I can file it off for minor adjustments. Can also drill out to adjust.

I have used the above to modify many larger lures such as Rapala Super Shad Raps to make them suspend. Rapala has yet to make such a bait, but I am sure they will sooner or later. Muskies can't stand to have them sitting still in front of them.

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Fish'n,

Very ingenious method you have come up with for figuring out each sized lead. Why not just drip the lead directly into the hold in the bait tho?

jed

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Riverman,

I HAVE tried that method. It was the first method I used, but after several spills on my nicely sealed/sanded baits(almost got my hand), I decided to try the casting method mentioned previously. Also if the hole is drilled too deep, you are left with a gap that needs to be filled. I just tap the plug in until it is flush and sand smooth. After painting, you won't see it unless you know where to look. Another benefit is, if you are doing many lures, you can pour all the weights at the same time. At times, I have poured extra plugs of lead, drilled a hole in the end and placed on the hooks to find the correct weight distribution. I find that saves a fair bit of time.

I can't remember who/where but I read on this forum where they screw the hook hanger into the lead weight. Anybody have any positive/negative thoughts on this?

This is why I LOVE this forum, so many fantastic ideas. All I need is the time to try them ALL.

Fish'n Technish'n

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Fish'n,

I can see how a person could get in trouble if the holes were drilled too deep. I didn't have any problem getting the melted lead in the holes tho, just held onto the lead with some needlenose, fired up the propane, and melted right into the holes, very easy. I do like how neat and tidy lead plugs go in tho as you are suggesting which is what I usually use, pencil lead, but in the case of these big baits the pencil lead is too small. Thanks for the ideas.

jed

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Question! If you want to add weight to sink this lure then why not use a heavy wood for starters? Red Oak or Oak will be heavy from the start and the need for weight lessen. What action will this lure be used in > like deep trolling? or cranking?. If your trolling then I would use a 3 way keel or walker weight or down rigger insted of a perminate weight in the lure,and if your casting I would go with a heavy wood to start and depending on the action desired I would add weight and a possible a tail diving lip. I'm just puzzled of all this weight you want to add to a lure.

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You bring up a very good point Boatnik and one that I had not thought of. I am using cedar and the board I am working with now seems to be exceptionally pourous and light. I am also building big baits 8-10 inches long and 3/4 inches thick and plan on casting them for bass. If, however, I planned on trolling them I would still need to get the weight such that the lure sits correctly in the water. The one I am currently working on took probably 3 ozs of lead to get it to sit right in the water, any less and it would just lay on its side. This was a major hassle as I had to drill 5 holes 3/8 inches wide and probably a half-inch deep for all the lead. I'm a bit gun-shy about going deeper with the lead holes as I have had baits get the center of gravity thrown off by going too deep. Anyway, all the holes left little room to put the two hooks in, wish there were a better way but I have yet to find one.

I bought a new drill bit today that is making the process much, much, easier. I believe the bit is called a brad-point or something like that, about 6 dollars for the 3/8 inch size and it cuts like a dream. I wanted the forstner but they were 16 bucks!

Jed

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