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troutgnat

Painting Scales

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Gentlemen,

This is getting to be fun but I have so much to learn. Fun, yes, but easily frustrating....LOL. I have found plenty of material to use for scale patterning and have the technique down for putting it in place. My question is: What is the proper painting technique? Do you put the darker color on first with no material and then put your material in place and then shoot the lighter color.

I'm basically starting with a white pearl side and trying to fade darker up into the back but I just can't seem to get the scale patterning to look right. Would anyone like to enlighten me on the proper technique please. Thanks in advance!...........D

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I find that using a darker base coat, and lighter scaling colors, gives the most contrast. It's what I use for my black crappie and bluegill patterns.

For trout, I typically use a pearl white belly and lower sides, pearl silver upper sides and back, and then scale with my green sides and shoulders, and my pink side strip, if I use one. Trout have such fine scales that it is really subtle, so that's why I don't try for as much contrast.

I'd suggest you play around on a test sheet, and see which method and color combination works for your tastes.

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Gentlemen,

This is getting to be fun but I have so much to learn. Fun, yes, but easily frustrating....LOL. I have found plenty of material to use for scale patterning and have the technique down for putting it in place. My question is: What is the proper painting technique? Do you put the darker color on first with no material and then put your material in place and then shoot the lighter color.

I'm basically starting with a white pearl side and trying to fade darker up into the back but I just can't seem to get the scale patterning to look right. Would anyone like to enlighten me on the proper technique please. Thanks in advance!...........D

The short answer to your question is yes. "fades" are usually a combination of two or more colors although it may look much simpler to the naked eye. Prime your bait all white then hit the belly & sides with the white pearl. Now take black and paint down the side of the bait about half as far as you want the fade to start. Paint it fairly dark. The overspray will naturally fade down the side of the bait. You can paint the back too if you wish. Put the scale material down and dust the sides with plain white to your taste. Then dust again with white pearl to your liking. Take your time you don't want to spray the white/pearl on to fast/thick. The coverage of the white over black will naturally fade getting darker towards the top on the bait. You should get defined scales with a natural fade.

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