troutgnat

Proper Airbrushing Techniques

13 posts in this topic

Gentlemen,

I'm shooting a Iwata Eclipse top feed .35 brush. I'm trying to practice my in-close detail work. Shad dots, gills, crawfish squiggles, etc. Anyway I've tried to turn my psi down but it seems I keep getting the "web" affect. I'm not sure what you call it but it's when your circle splinters outward.

Could anyone enlighten me on maybe speed and other factors to consider for "soft" work.? Also, one thing I have not figured out yet is movement of the brushes' needle. I know it's adjustable, but what's the advantages/disadvantages of moving it all the way in or backing it out?

Thanks.........D

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I use the same airbrush. The adjustable trigger (back and forth) will allow more (all the way back) or less (partially way back) paint to come out of the nozzle. The same trigger down will control the amount of air through the nozzle all the way down is full pressure half way down is half pressure ect.. By manipulating the regulator at the compessor that is of course controlling the amount of air available to your brush. Now by manipulating the amount of paint (pulling the trigger back) along with the amount of air (pushing the trigger down) will give you the effects you are desiring (after you master it) It takes time. Grap a cardboard box and paint nothing but dots big and small.

Then connect the dots with thin lines and fat lines and "play" with the trigger while doing this you will eventually get to where you have control of your brush. Thats what I did hope it helps.

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the viscosity of the paint is another variable over which you can exercise control.

Try the same things you've been trying but with thinner paint.

You'll be pleased once you get the hang of it.

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It's a balance between air pressure, paint viscosity, and how close you hold the airbrush to the surface. Many guys take the end off the airbrush so they can get the needle/nozzle closer. Personally, I just use painting templates made from frisket material. With a template, you can get both sides of the bait the same, there's no drama, and you can save the template for use on many baits.

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Another thing you'll need to do to get in close is to lower your air pressure. How much depends on the viscosity of your paint. The thinner it is the lower the air pressure needed to shoot it. I'm shooting Auto Air and Createx paints and thin them with Auto Air 4011 reducer. By thinning them I can lower my air pressure to just a few psi if needed. The best advice I can offer is to just keep trying different things until you find something that works for you.

good luck,

Rg

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I am not a good painter, so, to add fine details, I use solvent based Sharpies. Then I shoot a coat of Createx clear over that, and heat set it, and dip in my final clear coat.

I've tried stencils, but I've found the Sharpies are easier for me to control.

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Very interesting replies here gentlemen. Thank you!

check out the work of these responders, and decide if you prefer one method or the other since there are so many ways to do this. Overall, just practice.

Buy a 2gang solid white electrical switch cover plate from Lowes/HomeDepot/ACE.... Then you can practice all you want, wipe it off, try other techniques... The white plate will let you see the effects of having the basecoat down for various colors. Buy a black one as well if you like a lot of dark baits.

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Gentlemen,

I found one cause of my "webbing" was clearly to high of a psi for me anyway, I followed that up with a little more thinning down of my paint and it is helping. This in addition to practice, practice and more practice and I am getting better. Thanks to all. Good luck getting me away from the bench!

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The one word you said Practice, practice, practice is the main key to becoming proficient with the airbrush. I ran into the same problems several years ago that you are experiencing now and with the help of the great members here and a little work, my painting got better each time. I think one of the main things you can do is practice a little everyday, not just one time a week and don't spend hours trying to paint, just do a little a lot and you see great changes, just don't give up.

Rotorhead

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A HAPPY GUN IS A CLEAN ONE!

make sure your tips are clean...left over paint tends to stick to the needle and sometimes that screws up your dots.. I take off my end protector to get close to the bait then slowly move it out while making quick light taps and slowly pulling back with my finger at 40 to 45 psi with transparent paint thickness. BUT THE FIRE WORKS THING HAPPENS TO US ALL!!! do what I do.... if you get the fire works splatter.. just make your DOTs BIGGGER and fix it!!!It's your world as my main man BOBBY ROSS SAYS!!! IF YOU really screw it up.. MAKE A TON OF DOTS ON THE BAIT and call it a TROUT!

Remember the 4 P's OF KILLER AIRBRUSH PAINTING.. PATIENCE, PRACTICE, PRESSURE and think hard MARY JANE and you will figure out number 4! B)

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I would say ditto to the practice, practice.....I have no art skill whatsoever and about 3 years later with the airbrush

I am able to make nice small dots. Practice a lot with paint viscosity and pressure. For me anyway, I can now "feel" what will be good as far as air flow and paint viscosity goes. I just finished up a polka dot spook lure and got a couple firework dots. I thought to myself, It would be cool if I could get all of the dots to do that!

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Remember the 4 P's OF KILLER AIRBRUSH PAINTING.. PATIENCE, PRACTICE, PRESSURE and think hard MARY JANE and you will figure out number 4! B)

There's no P in beer, at least not until you've drunk it. ;) Then you'll go to pot. :lol:

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