Fishwhittler

Moisture Trap For Master G22 Airbrush

10 posts in this topic

Lately I've been having problems with my airbrush "spitting" water while I'm painting. I've been able to temporarily fix that by removing the nozzle cover and spraying the water out, but that only works for a little while before it starts spitting water again. I'm looking to get a moisture trap (I've got one that's mounted on the compressor, but apparently it's not doing it's job very well), and I was wondering if any of these three moisture traps will fit my brush. I'm using a Master G22 airbrush with an Airbrush Depot TC-20 compressor.

Paasche In-Line Drainable Moisture Trap

Badger Transparent In-Line Drainable Moisture Trap

Iwata Pistol-Grip Filter

I think both of the two in-line filters would probably work. The Iwata Filter might be a higher-quality filter, but it may not fit my brush so I think I'm probably better off going with either the Badger or Paasche filter. Does anyone have any suggestions or preferences?

Thanks in advance.

Ben

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I had the same problem with my Iwata when I first got it. I was in Harbor Freight one day and they had a moisture trap that connects on the compressor. Got it and it has worked great ever since. My AB hasn't spit any water in the least since.

Best part was it only cost around $6.

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I take it your pressure regulator does not have a moisture trap built into it. My pressure regulator has the moisture trap built into it and I have it mounted on my workbench as close as possible to where I'm airbrushing without being in the way. The reason for mounting the moisture trap close to the airbrush is this. When the moisture filter is connected to the compressor it's still possible for condensate to form in the air hose between the compressor and the airbrush. Especially when using a long length of hose and when the surrounding temperature is much lower than the temperature of the air coming out of the compressor. The temp of the air coming out of the compressor will be much warmer due to friction and pressure. When warm air and cooler temps meet moisture forms. Think about the moisture that forms on the inside of your windows when you have the heater on and you have cold temps outside. I would suggest buying an inline moisture trap and placing it as close as possible to where you connect your airbrush hose. If your using the regulator that is built into most compressors you might want to buy a pressure regulator that has a moisture trap built into it and attach it to your workbench and just use a quick connect to attach the air supply coming from your compressor. It's also much easier to adjust the air pressure to your airbrush when it's mounted close by. And like Kris, says you can no doubt pick up a moisture trap at Harbor Freight, or any of the building supply stores, much cheaper than what you can buy one online for.

Ben

Edited by RayburnGuy

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Lately I've been having problems with my airbrush "spitting" water while I'm painting.

Does anyone have any suggestions or preferences?

When was the last time you drained your pressure tank? I will let you guess how I thought of this one, lol. It actually fits, that you hinted that the problem had only just started occurring.

Tip - don't open it onto your workshop floor thinking it will be a few drops of clear water, I emptied about 2 pints of brown sludge onto my nice tiled floor.

Dave

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I wasn't very clear in my first post; my question was if any of the filters I mentioned would work with my airbrush.

RayburnGuy, I was aware that the air hose getting condensation was causing the problem. I do have a filter/condenser on my pressure regulator (which is mounted next to the compressor), but the condensation in the hose is causing problems. I figured putting a second filter in the hose close to the airbrush would fix it.

Vodkaman, I drain my moisture trap after every painting session. It still has moisture on the walls of the tank, but I don't think that's what the problem is. I've also taken my moisture trap off and dried it out several times. Like RayburnGuy said, my problem is condensation in the air hose. I think that the colder weather is causing the condensation, because I didn't have any issues earlier this year.

For the Badger and Paasche filters, how do they install in the hose? It looks like you just cut the hose in half and stick the ends on the filter.

Any help is appreciated. cool.gif

Ben

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I wasn't very clear in my first post; my question was if any of the filters I mentioned would work with my airbrush.

RayburnGuy, I was aware that the air hose getting condensation was causing the problem. I do have a filter/condenser on my pressure regulator (which is mounted next to the compressor), but the condensation in the hose is causing problems. I figured putting a second filter in the hose close to the airbrush would fix it.

Vodkaman, I drain my moisture trap after every painting session. It still has moisture on the walls of the tank, but I don't think that's what the problem is. I've also taken my moisture trap off and dried it out several times. Like RayburnGuy said, my problem is condensation in the air hose. I think that the colder weather is causing the condensation, because I didn't have any issues earlier this year.

For the Badger and Paasche filters, how do they install in the hose? It looks like you just cut the hose in half and stick the ends on the filter.

Any help is appreciated. cool.gif

Ben

I was having the exact same problem. The filter on the compressor shows moisture in it although no moisture comes out when I press on the valve or open it up. I bought an Iwata pistol grip filter and that solved the problem (which you guys told me to get one in the first place!). Whether or not the trap on the compressor is working I was still getting moisture in the hose. It is a 1/8" fitting and connects to the bottom of the airbrush. It is small and does not get in the way. I bought from this guy for 9.99 on e-bay.

http://shop.ebay.com/sugartaji/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_from=&_ipg=25

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I did understand the question, but sometimes their is an underlying problem. Plus, this was on my mind after emptying about 2 to 3 pints of sludge all over my floor. If you haven't actually drained your tank for a long time, it is worth looking into. I live in a very humid climate and so I will be emptying mine with a bit more regularity from now on.

Dave

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I did understand the question, but sometimes their is an underlying problem. Plus, this was on my mind after emptying about 2 to 3 pints of sludge all over my floor. If you haven't actually drained your tank for a long time, it is worth looking into. I live in a very humid climate and so I will be emptying mine with a bit more regularity from now on.

Dave

I misunderstood your first post; I don't have an air tank for my compressor. I was referring to the polycarbonate jar on the condenser. I drain that frequently, but I don't have an air tank so I don't need to worry about water in it.

I'm going to try to get a filter from NAPA auto parts that Whittler recommended to me on another site. They come in a two-pack and each one is supposed to last about a year, which is plenty long for me.

Thanks everyone for your help. cool.gif

Ben

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I misunderstood your first post; I don't have an air tank for my compressor. I was referring to the polycarbonate jar on the condenser. I drain that frequently, but I don't have an air tank so I don't need to worry about water in it.

The information you gave in your first post was comprehensive. I should have followed the links, my bad.

Dave

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A while back I bought a mini-blaster, or as some call it an etching tool. It had an inline filter similar to the Paasche filter in the link you provided. The hose ends were attached to it with hose crimps. Small zip ties would probably work just as well if you had to cut your hose to install it. Sorry for all the confusion.

Ben

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