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Lipless Sinking I Just Need A Few Tips

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Good evening everybody:

I've been trying to build lipless sinking crankbaits (with rattlers inside) but I havent' been

able to get them to have a good wobble.

I don't know whether the problem lies on the shape, wrong weight, or anything.

Has anyone been involved in makin this kind of lures? I havent't found much information

about these lures in the forum.

Can anyone help me a bit.

Thanks in advance.

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Good evening everybody:

I've been trying to build lipless sinking crankbaits (with rattlers inside) but I havent' been

able to get them to have a good wobble.

I don't know whether the problem lies on the shape, wrong weight, or anything.

Has anyone been involved in makin this kind of lures? I havent't found much information

about these lures in the forum.

Can anyone help me a bit.

Thanks in advance.

Can you tell us a little more about what materials you are using and how you are trying to go about it?

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One tip I can give you is to make a hollow channel, like a cupped groove, from the nose of the bait to the line tie. If you check the Yozuri 3D vibe lures, they have that groove. I think it acts like a cupped bill, and really helps the bait wobble. I use that with my smaller swimbaits, and they swim with a wide wobbling action. I made the groove with a rat tailed file, and sand paper on a dowel.

Edited by mark poulson

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I've made both floating and sinking lipless baits but never tried to get a wide wobble. I'm always looking for a very tight action on this style of bait. I've just followed the pattern of an old rattle trap. The key is line tie placement for me. I will have to try Mark's trick of the cupped lip now.

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Can you tell us a little more about what materials you are using and how you are trying to go about it?

Thanks for your reply, I am rather a novice at making lures and I've started with wood. I use recycled materials as

pine wood. Then I paint with spray can and coat them with 2 component epoxy.

I attached a picture of one of my lures so that you can see what I'm talking about.

Tanks!!

post-15017-034490600 1288079875_thumb.jpg

post-15017-034490600 1288079875_thumb.jpg

post-15017-034490600 1288079875_thumb.jpg

post-15017-034490600 1288079875_thumb.jpg

post-15017-034490600 1288079875_thumb.jpg

post-15017-034490600 1288079875_thumb.jpg

post-15017-034490600 1288079875_thumb.jpg

post-15017-034490600 1288079875_thumb.jpg

post-15017-034490600 1288079875_thumb.jpg

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Thanks for your reply, I am rather a novice at making lures and I've started with wood. I use recycled materials as

pine wood. Then I paint with spray can and coat them with 2 component epoxy.

I attached a picture of one of my lures so that you can see what I'm talking about.

Tanks!!

As someone once suggested on this forum, your body on the back section needs to be thicker than the belly section ....... a V shape, if you view the bait from the front.

I just built my first 6, and 2 of them should be ready for pics. I will start a tread soon ...... Called Lipless DCVRs (Deceivers). They swim great, and have even better action on the drop (which is what I was keying on.

Mark's suggestion, along with the wedge shaped effect should cure your problems.

Edited by HAWGHUNNA

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Sorry, can't figure out how to delete this box :blink:

Thanks Mark I'll try if your groove trick enhances the wobble.

I strongly agree with Benton B, the position of the tying ring is critical. I usually

set it by suspending the lure and finding the balance point.

I will also make next lures V shaped as Hawgunna suggests.

What do you think about the location of the ballast. I always try to place the lead

as low as possible.

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When I'm trying to match the action of an existing lure, I always try to get my hands on one that's clear, so I can see the location ans size of the ballast and rattles without having to open up, and probably ruin, a good lure. You can also scrape the paint job off, and clean it with acetone, to make the innards more transparent.

When I'm adding ballast to a lure, I typically put on all the hardware and hooks, and then float test it. I add split shots, or egg sinkers, to the tines of the hooks until I get it to float or sink like I want it to.

Keeping the ballast as low as possible should help the lure to cast well, and to be stable on a faster retrieve. Exactly where to place the ballast is the $64K question that can really only be answered by trial and error.

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Their are two main variables, as you have already established, ballast location and tow eye location. The best aproach is to fix the ballast and vary the eye. If you cannot get it to work after trying all the eye variations, move the ballast and repeat all the eye locations. This is the way good lure design works. Theory can sometimes get you close, but their is no theory for this design.

When you get close to an action that works, it may be worth continuing the testing process beyond. You never know, their may be more, if not, it was a good learning exercise and you can call yourself an expert at this type of design, having fully explored ALL the possibilities. This of course, is up to you.

Having completed all the testing, you will find that you have a natural feel for the design and wonder why you had such problems before.

Dave

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look up the suicide shad on ebay the guy in NC is the only one who makes it now but I have a good friend who made the originals here in VA years ago thet are balsa now and have a great wobble and work better in grass than anything else hands down I would load some pics but my camera and computer are enemys and wont work nice together

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Is your bait wobbling at all? Or is it spiralling out of control? when I make my rattle baits I weight in the head of the bait. Try adding the weight behind the eye to infront of your line tie. Trial and error is what it will take to find the right weight.

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