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CedarLakeMusky

Etex And Jointed Lures

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I made my first jointed lure and put Etex on as a top coat. I fished it for the first time and after awhile I noticed the Etex was lifting where the two joints of the lure make contact. Mainly at the four corners. The rest of the lure seems fine. I scraped of the bad spots and recoated with Etex again. I left the lure set for a few days and fished it again. After a while the same thing happened it was lifting where the corners of the jointed lure would make contact. You can pick the Etex off with you finger nail down to the paint. Shouldn't Etex hold up better being it is flexible? Has anyone else had problems like this? I have put it on all my other lures with no lifting problems.

CLM

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No clear coat will hold up to continued banging among parts. Have you tried creating more room between the joints, beveling the joints, and/or rounding off the corners so that the clearcoat can get a better bite?

RM

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Those are all good ideas. I will try them out and see how it works.

Thanks RM

No clear coat will hold up to continued banging among parts. Have you tried creating more room between the joints, beveling the joints, and/or rounding off the corners so that the clearcoat can get a better bite?

RM

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No clear coat will hold up to continued banging among parts. Have you tried creating more room between the joints, beveling the joints, and/or rounding off the corners so that the clearcoat can get a better bite?

RM

I second these ideas.

I cut my joints on a 25 degree angle, with the point of the V facing forward.

That make a smoother looking joint, to me, than a flat faced joing, and the lures swim fine.

I try to make the front face of the following sections as rounded and smooth as possible, and round off the trailing edges of the front sections and smooth them, too.

In order to be able to coat the joints without gumming up the hinges, I coat the inner faces with D2T while the lure is disassembled, and lap it out onto the face about 1/4". That way, I can assemble the lure, mount it on my drying wheel, and coat the faces with the lure assembled. I typically do at least two coat of Etex. The one coat of D2T inside the joints is plenty. And I have both D2T and Etex at the points where the sections hit each other.

It works for me, but it's not bullet proof. Nothing is, as JM said.

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No clear coat will hold up to continued banging among parts. Have you tried creating more room between the joints, beveling the joints, and/or rounding off the corners so that the clearcoat can get a better bite?

RM

im with riverman on this also.

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You'd think I couldn't mispell RM, wouldn't you? Doh!!! :oooh:

Mark it could be worse, it could have been a one letter word. :lol::blink:

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Mark it could be worse, it could have been a one letter word. :lol::blink:

Now that IS funny!

How did you know?

You must have been the guy sitting next to me in English! :lol::lol::lol:

Edited by mark poulson

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I agree. The weakest point of the clear on any large jointed bait or swimbait is at the joint. The second weakest is everywhere else. LOL. On big swimbaits the lure weight alone kills you when you crash it into something. You can do everything in your power to get it right but if you beat the lure against rocks or docks its not going to stand up whether the lure is hand made or by a big company.

I typically let mine cure for 3-4 days after the last coat and usually use 2-3 coats. I have chipped clear off a few of my baits after some rugged abuse but did not have any problem with the paint or the bait. guess i cooked the paint right lol

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To Mark or anyone else. I have thought about putting a complete topcoat of D2T on the lure and then putting 2-3 coats of Etex. Have you ever tried this? Do you think this would make a tougher lure? Just thought I would put my idea out there. I am sure somebody out there has tried this.

Thanks for the help

CLM

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To Mark or anyone else. I have thought about putting a complete topcoat of D2T on the lure and then putting 2-3 coats of Etex. Have you ever tried this? Do you think this would make a tougher lure? Just thought I would put my idea out there. I am sure somebody out there has tried this.

Thanks for the help

CLM

CLM,

I tried D2T on the faces of my jointed swimbait lures, but it was too brittle, and cracked off in big sheets. That's why I switched to a decoupage epoxy, which is more flexible, for the big flat surfaces on the lures. I did use the D2T to coat the interior of the joints, because it would set up quickly and only needed one coat to cover really well, and I lapped it out 1/4" onto the faces of the lures to insure a good lap joint. That system worked really well.

Remember, D2T is, first and foremost, a glue, which means it needs to set up really hard and rigid. It's not designed to be spread over big, flat surfaces, like the other type of epoxy, decoupage, is meant to do.

And decoupage epoxy, like Etex, NuLustre, and even Flexcoat, is designed to expand and contract with the large wooden surfaces it covers, like table tops and counter tops, or to flex with the bending rods it covers.

I have used D2T for one piece lures, specifically cranks, and it holds up fine, as long as I don't smash them into rocks. Rock allergy is common among all lure topcoats. :lol:

I actually switched to PVC decking for lure building because it is totally waterproof, and so hard that it barely dents when it hits the rocks. Because it is waterproof, my finishes last a lot longer, even when I do rock "tests" with them. ;)

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