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rswell2

First Timer - Sanding Question

8 posts in this topic

I've just recently started working on my first project making poppers out of cedar. I turned them on the lathe, drilled all of the holes, and dipped them in 3 coats of poly. I realize that you're supposed to sand between coats, but I didn't. Luckily, I didn't have any problems. My next step is to spray with Rustoleum painter's touch ultra cover 2x primer.

My question now is what kind of sandpaper does everyone use during the process? Does it matter what I use at this step since I'm going to prime it? Will something like 220 grit work? Or should I go to the microgrits and use something like 400 or 500?

Thanks for your help,

Stephen

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If you are trying to wet sand you primer, use 400 grit wet or dry sandpaper, and wet sand the primer per the instructions.

The purpose of sanding is to get a more even surface for your finished paint job. If your lure is already smooth after you've primed it, there is no need to sand before you paint further. The primer is designed to promote a good bond with your paint without sanding.

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Well Im not sure if this will work with cedar but it works well with balsa. I use DEFT sanding sealer. Buy or build a tumbler that will hold several hundred baits. Turn the tumbler on and add some Deft sanding sealer. When the inside of the tumbler is coated well dump your baits in. let run for a while and then add some more sanding sealer. You have to check them occasionally because they have a tendency to stick together a little. After an hour or so add some more sealer and let it run. The liquid sanding sealer does two things: 1) seals the bait 2) the bait get sanded from the sanding sealer and the friction created from the bodies rubbing against each other. Presto! a few hundred baits sanded and sealed with no manual labor!

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I use 220 or 320 when sanding between coats. The 220 does leave visible sanding marks in the finished paint. The reason you need to sand between coats is not only to smooth out any bumps but to take off the gloss so the next coat can mechanically bond to the surface.

I am certainly no expert but ,having made every mistake possible, I would caution you about applying the spray rustoleum primmer over the poly. I am not sure why but the solvents in a lot of that stuff can cause the poly to reactivate and wrinkle up if its not completely cured.

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I use 220 or 320 when sanding between coats. The 220 does leave visible sanding marks in the finished paint. The reason you need to sand between coats is not only to smooth out any bumps but to take off the gloss so the next coat can mechanically bond to the surface.

I am certainly no expert but ,having made every mistake possible, I would caution you about applying the spray rustoleum primmer over the poly. I am not sure why but the solvents in a lot of that stuff can cause the poly to reactivate and wrinkle up if its not completely cured.

You can make sure the poly is set by using a hair dryer to heat set it like you do Createx, and then let it sit overnight.

Edited by mark poulson

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Well, last night I attempted to sand a few of the poly drips down. They were still soft in the core, even after letting them set out for a week. Needless to say, (to borrow a term from my dad) I boogered them up a little. The high spots didn't want to sand, they just wanted to glop about. I was able to use my fingernail and scrape off a little though.

Will these spots eventually harden to the point of being able to be sanded?

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Once you scrap off the drips, what's left should be thin enough to dry hard. Then you can sand it smooth, and redip it, making sure to let it hang vertically so the excess drips off the bottom hook hanger. The next day you should take an exacto knife, and cut around the hook hanger, to remove the thick drip that'll be there. Then let it dry, or hit it with a hair dryer to get it to dry faster.

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Try this process...

Make Cedar bait

Coat with epoxy let dry 24 hours

Sand with 360 grit wet sandpaper

Coat with epoxy let dry 24 hours again

Scuff lure with 360 grit lightly

Prime bait...if you see blimishes.... Get some bondo glazing putty and fill in blimishes and sand one more time.

then prime again.. after you happy with your primed body.

Paint bait

Clear coat bait

Hope this helps

The Rookie

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