CatchemCaro

Createx ?

11 posts in this topic

OK, I pulled the air brush out for the second time today. I had thought I cleaned the gun good last time I used it, but it seemed to clog instantly. I used Red paint. So after running some cleaner through the gun I get it to start working for a while. So then I got brave and cleaned the red out and went for some chartruse for some of my Sexxy Caro Henrieta baits. This worked OK, but it seemed as if it wanted to clog some. So my question is, can you use createx straight out of the jar and if so, whats the trick? Or do you simply thin your createx every time you use it? And if your thinning it, how are you going about it? Are you prethinning in a dixi cup and then pouring it into your gun or do you add paint to the gun and then a drop or two of the recomended thinner? Thanks lots for any good information.

Rich

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Before each days spraying, I check my airbrush operation by running clear water through it just to check it for being clean. I usually don't thin Createx, but some times it needs thinning. My air brush mounts the spray paint bottle to the bottom of the air brush so I thin the entire bottle so that it will spray. I usually don't have to rethin it. When I thin, I use water. Before you thin, run your air up to 40 lbs. of pressure to see if that will make it spray. If it doesn't, add a little water, stir, and try. If it doesn't spray, add more water. In case of a really dirty gun, lacquer thinner will clean most any airbrush paint if left sitting in it over night. This usually requires a complete disassembly to remove the soften paint. My paint seems thin when it sprays the best. Trial and error is how I learned. I'm sure someone on TU has a better system for determing how much thinner to use. Musky Glenn

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Hey Rich,

Since I started thinning my paint with Auto Air's 4011 reducer I've had almost zero problems with clogging while I'm spraying. Auto Air and Createx are made by the same company and their techs told me the Auto Air products were compatible with Createx. I don't have a set reduction formula as to how much reducer to add to a set amount of paint. I'm one of those "fly by the seat of your pants" kinda guys and just add reducer until it feels right and the paint sprays like I want it to. Most of my paint is bought in 4oz. bottles and I add reducer to the whole bottle of paint. I'd asked about this in an earlier post and was told that was how a lot of folks do it and it has been working for me.

It also sounds like your brush might not be completely clean either. You might want to buy some Createx Airbrush Restorer. The airbrush restorer will loosen any dried paint that might be left in your brush and make it much easier to clean. And it's reusable. I keep some sealed in a small glass jar and periodically soak my brush in it. Any gunk that comes out of your brush while it's in the jar will just sink to the bottom. Unless the brush is really gunked up you don't even have to take it apart. I just stick my airbrush down into the jar and let it soak for anywhere from an hour or so to as much as leaving it overnight.

I was having the same problems you described and the steps I've mentioned are what solved them for me. You can find what I'm talking about at the links below. I'm not pushing TCP's website. I'm sure you can find these products anywhere that sells Createx and Auto Air.

One other thing. While I'm painting I will run a bowl full of Acetone through my brush every few color changes. Some might think this is unnecessary or overkill, but I prefer to err on the side of caution. Since I started doing this I very rarely have to take my brush apart and clean it and I'd much rather go to a little bit of extreme than dealing with the frustration of tearing apart and cleaning a clogged airbrush.

good luck,

Ben

Auto Air 4011 Reducer

http://www.tcpglobal...utoair4000.aspx

Createx Airbrush Restorer

http://www.tcpglobal...nd-mediums.aspx

Edited by RayburnGuy

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Rayburn Guy, Thanks for the tip, I will also try those suggestions. Musky Glenn

Glad I could help. Hope it makes things easier for you.

Ben

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Thanks guys, once again some good usefull information. I was running around 20 or 25 PSI with my compressor. What are you using Rayburn? I plan on spending a few hours playing with my gun tomorrow. I think that by the end of this trial day I should have a little better feel for the Iwata's I have. Thanks again.

Rich

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Thanks guys, once again some good usefull information. I was running around 20 or 25 PSI with my compressor. What are you using Rayburn? I plan on spending a few hours playing with my gun tomorrow. I think that by the end of this trial day I should have a little better feel for the Iwata's I have. Thanks again.

Rich

I run acetone [.99 cents at the dollar store] through my brush anytime I have spray problems. You still have to pull the needle out and clean it at the end of each day. I generally spray createx right out of the bottle with a 3mm tip. At 20-25 psi I can spray the transparent paints and black, but any of the opie colors will clog. I either thin them or spray at a higher psi.

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Thanks guys, once again some good usefull information. I was running around 20 or 25 PSI with my compressor. What are you using Rayburn? I plan on spending a few hours playing with my gun tomorrow. I think that by the end of this trial day I should have a little better feel for the Iwata's I have. Thanks again.

Rich

By thinning my paint I'm able to go as low as 5 to 10 psi on my regulator. Not very often do I need to spray with pressure that low, but with properly thinned paint it is possible. Most of the time I'm using around 15 psi.

Gunnie is right about removing the needle to clean it after every spraying session. When I was talking about tearing the brush down in my earlier post I was talking about taking it completely apart. Your have to have a clean brush for it to spray properly and it's much easier in the long run if you keep it clean to start with. Let me know if I can help you with anything else.

good luck,

Ben

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Good tips all around and I will use some of them. I am on my 2nd year of spraying baits and the info here has really helped. Getting Createx thinned properly has helped me out immensely. My biggest problem is that the pearls will still sometimes clog my HP-C with .3 mm tip, but it works pretty well most of the time. I usually spray Createx in the 10 +/-4 psi range.

I did want to point out that Acetone is extremely flammable, so be careful if you are spraying that stuff. I work about 3 feet from my furnace in my basement, so that would not be a good idea for me. Booom!

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Good tips all around and I will use some of them. I am on my 2nd year of spraying baits and the info here has really helped. Getting Createx thinned properly has helped me out immensely. My biggest problem is that the pearls will still sometimes clog my HP-C with .3 mm tip, but it works pretty well most of the time. I usually spray Createx in the 10 +/-4 psi range.

I did want to point out that Acetone is extremely flammable, so be careful if you are spraying that stuff. I work about 3 feet from my furnace in my basement, so that would not be a good idea for me. Booom!

Even overspray from Createx can be dangerous near an open flame. Once it dries in the air, it's just a flamable dust.

Try to figure out some kind of contained spray area with venting.

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Here's how I avoid clogs: I spray at 60 PSI. That may seem a little excessive, but I rarely have clogs and I've never had trouble spraying pearl paint with the .3 tip I use. If the paint's too thick I just add some water, backwash a little to mix it in, and spray.

Something else that cuts down on clogs is to put some Isopropyl Alcohol in the airbrush bowl when not in use.

Hope this helps.

Ben

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