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Musky Lip

My First Lures...

13 posts in this topic

Here are my first three lures. I have been reading posts over the last month and I have learned a lot. Thank you everyone for passing along your knowlege to others. The only issue I am having is that you can still see the wood grain even after I use sanding sealer, and kills primer... any advise? Thanks

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P1030355.JPG

P1030348.JPG

P1030351.JPG

P1030355.JPG

P1030348.JPG

P1030351.JPG

P1030355.JPG

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P1030351.JPG

P1030355.JPG

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Here are my first three lures. I have been reading posts over the last month and I have learned a lot. Thank you everyone for passing along your knowlege to others. The only issue I am having is that you can still see the wood grain even after I use sanding sealer, and kills primer... any advise? Thanks

i use pvc for my baits ( no issues with grain ). you might try poplar wood. i used to use it when i first started. carves and sands easy and you won't have the grain issues as with a lot of other wood. also basswood is a popular wood to use.

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i use pvc for my baits ( no issues with grain ). you might try poplar wood. i used to use it when i first started. carves and sands easy and you won't have the grain issues as with a lot of other wood. also basswood is a popular wood to use.

I have been using oak because it needs less amount of lead... I am sure I will try different types of wood but I like oak because of its density and strength. I'm looking for some kind of product that will cover the grain so it doesn't show through the paint.

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I have been using oak because it needs less amount of lead... I am sure I will try different types of wood but I like oak because of its density and strength. I'm looking for some kind of product that will cover the grain so it doesn't show through the paint.

As time goes by and you build more lures, your work will get smoother. But for now, try using white paint for priming. Dip your lure in it, if the density is right, it should cover those little irregularities. Or use epoxy before painting, that should do it too. Oh and by the way, your lures look top notch. Great work. A little advice, try to put extra time in action of the lures, the "pro" finish will come with mileage.

Zolja

Edited by Zolja

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You need to use something that soaks into the surface and causes the grain to raise and fixes it with a hard surface that is easy to sand. This will allow you to sand off the peaks of the grain and because the surface is now fixed, they will not re-occur. A second coat and a light scuffing will give you the perfect surface for paint adhesion and no grain.

Common seal coats are: thinned epoxy, propionate pellets dissolved in acetone (gives a plastic coat), CA glue and their are many others that a search will expose. Personally, I like polyester resin. It is thin enough to soak into the surface, very cheap, rock hard, enough working time to apply to four or five bodies and ready for sanding in an hour. Whether it is considered a good solution I don't know, but I am only making stuff for myself.

Of all the above, you should try the thinned epoxy. True, it takes more time, but it will give you the result that you are looking for. Hopefully, others will jump in here and give more options and sound advise.

Dave

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As time goes by and you build more lures, your work will get smoother. But for now, try using white paint for priming. Dip your lure in it, if the density is right, it should cover those little irregularities. Or use epoxy before painting, that should do it too. Oh and by the way, your lures look top notch. Great work. A little advice, try to put extra time in action of the lures, the "pro" finish will come with mileage.

Zolja

I couldn't be happier with the action... I am just trying to perfect the paint jobs. I will try soaking the blanks in the sanding sealer to see if that works. Thanks

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If you're fishing for musky, which I've never actually seen in person, you need a lure that's hard.

I would use Dave's suggestion to seal with several coats of D2T epoxy, thinned with denatured alcohol 2pts epoxy/1pt alcohol. By the second coat, you should have a very smooth surface to paint. Just scuff it up with a scotch scouring pad, prime, and paint.

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I coat with etex before painting. Makes a smooth surface with no grain. The down side is the wait to paint. :angry:

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I coat with etex before painting. Makes a smooth surface with no grain. The down side is the wait to paint. :angry:

Yeah, I have one with etex on the wheel right now. I too do not like the fact that I have to wait 8 hours before paint.

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Yeah, I have one with etex on the wheel right now. I too do not like the fact that I have to wait 8 hours before paint.

That's one reason D2T, thinned, is a good alternative. It dries faster. Just don't over thin it.

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I know this is older, but oak also has a very open grain. It will take a good amount of filling to get rid of grain. Poplar has worked good for me and can be shaped well. If you really want to use a hardwood, cedar maybe?

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they look good. heres my process. we use cedar. it absorbs sealers and has corkier action. hardwoods dont accept sealers well. poplar has swelling tendencys when paint coats are broken. sand only to 150 grit. seal twice sanding before primer. primer dip. base coat dip. then airbrush patterns. then final coats. this is my humble process. its much easier doing batches of baits if possible. hope this gives you a few ideas.

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