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Mini Presto Pot

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I was on the search a while back for a smaller version of the Presto Pot for small batches. Yes, the microwave works fine, but there are issues. I seem to wind up over cooking all plastic eventually if I have to keep throwing them back in the microwave. Usually I can get about 4-5 recooks before it discolors and changes smell. For small volume molds a single cup of plastic can get recooked a lot more times than that just to use it up.

In the Presto Pot I can keep a batch of plastic at just the right temperature indefinitely... well long enough to nearly empty the pot. Even shooting only a couple molds at a time.

However, for small batches like one or two cups its a big pain. A cup of plastic in the bottom of a Presto Pot is pretty hard to pick up with an injector unless you tilt the pot. Even then its wasteful and potentially dangerous. I'm looking for something like a Presto Pot but about 6 inches deep and 3-4 inches in diameter would be great for those small batches.

I thought about making my own with band heaters and aluminum tube, but the killer is thermostats. I couldn't believe what a thermostat cost in that heat range to buy in onesy twosey quantities. The band heaters are dirt cheap by comparison.

Somebody on here suggested the Lee plastic pot. I bought two of them and they both suck. First off they are designed for hand pours so you have to remove the plunger and plug the hole in the bottom in order to even get an injector in the pot. Plugging the hole leaves a cleaning problem for later too. Then they take forever to come up to temperature, and don't seem to have any real thermostatic control you can count on then.

So...

Anybody know of a MINI Presto pot of something close to the dimensions I am looking for?

OR

Know where I can find a thermostatic control for the appropriate temperature range that doesn't cost an arm and a leg that I can use with some band heaters to make my own?

(I just happen to have some band heaters that will get that hot easily.)

I have some molds I made that are paired with a seperate tail mold. I shoot the tails in quantity, but low volume of plastic. Then later I can finish the baits. A cup of plastic makes enough tails for 100 baits give or take. I actually have several of my favorite molds that I made like this with seperate tail molds.

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I have not tried it yet but I want to get my hands on some heat transfer fluid for my presto pot and then you can make a wooden lid with any size insert, I think this would be great for say 3-4 color vertical tube dipping, I work at the local housing authority and the combustion dept has the fluid I think I need. Sorry for getting off target, have you seen the new presto pots they are smaller in diameter but I'm not sure by how much I'm sure somebody will chime in with the dimensions.

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Somebody on here suggested the Lee plastic pot. I bought two of them and they both suck. First off they are designed for hand pours so you have to remove the plunger and plug the hole in the bottom in order to even get an injector in the pot. Plugging the hole leaves a cleaning problem for later too. Then they take forever to come up to temperature, and don't seem to have any real thermostatic control you can count on then.

Couple ideas Bob...

First, why not tap the hole on the bottom and add a valve like we do on the prestos, that should help the clean out issue. Secondly, I was talking to a friend of mine who is in the handpour business. He said he heats his plastic in the micro and then transfers it into the lee pot for pouring for the exact reason you stated, the Lee takes too long to get to temp but seems to maintain it acceptably.

I do remember a thread somewhere about doing something to the Lee plastic pots to make them more temp stable, but I can't remember if it was here or on Del's website.

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I believe Longhorn has been using heat lamps for 25+ years. With that type of setup you could use any size/shape containers you'd like. http://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/17165-new-pouring-table/page__p__129929entry129929 Of course, you would have to rig up some sort of slide out system in order to fill the injector, or something.............

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I use 1100 watt hot plates and Lodge cast iron pouring pots. I couldn't be happier with them. The pots are pre-seasond, have pouring spouts on both sides and easily hold a cup of plastic with room to spare. Best of all cast iron heats nice and evenly. No hot spots.No scorching. G.E. hot plates. The kind with the solid steel burner. Not the heating coil style.

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At one time there was a pot on the market called a Fry Daddy its about half as big as a presto pot. So far I haven't had time or money to create a system that satisfies me. I don't want to worry about how long the plastic is in the pot, scorching or battling stirrers . I hope after the first I can get back to more nutty ideas. These holidays are starting to cause me to have alone time withdrawals.

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may be a little off topic but have any of you ever thought about using a mini fryer such as a fry daddy to melt/maintain your plastic? you can find them for around $25 with adjustable thermostats that will roughly hold 4 cups.

the other idea that i have is to use test tubes (large sizes) for hand dipping the lures to minimize waste. the tubes are cheap...

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toadfrog, i must have just hit send right after you. the fry daddy idea was recommended by a friend who said he knew of people using them to pour. i like the presto pots, but don't see any reason why the small (temp adjusted) fryer won't work, and it's a fraction of the cost.

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I recently saw a "mini" cooker in my travels around the world wide web.

Of course, when I try to find that item that I previously stumbled upon - it's nowhere to be found...

A Google search turned up this information.

It may be of some help.

Good luck!

Rick

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Bob,

You can also look at electric fondue and/or tempura pots. They will usually heat to at least 400 degrees.

What About this Presto Pot that has temperature control at Walmart for $30? (Amazon.com too)

Might work good for small batches that are sucked up with an injector.

The only thing I am not sure of is the inside surface. It is aluminum and not teflon.

link

Jack

Edited by jsbass

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The only thing I am not sure of is the inside surface. It is aluminum and not teflon.

Aluminum might even be better as it will not scrap off as many Teflon coatings will.

Only problem you will still run into is your flake falling to the bottom. Maybe a mini-stirrer is in order as well. :D

Jim

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Aluminum might even be better as it will not scrap off as many Teflon coatings will.

Only problem you will still run into is your flake falling to the bottom. Maybe a mini-stirrer is in order as well. :D

Jim

The Fry Daddy does not have an adjustable heat range so you have to change the thermostat so you don't over heat.

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The Fry Daddy does not have an adjustable heat range so you have to change the thermostat so you don't over heat.

It has been years ago but I thought some on the forum had used the fry daddy. I thought there was thermostat set screw you had to get to from the underside. Break away a plastic/epoxy drop and then use a screw driver to dial it in?

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may be a little off topic but have any of you ever thought about using a mini fryer such as a fry daddy to melt/maintain your plastic? you can find them for around $25 with adjustable thermostats that will roughly hold 4 cups.

the other idea that i have is to use test tubes (large sizes) for hand dipping the lures to minimize waste. the tubes are cheap...

This is the post I was replying too when I said "the Fry Daddy does not have an adjustable heat range so you have to change the thermostat so you don't over heat".

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It has been years ago but I thought some on the forum had used the fry daddy. I thought there was thermostat set screw you had to get to from the underside. Break away a plastic/epoxy drop and then use a screw driver to dial it in?

Mine did not have a screw driver adjustment. I cut out the original thermostat and put in one with a lower range. I will try to find out what it was that I used. I think the receipt is in the basement.

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Mine did not have a screw driver adjustment. I cut out the original thermostat and put in one with a lower range. I will try to find out what it was that I used. I think the receipt is in the basement.

I bought my thermostat from Patriot Supply. To see an eBay auction for a disc thermostat look at 380243910136.

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I bought my thermostat from Patriot Supply. To see an eBay auction for a disc thermostat look at 380243910136.

MP10001883151_P255045_500X500.jpg

This one has an adjustable thermostat.

From Presto:

Brushed stainless steel exterior. Anodized aluminum interior for fast, even heating.

Space-saving 1-liter size.

Adjustable thermostat for easy selection of the desired frying temperature.

Handy indicator light lets you know when the fryer is plugged in.

Vented cool-touch cover with built-in spatter screen. Fries with the cover closed to reduce odor and spattering.

Oil capacity: 1 liter (1.1 quarts).

One year limited warranty.

120 Volts AC, 1000 Watts

STOCK NO. 05470

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MP10001883151_P255045_500X500.jpg

This one has an adjustable thermostat.

From Presto:

Brushed stainless steel exterior. Anodized aluminum interior for fast, even heating.

Space-saving 1-liter size.

Adjustable thermostat for easy selection of the desired frying temperature.

Handy indicator light lets you know when the fryer is plugged in.

Vented cool-touch cover with built-in spatter screen. Fries with the cover closed to reduce odor and spattering.

Oil capacity: 1 liter (1.1 quarts).

One year limited warranty.

120 Volts AC, 1000 Watts

STOCK NO. 05470

I didn't know they updated it. Does the stainless steel exterior come off so you can put a valve in the side?

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I bought my thermostat from Patriot Supply. To see an eBay auction for a disc thermostat look at 380243910136.

MOTOR RATING (FULL LOAD)

RESISTIVE (NON-INDUCTIVE)

PILOT DUTY

120VAC

240VAC

120/240VAC

277VAC

120/240/277VAC

10.0A

5.0A

25.0A

21.6A

125 VA

Seems like it should handle it. 25 amps for a resistive load (heating element) is plenty. More than your regular household outlet can provide. What about the temperature range? 350F seems awfully high to me. How did it work out in practice?

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