Net Man

Top Coat Questions!

7 posts in this topic

I have read on here many times about top coats and what is better and all of that. I started using automotive clear and it worked great but did not have the depth to it like D2T. So than I used D2T and found that it would yellow over time. Now I use the D2T and spray one coat of automotive clear over it to keep it from yellowing over time. Does anyone know what Tim Hughes or Dale Sellers are using? These guys baits look great and hold up well.

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Well, you could PM Tim, whose handle here on TU is Hughsey, and ask.

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I use several different clear coats depending on what style bait I'm clear coating. For Cranks I use a 2 part polymer that a chemist friend of mine makes to my specs. It has a uv additive added to it to help keep it from yellowing. For stickbaits and some topwaters, I use Dick Nites. For production work we use a uv curing epoxy.

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Yeah Hughsey, I wish I knew what that 2 part polymer was. Years ago I read where you sent a bait to some people to do a review on. They took it outside and threw it into the air twice to see how the clear held up. All I have to say is... Impressive. Being the old hard head that I am... I am still using Devcon. I use auto clear on some baits with sharp edges, (Devcon does not like sharp edges). DN takes too long to cure. UV is expensive. I really checked into that years ago and was ready to fork out the money. But then I found out about having to replace bulbs and power supplies. Ugh. Keep up the good work. Good to see you here on the site.

Skeeter

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I use several different clear coats depending on what style bait I'm clear coating. For Cranks I use a 2 part polymer that a chemist friend of mine makes to my specs. It has a uv additive added to it to help keep it from yellowing. For stickbaits and some topwaters, I use Dick Nites. For production work we use a uv curing epoxy.

Does the uv curing process heat the lure?

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Mark,

Yes the uv curing does heat the lure but not very much. They cure in 5 seconds and the light is about 1600 degrees. The lure are about 6 inches from the light and comes out just warm to touch.

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