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Epoxies

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Are all epoxies created equal? Ive been using a 5 min epoxy to top coat some of my lures before painting. With this being said it seems I have to sand and reapply a time or two. Whats happening is Im getting bubbles(not many) and small areas seem not to have been covered(almost like it fisheyes). Am I mixing to fast, not enough or ????? The epoxy Ive been using is from the Hobby Lobby and is a in store brand I guess(not Devcon).

Thanks

Lee

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I think most epoxies are similar if they look similar in the package. I like 5 min epoxy for gluing only. I like the 30-60 min epoxies for finish work. It gives more working time and doesn't seem to trap air before they pop. I mix mine on a flat surface and stir it quickly with the same brush that I am going to apply it with. This just doesn't seem to create many air bubbles. Musky Glenn

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I think most epoxies are similar if they look similar in the package. I like 5 min epoxy for gluing only. I like the 30-60 min epoxies for finish work. It gives more working time and doesn't seem to trap air before they pop. I mix mine on a flat surface and stir it quickly with the same brush that I am going to apply it with. This just doesn't seem to create many air bubbles. Musky Glenn

Musky Glenn - I'm just starting to get into lure building. But I've built a few fishing rods. Part of the finishing of decorative wraps and guide foot wraps is to use 2 part epoxy finishes. There are several rod building web sites forums on using epoxy also had questions and answers about bubbles. Basically what people do is use 2 part expoxies that cures in several hours not minutes. The rods are put on a slow rotating lathe for the expoxy to level out for a smooth finish. When mixing the 2 part epoxy the advise is to stirr slowly but completly so not to introduce air into the mix. Use solid plastic or metal stirring sticks. Next some pour the expoxy onto a pieces of flat aluminum foil. This allows the expoxy to flow out flat which helps release bubbles that may have been introduced during mixing. Sometime when I see tiny bubbles in the epoxy that won't release due to surface tension I will take a soda straw and blow on the surface. The heat will often release the bubbles. Also make sure the brushing technique you use does not create bubbles. Going at it fast may introduce some timy bubbles. Then some guys will use some heat right after the application using alcohol lamps, (not cig lighters-can overheat and add smut on the finish), or air guns (not too close as too much air will circulate dust in the air onto the finish.) Granted the rod wrapping finishes are not as hard of finish as exposies used for lures. Rod finishes may be a bit flexibile to handle the bending of the rod during use.

Also no two epoxy brands and cure times are not the same in my opinion. They may be close but reaction times, viscosities and bonding characteristics will vary. Why would they sell so many different types?

Another issue that can introduce bubbles is incompatibility with whatever was used underneath. And that has been discussed here before.

Part of the fun of lure building is experimenting and developing techniques that work for you. I had to try different rod finishes until I found one that I like and refine a technique to use that finish. Part of the learning curve. What I see is there is no one right or wrong way. Alot depends on where you live, the availability of materials, temperature, the shop or room you do the work. All this I think impacts the results. The big box lumber and home supply houses in my area don't carry the brands recommended by builders on this board. But I did find them at one independent hardware store.

In rod building I seen posts that poops on one brand of finish and method of application while another post says it as great as having two pockets on a shirt. I find I can spend all my time trying to find THE answer when in reality its just dive in and lay down some epoxy then do some analysis and learn from it to find out what works for me. Hope some of the ideas from rod building help.

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Lee, I often use Devcon 2 Ton (30 min) epoxy for undercoating raw wood. It cures slowly enough that it self-levels and yields a nice smooth undercoat - which 5 min epoxy will not (as you found). I thin D2T with denatured alcohol to extend its brushing time and help it penetrate the wood. Mix up a batch, thin it to your desired brushing viscosity, and you can undercoat 5-6 bass lures, no problem. Of course, a lure turner is absolutely a must if you are applying thinned epoxies. The D2T will cure hard enough to apply a 2nd coat in 2-3 hours (if needed), and you can lightly sand it after about 8 hrs (curing at 70 degrees or above) to prep it for painting.

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Thanks guys for the responses. Bob you tipped me off to my problem. I dont have a turner as of yet so that why Ive been using the 5 min stuff. I got a motor just havent had time to get the other parts I need to get my turner going. Thanks again.

Lee

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Just be sure the 5 minute epoxy you use is water proof, not just water resistant.

Devcon 5 minute epoxy is only water resistant, while their 30 minute epoxy is water proof.

You can google Decon and check the spec. sheets for the two.

I used the 5 minute to glue in some hardware on a lure, and it got soft and punky from water over time.

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