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jtilley

How To Make Professional Looking Wooden Baits

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:) Hey guys I am new to the tackle making world, and I would like some info on how to produce a professional looking lure. I have hand whittled , and hand painted a couple dozen wooden plugs. Some look and perform good, others do not, lol. I have recently acquired a bandsaw , and it really speeds up the process :) . I am looking for info on paints, clearcoats , etc. I like trying to copy some of the vintage lure styles, and paint schemes. I also am interested in making deep diving crankbaits, I have whittled out a few blanks, but have no idea as to where to place the plastic lip, counterweights, tuning , etc. This looks like the place to find all typrs of good info. :) I'm looking forward to your responses, thanks in advance. :)

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I am fairly new at wood lure building also. I already had a bandsaw so shaping lures was easier. I wish the sanding and finishing wasn't so tedious, but that is very important to getting a good looking lure. I also have been hand painting lures, but just purchased an airbrush. My opinion is I think you need an airbrush to get a better paint job. Hand painting has to many straight lines between colors and not as even of a coat. I think you can blend colors better with an airbrush. Water based paints are easier to work with. You want a good wood sealer before you prime or paint. I have tried D2T as a topcoat, but thought it was to brittle for pike/musky lures. I think D2T works great for and extra seal coat. It also has some build so it hides some sanding imperfections before you prime and paint. You can sand it after is cures so primer/paint adheres. I personally like Etex for a topcoat, but have not tried all of them yet. It takes a few coats but it is not as brittle and more flexible over wood. I am experimenting with counterweights. But what I have learned so far is putting the weight towards the back will make it cast farther with less dive. Putting the weight towards the front will cast shorter with more dive. Also where you put the weight changes the action of the lure. I think alot of that is trial and error. Lips are also trial and error. What I have learned is the more horizontal the lip is the deeper the lure drives, but the shape of the lip and how bouyant your lure is also plays a role in the action. LIke I said earlier, I am fairly new at lure building also, but I hope this helps. Really when you look at the whole picture, it is all alot of trial and error.

CLM

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I am fairly new at wood lure building also. I already had a bandsaw so shaping lures was easier. I wish the sanding and finishing wasn't so tedious, but that is very important to getting a good looking lure. I also have been hand painting lures, but just purchased an airbrush. My opinion is I think you need an airbrush to get a better paint job. Hand painting has to many straight lines between colors and not as even of a coat. I think you can blend colors better with an airbrush. Water based paints are easier to work with. You want a good wood sealer before you prime or paint. I have tried D2T as a topcoat, but thought it was to brittle for pike/musky lures. I think D2T works great for and extra seal coat. It also has some build so it hides some sanding imperfections before you prime and paint. You can sand it after is cures so primer/paint adheres. I personally like Etex for a topcoat, but have not tried all of them yet. It takes a few coats but it is not as brittle and more flexible over wood. I am experimenting with counterweights. But what I have learned so far is putting the weight towards the back will make it cast farther with less dive. Putting the weight towards the front will cast shorter with more dive. Also where you put the weight changes the action of the lure. I think alot of that is trial and error. Lips are also trial and error. What I have learned is the more horizontal the lip is the deeper the lure drives, but the shape of the lip and how bouyant your lure is also plays a role in the action. LIke I said earlier, I am fairly new at lure building also, but I hope this helps. Really when you look at the whole picture, it is all alot of trial and error.

CLM

Thanks alot CLM, every tip helps :) It has been said to learn from the mistakes of others, because we don't have time to make them all ourselves :). Where do I get the D2T, or Etex. up until now I have been using clear wood sealer, but it seems to tint my colors. Thanks Again, Jtilley

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Thanks alot CLM, every tip helps :) It has been said to learn from the mistakes of others, because we don't have time to make them all ourselves :). Where do I get the D2T, or Etex. up until now I have been using clear wood sealer, but it seems to tint my colors. Thanks Again, Jtilley

Ok, I've been reading on the forums, and I'm starting to get the lingo.....D2T = Devcon 2 Ton, and Etex = Envirotex Lite. I believe I can find those..........

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Ok, I've been reading on the forums, and I'm starting to get the lingo.....D2T = Devcon 2 Ton, and Etex = Envirotex Lite. I believe I can find those..........

Devcon is very easy to find just go to any hardware store you should be able to find it. Not to sure about Enviro Tex but Devcon is great to use just gotta work fast to put it on.

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Having made a wooden boat using a lot of epoxy, I learned that I had to finish with paint or varnish because epoxy exposed to the UV from sunlight, eventually discolors, turns very brittle, and disintegrates.

Has this been an issue for anyone using D2T for a topcoat?

D.J.

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DJ- I think the general experience with epoxied baits has been that it may eventually yellow (particularly if not measured/mixed well) but it can protect a bait for many years. Baits aren't exposed to sun and weather like boats; they get very limited UV exposure in most cases and being small, are not as affected by temperature expansion/contraction. I have 12 yr old epoxied baits that still look and perform fine. Old epoxy does eventually become brittle and more subject to impact damage, but that's a weakness shared by all topcoats. Btw, there are some higher priced epoxies that include UV inhibitors (e.g. Nu Lustre, some rod guide epoxies).

I'm not saying epoxy is a perfect topcoat but it remains a good choice for many baits.

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Ok, I've been reading on the forums, and I'm starting to get the lingo.....D2T = Devcon 2 Ton, and Etex = Envirotex Lite. I believe I can find those..........

Where is the dictionary / Encyclopedia for all the Acronyms ??

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Where is the dictionary / Encyclopedia for all the Acronyms ??

just keep reading the forums , and after awhile it starts making sense........ lol

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just keep reading the forums , and after awhile it starts making sense........ lol

My nickname is Do.

Besides I like dollars..:blink:

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