onlyonmonday

Hard Or Soft Wood

17 posts in this topic

I am about to do some prototypes and wondering what woods (Soft Or Hard) that should NOT be used.. :blink:

Also would it matter if it is a Top Water, Diver, or Brand of swimming thing attacks it ?? :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just read through all your posts to date and realise that you are just having a laugh, to put it politely.

V

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just read through all your posts to date and realise that you are just having a laugh, to put it politely.

V

You are wrong.. I do NOT understand why it is so very hard for MOST to be able to do anything but to NOT communicate..

I am guessing that any kind of wood can be used for a lure..

To bad I have to guess at answers..

Edited by onlyonmonday

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are wrong.. I do NOT understand why it is so very hard for MOST to be able to do anything but to NOT communicate..

I am guessing that any kind of wood can be used for a lure..

To bad I have to guess at answers..

You should read back through your own posts and then maybe you will understand how I arrived at my conclusion. Today, however, your posts wizened up and I hope that they stay that way. I am more than willing to spend many hours on answering some questions, as you will see even just looking through the last few days posts. But I hate wasting my time. I spent at least a couple of hours reading up on dimmer switches, wading through and trying to understand some very technical stuff, so that I might be able to explain Why ordinary light dimmers are not suitable. That was not a complete waste, as I can now link back to that thread in future.

The final straw was your current thread on jig prices. What an appalling thread. Basically, “I’ve got some jigs to sell, I’m not telling you how many, what type or what size etc. I am too busy’ to spend five minutes of my time to take a photograph, but I would like sensible offers please”. This prompted me to look back through your posts, only to find that just about every post was equally silly.

I have been accused of a lot of things in my time, but ‘not communicating’ was never one of them.

As for this thread, “what woods (Soft Or Hard) that should NOT be used”? What a strange question, considering the plethora of woods growing on this planet. “Also would it matter if it is a Top Water, Diver, or Brand of swimming thing attacks it”? Not sure what that means at all. This again just leads me to the conclusion that you are trying to waste peoples time for your own entertainment.

I suspect the glaring lack of replies to your question may have something to do with other members arriving at the same conclusions as me, maybe not. But I hope you think about what you are writing in the future. So giving you the benefit of my obviously considerable doubt, back to the question:

Which woods are most suitable would have been a better question. As you mentioned in post No3, any wood can be used for a lure, but there are properties that make some woods more suitable than others. But just about any wood can be made to swim.

The first consideration is the density for your particular application. Top water poppers are better made of lighter woods, gliders and ‘walk the dog’ style lures are better with medium to heavier woods, as the weight needs to be more evenly distributed for function. Another function of density is the ‘action’ that is required. If you want wide action, then lighter woods are better. But some days/waters a more subtle action fares better and a heavier wood might be a better choice.

It would seem logical that deep divers would require a heavy wood, but the density of the wood has very little to do with the depth it will swim. It is all about lip geometry, tow eye location and ballast location. Two identical lures that sit in the water the same depth, one made of low, the other high density wood, both will weigh the same.

Other considerations of wood choice, is its workability, is it easy to carve, is the grain a problem. Health issues, all wood dust can hurt you, but some more than others. Price, availability, Some woods are oily, causing paint problems, the list goes on.

Some of the common woods preferred are: balsa (dense), basswood, beach, birch, cedar (various types), cypress, elm, fir, mahogany, maple, oak, pine, poplar, redwood, spruce. These are woods that have been mentioned in TU threads. Those typed in blue are the more common.

A discussion could be had on each of them, so I will leave you to do some research, to find the most suitable for you. Do not limit yourself to TU searches, Google the individual woods for more detailed information on workability and applications.

Here is a link to some properties of woods to get you started: http://www.csudh.edu...mdata/woods.htm

Dave

Edited by Vodkaman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info..

It is to bad you have concluded and that is the end of story for you..

Instead of me telling of my thoughts I conclude I will just stay away from trying to ask anyone to respond even if it may mean them asking what I meant of my question..

About the jigs I did say how many I have, colors, etc etc but seems that that also was NOT understood..

I JUST wanted to get an idea of what to go for with price and was NOT selling them in that thread... If anyone noticed it was NOT in the 4 sale postings..

Less than a penny a piece was GEEZ ya think a bit out of the mind..

I will just lurk instead of being involved..

Edited by onlyonmonday

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'monday,

Lurk all you want. I've learned an awful lot just sitting back and watching what everyone else has to say.

One of the things I've learned is Dave, aka Vodkaman (as well as several of the other members) spends quite a bit of time explaining theory and practice. I'm sure he doesn't need me to defend him but you seem to have an attitude. As a newer member, you should watch the forum for a while, search before you ask and read your own posts before you send them. Some of your comments and questions have me scratching my head. I can't tell if you're speaking in riddles or are just struggling to articulate your thoughts.

Once the snow melts and can get out of the house I wish you tight lines, my friend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave,

After your post I couldn't sit by on this one. I agree completely with you. Most of these types of posts I dont even bother with but certainly didnt want you standing out on your own.

onlyonmonday,

Dont let it get the better of you. There is some good advise in this thread. If I can offer some assistance it would be to master the search feature. When I started searching the info wasn't coming as well as I thought, however, once you get the hang of it there is more info than I imagined in there. In my experience,

1. To search specifically, enclose your search in inverted commas

2. Remember that a search will typically be automatically limited by the system. In my experience its about 1 year or less of history. Nothing you can do about this as I understand it.

3. Use the advanced search always instead of the generic. That will allow you to change the way the results are displayed, filter to the sub-forum and select the date to search.

4. I have also observed that even if you search between a specific date, depending on the search term, the system will automatically limit your search to a specific number of results.

Sometimes I find myself searching from 6 month periods all way back to 2004.

Angus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave,

After your post I couldn't sit by on this one. I agree completely with you. Most of these types of posts I dont even bother with but certainly didnt want you standing out on your own.

onlyonmonday,

Dont let it get the better of you. There is some good advise in this thread. If I can offer some assistance it would be to master the search feature. When I started searching the info wasn't coming as well as I thought, however, once you get the hang of it there is more info than I imagined in there. In my experience,

1. To search specifically, enclose your search in inverted commas

2. Remember that a search will typically be automatically limited by the system. In my experience its about 1 year or less of history. Nothing you can do about this as I understand it.

3. Use the advanced search always instead of the generic. That will allow you to change the way the results are displayed, filter to the sub-forum and select the date to search.

4. I have also observed that even if you search between a specific date, depending on the search term, the system will automatically limit your search to a specific number of results.

Sometimes I find myself searching from 6 month periods all way back to 2004.

Angus

Now that is a help to me, ALSO..

I have been in health issues and maybe that could be the issue.. Time will tell..

Thanks all..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of us would hesitate to say what wood NOT to use because guys use such a wide variety. There are several "classic" crankbait woods that are used for good reason: balsa, basswood, and cedar are popular in the U.S. I suggest using a wood that has density that works well in the particular bait you're building. Light wood for shallow diving baits where high buoyancy is an asset, hardwood for deep divers that are easier to shape and finish. Stick with one wood and you'll build better crankbaits as you learn how to use it over a series of builds: how to shape it, how to design good baits from it, how to finish it. It's worth buying good kiln dried wood in enough quantity to last you awhile because its consistency will pay dividends as you learn the craft and you will come to understand that only good raw materials make good crankbaits. The price of wood and other raw materials that go into a crankbait is nothing compared to the time and effort you'll put into building it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of us would hesitate to say what wood NOT to use because guys use such a wide variety. There are several "classic" crankbait woods that are used for good reason: balsa, basswood, and cedar are popular in the U.S. I suggest using a wood that has density that works well in the particular bait you're building. Light wood for shallow diving baits where high buoyancy is an asset, hardwood for deep divers that are easier to shape and finish. Stick with one wood and you'll build better crankbaits as you learn how to use it over a series of builds: how to shape it, how to design good baits from it, how to finish it. It's worth buying good kiln dried wood in enough quantity to last you awhile because its consistency will pay dividends as you learn the craft and you will come to understand that only good raw materials make good crankbaits. The price of wood and other raw materials that go into a crankbait is nothing compared to the time and effort you'll put into building it.

Word that! (Hahaha I've always wanted to say that!)

But everything Bob said is true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a top-water lure guy-all northern white cedar. However, I really enjoy other woods. Some day I would like to get into using the lathe on heavier woods(musky lures only). At this point, I have no knowledge on how to make these sinking type of lures. No problem. My question to you: Has anyone used Yew wood and or Buckthorn for lure construction? I have several pieces of this wood. The growth rings intrigue me as they are very tight together. Thus a heavier wood. I did lathe buckthorn a few times for the heck of it and was very pleased to see how it turned out. I am going to try the yew wood. Any thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Word that! (Hahaha I've always wanted to say that!)

But everything Bob said is true.

Lol. Mark you got your slang off a bit! Word or word up would work there. haha info for next time :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I built a couple of baits with Tupelo Gum and more recently, Poplar. I make duck decoys so tupelo is what I had on hand. My next bait will be out of "sinker cypress". Anyone ever use that? The wood could easily be over a thousand years old.

Lol. Mark you got your slang off a bit! Word or word up would work there. haha info for next time :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lol. Mark you got your slang off a bit! Word or word up would work there. haha info for next time :D

You mean even when I'm hip, I'm not? Figures... :lol:

When I grow up, I'm gonna be young, good looking, rich, and hip!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poster #4 gave a website of http://www.csudh.edu/oliver/chemdata/woods.htm ..

Now I am confused all this time and have to dare to ask another question or two..

1.. WHAT THE ??

2.. Is there a work sheet somewhere to give a better description of buoyancy ??

I found one page that gave how to do some numbers but that still is confusing to me..

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100411155711AA345AN

Sorry for being old (53) and senile ®..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This may or may not help, but the #4 chart you reference to has some good information concerning buoyancy. Density, g/cc is a percentage of that wood to an equal amount of water. Alder is listed as .38 which means it is 38% as heavy as an equal amount of water. I believe this also means that a piece of Alder (when dry) will sit with 38% of itself underwater and 62% above water (approximately). Musky Glenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This may or may not help, but the #4 chart you reference to has some good information concerning buoyancy. Density, g/cc is a percentage of that wood to an equal amount of water. Alder is listed as .38 which means it is 38% as heavy as an equal amount of water. I believe this also means that a piece of Alder (when dry) will sit with 38% of itself underwater and 62% above water (approximately). Musky Glenn

Thank you for the info.. Seriously !!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now