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Crymdawg

Jo-ann's Fafabric & Craft Paint For Airbrush

18 posts in this topic

Crymdawg    10

I'm just getting into airbrushing and don't have lots of extra $$ to throw around or away. So a few weeks ago I was at a Jo-Ann's Fabric & Crafts store and bought several bottles of their store brand of water based Acrylic paints. I thinned them with a bit of water but the results look VERY THIN in the color of choice. They also have the PLAID brand of paints but trying to start out small. I know that "you get what you pay for" result wise. At $2+ dollars a bottle for Createx my learning curve will be VERY LONG. In there a known ratio of paint to water for thinning that will work. I'm using a harbor Freight airbrush with a .035 tip.

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Musky Glenn    124

Most Createx paints come pretty close to how it needs to be thinned. Open a bottle of Createx and try to match that. To thick won't spray through the airbrush, add more water in small amounts. To thin and it runs easy and doesn't cover well, add more paint, stir and try again. I know that isn't the answer you were looking for, but the thickness of different paints is not uniform, some just need more thinning than others. You will develope an eye for how thick it needs to be. I would rather be on the thin side than the thick side. If it is to thick, it won't spray enough to tell what you need to do. Have a scrape area to test spray the airbrush at so you can get it adjusted before you point it at anything important. I found that I wanted to spray to heavy of a coat when learning. Spray light coats, dry, spray again. It is amazing how much better paint looks after you put the clear coat on, especially black. Keep a damp rag handy and wash it off and do it over. One thing I learned from Tiger was to get the basic pattern good, add a top coat of clear and do the rest of the pattern and that is as far down as you need to remove paint if you mess up after that point. Good luck

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jwfflipper    23

I'm just getting into airbrushing and don't have lots of extra $$ to throw around or away. So a few weeks ago I was at a Jo-Ann's Fabric & Crafts store and bought several bottles of their store brand of water based Acrylic paints. I thinned them with a bit of water but the results look VERY THIN in the color of choice. They also have the PLAID brand of paints but trying to start out small. I know that "you get what you pay for" result wise. At $2+ dollars a bottle for Createx my learning curve will be VERY LONG. In there a known ratio of paint to water for thinning that will work. I'm using a harbor Freight airbrush with a .035 tip.

I have found Do-itmolds.com has a airbrush paint the is made for airbrushing and it is as good as createx.it is a very good paint, it flows really well and is a "little expensive" but it does really good. And they also have a top coat that I use which is a very good top coat and they told me that a lot of big name lure companies use their products. you can call them @ 1-319-984-6055

or you can call CS coatings which is a sister company @ 1-800-255-3924 or website ...www.csipaints.com and check out their line of paints.

Hope this helps

Jeff Francis

RiverValleyCrankbaits

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mark poulson    1,681

I try to stick with fabric paints that are heat set. After heat setting, the paint is waterproof, so the clothes can be washed.

If it's labeled fabric paint, and has iron-setting instructions, it should work fine.

When in doubt, ask someone on the store's staff.

Edited by mark poulson

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21xdc    109

I have seen this paint, but never tried it. I have never had the need to heat set my paints. I do put them on a turner when I'm doing a batch. I have a floor space heater blowing on them as they turn, but they dont get much heat.

Edited by 21xdc

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Crymdawg    10

All I use is craft paint.. I find using water or windex to thin works just fine. Some colors you can thin more than others. I thin as little as I can get away with.

http://www.bbcboards.net/zerothread?id=613087

http://www.bbcboards.net/zerothread?id=605292

Saw your post on the other site. How do the faucet aerators help you in putting the thinned paint back into the bottle ?? I do get some lumps in my thinned paint. I use water so far. Have not tried Windex like products or floor wax like other have mentioned in other posts. How about you ??

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BobP    808

I think you'll find some generic craft paint shoots OK through a .35mm tip but some won't, however much you thin it. If you thin it too much, it will lose its ability to form a uniform film. Airbrush paint has smaller grains of pigment and flow enhancers while craft paint is designed to be brushed. You won't know which colors in a craft paint brand will work and which won't until you try them. If it works on one bottle, it may not on the next you buy of the same color. If half the paint you buy can't be used, it cost about as much as buying airbrush paint. Something to think about. I started out with craft paint and a larger tip airbrush than yours. I persevered and overcame the limitations. Later, I got a small tip (.2mm) airbrush, and craft paint became a non-issue because it simply would not work at all. Ever. Not saying craft paint can't work, just that it isn't ideal.

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21xdc    109

I think you'll find some generic craft paint shoots OK through a .35mm tip but some won't, however much you thin it. If you thin it too much, it will lose its ability to form a uniform film. Airbrush paint has smaller grains of pigment and flow enhancers while craft paint is designed to be brushed. You won't know which colors in a craft paint brand will work and which won't until you try them. If it works on one bottle, it may not on the next you buy of the same color. If half the paint you buy can't be used, it cost about as much as buying airbrush paint. Something to think about. I started out with craft paint and a larger tip airbrush than yours. I persevered and overcame the limitations. Later, I got a small tip (.2mm) airbrush, and craft paint became a non-issue because it simply would not work at all. Ever. Not saying craft paint can't work, just that it isn't ideal.

I dont think it's ideal to have to mix colors to get what I want... Hard to duplicate and be consistant too... Air brush paint limits my color options. So when I buy a $0.99 bottle of craft paint and thin it, I get near double the volume. :)

They are not faucet aereators... But they do have a rubber washer on them and it comes off to put the paint back into the bottle. Works like a charm. I have been using some future and windex in my paint, But I dont need it.

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t_miller316    10

i use the craft paint that you get at Michaels, and the Apple barrel Brand you get at wally world (.59 per bottle) and they work just fine with a little thinning. You will need to experiment to get the consistency your gun needs

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68KingFisher    13

I think you'll find some generic craft paint shoots OK through a .35mm tip but some won't, however much you thin it. If you thin it too much, it will lose its ability to form a uniform film. Airbrush paint has smaller grains of pigment and flow enhancers while craft paint is designed to be brushed. You won't know which colors in a craft paint brand will work and which won't until you try them. If it works on one bottle, it may not on the next you buy of the same color. If half the paint you buy can't be used, it cost about as much as buying airbrush paint. Something to think about. I started out with craft paint and a larger tip airbrush than yours. I persevered and overcame the limitations. Later, I got a small tip (.2mm) airbrush, and craft paint became a non-issue because it simply would not work at all. Ever. Not saying craft paint can't work, just that it isn't ideal.

BobP, pretty much nailed it......

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In there a known ratio of paint to water for thinning that will work. I'm using a harbor Freight airbrush with a .035 tip.

When I was teaching students to mix paint for their brushes, I'd tell them to aim for the consistency of 2% milk. That was using Createx, but that's the 'ratio' you're looking at. The problem with craft paints is the pigments may be too large too shoot well at that thickness, and the binders in the paint may not work when thinned to that rate. It's trial and error, and I've always come back to proper airbrush paints... My 1/50th of a buck.

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.dsaavedra.    10

Thank you... Sometimes you just have to think outside the box. :lol:http://www.bbcboards.net/zerothread?id=625968

wow, that is just awesome! i need to scrounge up some of that stuff. i know my mom has some but i think hers is just the kind with square holes, but i know i've seen the stuff with odd shaped holes like what you have. those pumpkinseeds look very great!

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21xdc    109

wow, that is just awesome! i need to scrounge up some of that stuff. i know my mom has some but i think hers is just the kind with square holes, but i know i've seen the stuff with odd shaped holes like what you have. those pumpkinseeds look very great!

BTW... Home Depot sells the grip liner too, I saw it there tonight.. http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100388875/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

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