Brent R

Lets Try This Again...what Name Brand Air Compreesor

46 posts in this topic

It seems that the ones that posted on this before were not happy with the air compressor that you are using.....I'm looking to buy a new one and need some feed back on a good compressor. 3 or 4 hundred dollars is my limit.....I hope to be painting a lot with it so a tank style is a must... It should be quiet as possible, but i can build a sound box to put it in if i have to....I looked on the pc and couldn't find anything that had good reviews...... Sure would welcome your comments....thanks

DTL

What is a good name brand...????

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It seems that the ones that posted on this before were not happy with the air compressor that you are using.....I'm looking to buy a new one and need some feed back on a good compressor. 3 or 4 hundred dollars is my limit.....I hope to be painting a lot with it so a tank style is a must... It should be quiet as possible, but i can build a sound box to put it in if i have to....I looked on the pc and couldn't find anything that had good reviews...... Sure would welcome your comments....thanks

DTL

What is a good name brand...????

Dewalt, Husky.. Go down to a hardware store and look around get a good warranty. I personally have a craftsmen and have not had any issues.

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I think you may want to familiarize yourself with compressor TYPES and then make a decision on BRANDS.

I hope to be painting a lot with it so a tank style is a must...

Not necessary unless you plan on running multiple guns at once. A tank will give you more volume of readily available air, thats it.

If you will be working alone with a few brushes, a diaphragm compressor will give you plenty of air AND its quiet, so no need for a muffler box.

I bought a Badger (Thayer Chandler /Spray-it) diaphragm compressor on ebay for $50 many years ago & it's quiet & works all day.

I also have a Craftsman 20 gallon rolling compressor that is super loud (oil-less) (120v) and works fine properly regulated.

I also have a 60 gallon Kobalt tank (oiled) with a GE (220v) motor pulled from a Binks compressor to replace the cheap import motors they put on these tanks.

It works fine and is a little quieter than the craftsman contractor compressor.

I use the diaphragm compressor for airbrushing, the craftsman for household projects and the Kobalt for general shop air supply but any of the 3 will do the job if properly regulated and protected (eg; water/oil traps, filters etc.).

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Buying a compressor with a large tank means a constant supply of air, and less cyclying, so less noise.

I have a old (1976) Craftsman compressor with a 30 gallon tank in my garage that I use for painting, nail guns, filling tires, and blowing away dirt, and it's held up fine.

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thanks for your reply about air compressors....I have been to every hardware store in Mobile.....and have looked at a 100 or more compressors....When i get home a check out the compressor on the enter net....Almost all of them get bad reviews......I was just trying to keep from wasting my money on a bad one....Thank you all for your input......take care

DTL

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i've got a small (1.5 gal) Husky compressor from home depot that i haven't had problems with

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Home Depot is a good place to shop. They have a good return policy, good prices, and good warranties.

If you're going to use it commercially, go to a reputable compressor dealer.

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And check on the length of the warranty. Some compressors only have a one year warranty while others have 2 or even 3 year warranties. While an extended warranty is no guarantee that your buying the best it does give you peace of mind that you won't be up a creek in a years time.

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I suggest you determine the features you need before buying a new compressor. I went through two, small oil free units, they both cycled constantly and were quite loud. Another problem with small units is lack of air supply if you need to do more than lite tasks.

We now have a Campbell Hausfeld 60 gal industrial unit, oil, two stage and 220 volt. Using die grinders to clean up casting marks on lead items demands a lot of air volume. Air supply is never a problem, enough to grow into our future plans with. It's mounted external to the main work area, so no noise to put up with.

Just because you may be small now doesn't mean you have to buy a size for your current needs. If you plan on growing your output, consider buying the capacity to meet or exceed your growth plans. Lowe's Home Improvement has a Kobalt similar to ours for under $500, at times on sale for $399.00

I wouldn't worry so much on the ratings. A good brand name with the features and price you can afford are much more important than ratings, with are only other peoples opinions.

PM me if have any other questions. Be glad to help.

Charlie

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If you are using the compressor professionally and cannot afford to have any failures or down time, then you really need a backup compressor. You may be lucky and never have a problem, but it is one of those items that can fail, usually at the worst possible moment. If you are not at that production stage as yet, I would buy a budget compressor now and when production picks up and you are going full time, spend the money on a decent large compressor for the job. This way, you have your backup and peace of mind.

Dave

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I started out with a central pneumatic 3 gallon air compressor and it only took 2 months to wear out. It turned on all the time and was really loud. Now I went out and got a 33 gallon craftsman and it will only turn on like once or twice a night and that makes a world of difference. I always have good air flow but you may want to get a regulator with it. I turn mine way down to do fine detail but can only get to about 15 psi with it turned way down. I would just get a big one if you don't want to deal with one that turns on all the time and about makes you jump every time it turns on.

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I bought a GMC compressor from walmart you can only buy on line type GMC compressor u tube to see a comparairison. It is EXTREMELY quiet and has a 4.6 gallon tank for around $225. I did a lot of looking around and am very happy with it

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I am confused. I would expect ANY aircompressor over the smallest table tops would supply more than enough air for an air brush. What is the big deal?

I've got a 12 volt in my truck that will fill 4 37 /11.7 tires from 12lbs to 50lbs in 20-30 minutes. It cost $59.95 + shipping. In my shop, I've got a 30 gallon roll around that will drive any tool in my shop including grinders and impacts for a short time, and something like a full size paint sprayer (with filter seperator) it can push nonstop. It cost 189.95 in 1993, and its replacement would only cost around $300 +/- today. For the $300-400 limit one poster put up you should be able to get a decent compressor form any number of sources. Campbell Hausfeld is not bad, Roll Aire is good. Sanborn is decent. The Huskies and Kobalts from the boxes look decent. Quincy is great but stupid expensive.

I prefer an oil sump compressor for long life, but even some of the airlesses you can get 8-10 years out of. I've gotten 18 so far out of my oil sump Campbell Hausfeld, and its still going.

(At one time in my life a million years ago I did warranty repair on air compressors as part of my job,)

Even the elcheapo china store and autoparts store compressors should push an airbrush just fine and most of those outfits have a pretty easy return policy if its too loud for you.

Edited by Bob La Londe

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How often do you use it and how often does it turn of and on....What is the max psi and how low(psi) can you turn it down to. Thanks for your help..Any advice would be welcome...

DTL

Brent

this message is for yardape.

Edited by Double Trouble Lures

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How often do you use it and how often does it turn of and on....What is the max psi and how low(psi) can you turn it down to. Thanks for your help..Any advice would be welcome...

DTL

Brent

this message is for yardape.

I would run an external regulator and seperator for an airbrush. I would not turn down the compressor.

I know that message was not for me, but turning down the trip switch on your compressor just makes it cycle more often. Have it switch off at max reccomended pressure instead, and use an external regulator.

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thanks for your reply.....the guy i sent the message to uses a 41/2 gallon tank and i was asking how often it turned on and off....I agree with what you said about using 2 regulators, you should be able to turn down the pressure down to 1 psi that way....Am i correct about that???? Someone else told me that they use 2 regulators with a desacant filter on the out going end of the second regulator. He also uses a pistol grip filter at the air brush....WOW that sounds like over kill to me...But i'm new at this so i'm not sure i have a right to judge...Anymore advice would be welcomed....Thanks for everything.

DTL

Brent

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thanks for your reply.....the guy i sent the message to uses a 41/2 gallon tank and i was asking how often it turned on and off....I agree with what you said about using 2 regulators, you should be able to turn down the pressure down to 1 psi that way....Am i correct about that???? Someone else told me that they use 2 regulators with a desacant filter on the out going end of the second regulator. He also uses a pistol grip filter at the air brush....WOW that sounds like over kill to me...But i'm new at this so i'm not sure i have a right to judge...Anymore advice would be welcomed....Thanks for everything.

DTL

Brent

Some cheap to mid price compressors just have a pressure shut off switch. Most mid price to better ones have that and a regulator on the output of the compressor. Most of the regulators I have seen on the compressors themselves are ok +/- a couple PSI. Most of the filter regulators I have seen are a little better for some reason. Maybe because they are usually closer to the actual work and you can adjust on the fly to eliminate problems.

As to driers. That will depend on your climate. In the dead of winter up north the air is so dry it doesn't matter, but come summer you are force distilling water in your compressor. Down here in the desert where I live we can get by with draining the water out of the tank every 6 months or so and a simple water seperator in the line.

Still for low pressure, and detail paint work I would go with the added assurance of a dessicant filter and remember to bake the dessiccant every so often.

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Some cheap to mid price compressors just have a pressure shut off switch. Most mid price to better ones have that and a regulator on the output of the compressor. Most of the regulators I have seen on the compressors themselves are ok +/- a couple PSI. Most of the filter regulators I have seen are a little better for some reason. Maybe because they are usually closer to the actual work and you can adjust on the fly to eliminate problems.

As to driers. That will depend on your climate. In the dead of winter up north the air is so dry it doesn't matter, but come summer you are force distilling water in your compressor. Down here in the desert where I live we can get by with draining the water out of the tank every 6 months or so and a simple water seperator in the line.

Still for low pressure, and detail paint work I would go with the added assurance of a dessicant filter and remember to bake the dessiccant every so often.

what do you mean.....bake the dessicant ...and how do you do this???? thanks again

DTL

Brent

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If i put this stuff in the oven and it happens to have oil from the compressor on it want it smoke when heated??? Just a thought.

You really should not have ANY appreciable amount of oil coming down your airlines from your compressor. In someplace like a tire shop they may have an oiler in the line that sends a tiny bit of oil deliberately to keep their impacts lubricated, but for your application YOU WILL NOT INSTALL AN OILER. LOL. In the case of a shop that uses one they would install it after their drier. Oil and water don't mix very well.

In my home shop I don't use an oiler either. I just put a drop of air tool oil in my equpiment where I am supposed to before using it. No one tool gets enough constant use to justify a dedicated oiler inline, and I sure don't want oil in some of my other tools or coming out my blow gun.

Also, if desicant is coated with oil it won't work very well.

Edited by Bob La Londe

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Removes water vapor, dirt, dust and oil vapor. Changes from blue to pink when the filter needs changing. This is what i thought a dissecant filter does...If you have a compressor that uses oil you might get oil vapor in the air line....I'm new at this so i am try to learn all i can...Thanks for all your help....Any more input would be welcomed....

DTL

Brent

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I use the GMC compressor every day and have for about 6 months, the regulator will let you get down to 1 psi or up to 90 psi. When I am base coating a dozen baits (when I am using the most air) it will maybe kick on 2-3 times but it is soooo quiet you really don't notice it. My prior craftsman compressor was so loud you really needed hearing protection but this gmc compressor allows me to carry on a conversation or still hear my radio while it runs, Im telling you this is absolutely one of my best purchases to date. You won't be disappointed it is a GREAT unit. ;)

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I use a tankless oiless airbrush compressor from Harbor Freight, that comes with an easy-to-use regulator and water trap. I use it in the house. It runs while I'm spraying and stops automatically when I stop. It is extremely durable and very quiet...it purrs, and it never disturbs my wife when she's sleeping, or working on the computer 5 feet away. It takes up very little space, and is easily moved with one hand. 0-40 psi working pressure, 56 max. My fishing & lurebuilding friend David Sullivan bought a similar one after seeing mine operate, which i've had over 3 years now. We both paint a lot, using Createx and .35 gravity-feed Iwata brushes, and our oiless, maintenance-free compressors don't give us a second of trouble ever. they don't pulse; having a moisture trap prevents pulsing. I paid about $75 for mine, model #93657.

Like Jerry said, what are you going to use it for? You could go buy one of these and be painting while you decide what kind of larger compressor you really need for real professional painting ;) . If mine were stolen, and I had unlimited funds to spend on a replacement, I would buy this same model tomorrow. It does everything I ask of it, which is to power my airbrush, perfectly. My big compressor out back in my shed, has only disadvantages when compared to my little diaphram airbrush compressor, no advantages whatsoever.

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