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Herron

How Do I Start (assuming I Should)?

7 posts in this topic

I'm new to this and very intrigued. Is there a link or recommended resource on basics? Something that describes the hardware (hooks, eyes, and (gulp) joints), basic tools, etc.? Not trying to be lazy, just a little overwhelmed. Thanks!

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A good place to start, is to read all the threads in the hard baits tutorial section. This will familiarize you with the various techniques and jargon: http://www.tackleund...ardbait-how-to/

Next, decide what type of lure you want to make. If you have not decided, browse the hard baits gallery for ideas: http://www.tackleund...y/8-hard-baits/

Do a search on the lure and read all you can. There are very few threads on how to make a particular lure from start to finish. Everyone does it different. For example, take the hook and tow eyes, you can buy screw eyes, twist your own eyes or through wire. For through wire, you can shape the lure then split, you can build two halves and glue together or you can cut slots. The same number of variations go for ballast weights and lips. Learn the different variations and choose one that might work for you.

Don’t spend money on special tools until you know that you like the hobby and are going to continue. Start off simple, a piece of light, easy to carve wood, knife, sand papers of different grades, small tennon saw (hacksaw will work, just not as controllable), a pack of 2 part 30 min epoxy to seal, hooks and split rings. Don’t even think about paint. First job is to make a lure that swims.

Then you read up on sealing wood, priming, different types of paints and top coats.

Dave

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A very good piece of advice from Vodkaman. But be careful. You have to make up your mind if you like it or not before spending much money. In case you decide to continue, I think you will need the money you would spend on about 200 lures, just to get you started in this hobby :rolleyes:

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Rofish is correct, this is not a cost saving exercise, unless you stick with the most basic of tools. This hobby is extremely addictive and after half a dozen lures, you will be thinking about bandsaws, table saws, belt sanders, drill presses, airbrushes, compressors and a host of other tools that make each operation a bit easier, but move any possibility of a break even point way into the future.

So why do it? It keeps you occupied and involved in the off season. It is creative, takes practice, but the skills are achievable. The achievement of building something original that catches fish is priceless. Catching your first fish on a homey is priceless. You will feel pride in showing your wares to other anglers when you are catching and they are not. There are plenty of reasons that make this hobby worth while and enjoyable.

It is not for everyone. If it is for you, then you will find yourself dreaming about lures, the next creation, new ideas etc. I would like to tell you that this only persists for a year or so, but I would be lying. Build a few and see how it goes, but be warned, once the addiction takes hold, there is no known cure.

Dave

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Dave's right, the answers to most of your questions are in the tutorials. Once you've read them, and have more, specific questions, you can use the search feature of the site to get answers for them, too.

Nothing will teach you faster than actually trying to make a lure, and the makers here will be happy to help you once you've tried.

I guess we all like a good car wreck!

Seriously, the people here have all the answers, mostly gleaned through hard work and trial and error, and they don't mind helping once you've jumped in. Everthing I know about lure making I learned from TU.

But do your homework first, with the tutorials and search, so you don't come across as someone who just wants to fall out of bed and make lures. Nothing turns these lure makers off faster that someone who isn't willing to put in his time.

If I may, I will offer you one piece of advice.

The easiest lure to start with is a walking topwater lure, like a Zara Spook or a Sammie.

No lip, easy to shape and weight, and you will learn how to do the basics in lure making on a lure with fewer variables.

Just be sure, once you've shaped your lure and drilled your holes for hardware and ballast, to seal the wood before you float test it. Otherwise, the wood will soak up water (any wooden lure's deadly enemy) and you won't get a true reading on how it floats and swims.

For beginning lure makers, broom handles and rattle can paints are your friend.

Good luck.

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Wow! thanks for all the feedback! I appreciate the warnings, too. I'll take this path slowly in case I need to find my way back to reality. Again, thanks!

H (aka "Budding Lure Builder Addict?")

Edited by Herron

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I'd do repaints to start. Tuning a handmade crank is a lot harder than painting one. You have to know how to paint anyway so start there. If you're fishing stained water you might start with Extreme Glitter (wal-mart, craft stores, $5), a few nice lure eyes off ebay to keep the shipping cost down, and some Devcon 2 Ton epoxy for a proven, tough, non yellowing clearcoat (see the Devcon site for dealers, you may have to email but they can tell you exactly where to find it - $3) Best way to apply D2T is with a grocery bag stretched over you finger. Stick the crank lip into a weighted cardboard box and flip it every 5 minutes for about 1/2 hr. Before you clear it you might add some scales to the back using one of those fluffy plastic shower scrub things (one dollar, just lay it down on the back and spray after you've dried your base coat or maybe the first thin coat of clear) and a good can of spray paint. You may want to search around to make sure the brand of paint will work with the Devcon.

You'd could do copies of flat - sided baits such as Rapala DT flats. Much easier than copying a fat crank and it will give you a bottom up understanding of ballasts, harnesses, etc.

Get yourself a Jann's Netcraft and a Barlow's catalog. They're full of almost everthing you need and you'll learn / get ideas from them. A lot easier on the brain than reading 10,000 scattered opinions.

From there you can dive deeper and deeper.

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