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Erick

Powder Painting Crankbaits

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Hey guys just getting going on the site here. I have got into melting/pouring my own light sonar/blade baits I pitch to shallows for spring time Red Wing, MN eye's. I now am curious if it is possible to heat a crank bait enough to powder paint them without warming the bill. Then to also be able to cure them with heat as well after to finish the paint. I have a sneaking hunch no unless I use an epoxy to finish the final coat?

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Hey guys just getting going on the site here. I have got into melting/pouring my own light sonar/blade baits I pitch to shallows for spring time Red Wing, MN eye's. I now am curious if it is possible to heat a crank bait enough to powder paint them without warming the bill. Then to also be able to cure them with heat as well after to finish the paint. I have a sneaking hunch no unless I use an epoxy to finish the final coat?

Instinct says no, but I think it might be possible.

The problems are air, moisture and charring. The air expands in the pre heat oven and has to be long enough so that the temperature settles and the air stops expanding. The moisture will be brought to the surface and driven off, but could raise the grain and give a surface finish problem, but the coating might cover this. Charring may or may not be a problem.

Air expansion is more of a problem in the curing process, as the lure cooled a tad while the powder was applied. Curing heat will cause this to expand again and might bubble the surface.

I think if you heat it in the oven to drive off the moisture and then give the body a final sanding, to flatten the grain, it will work.

Lips are like weed guards, best fitted after coating and curing.

I think you are going to have to get a scrap of wood and try it out and report back.

Dave

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If you're talking about hollow plastic baits, they will expand if the internal temp gets near boiling. I think the melt temp of powder paint is higher? If you use an epoxy to topcoat the bait, why use powder paint at all? Epoxy cures at room temp. If you're talking wood baits, you'll have to figure out the combustion temp of the wood, plus the melt temp of the lip material and compare that to the melt and cure temps of the powder paint. I've never heard of anyone doing it. Even if it's possible, I'm sure it would be very difficult to control all those temps exactly.

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