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bassercl

Another Compressor Moisture ?/clarification

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I'm new here and new to painting, so I did search to try to find my answer, but still need a little clarification. I'm currently using an old low pressure oil-less compressor (that I inherited) attached at to a 6 ft air hose. It seems I am getting moisture sprayed out with my paints so I wanted to add a filter/trap. Should I add an inline moisture trap between the hose and the brush or should I add a filter in between the compressor and hose? Or can I put both (or would that overheat the compressor)? Also, my comressor is sitting beside (level) to where I'm painting. Would it help to place the compressor on the floor under my brush? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

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I'm new here and new to painting, so I did search to try to find my answer, but still need a little clarification. I'm currently using an old low pressure oil-less compressor (that I inherited) attached at to a 6 ft air hose. It seems I am getting moisture sprayed out with my paints so I wanted to add a filter/trap. Should I add an inline moisture trap between the hose and the brush or should I add a filter in between the compressor and hose? Or can I put both (or would that overheat the compressor)? Also, my comressor is sitting beside (level) to where I'm painting. Would it help to place the compressor on the floor under my brush? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

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Welcome to TU. You can find an answer to most any question relating to fishing related items here. I would check out the air tank tank to see if there is some type of blow down valve that will let you blow out any moisture that has settled in the bottom of the tank. I would add the moisture separator between the hose and tank and that should help you with the water problem.

Rotorhead

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I plumb a fairly large Sears brand moisture trap right into the compressor output and it doesn't need to be drained very often. The airbrush hose connects to the trap with a quick-disconnect fitting. The small in-line traps usually contain a desiccant that you have to bake or replace. It's easier to use a larger trap and I haven't had any spitting from the airbrush. Your compressor shouldn't have any overheating issues from moisture traps, wherever they are in the assembly. I keep my compressor on the floor under my garage workbench. Don't think its position makes any difference.

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I can tell you that no matter how many air filters you have, even the small pistol grip ones that attach between your brush and the hose, you will still get water in your brush if you spray to long. Adding a moisture trap directly on your compressor will not help, it will just take a few more min for your brush to start spitting.

I have the pistol grip moisture trap on mine, only so I can get a visual indication when water is building up in the hose. When moisture starts to build up I just take my moisture trap off, hold my thumb over the hose to let pressure build up and just let go to blast moisture out. I do this about 20 times to make sure I get most the water out, then keep brushing. I have to do this every 30min or so, but thats airbrushing. Also I do live where it gets pretty humid, so it is more of a problem for me.

I have talked to a friend who has been airbrushing photo realistic art for over 30 years and this is the same method he uses as well.

Edited by starrSC

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I can tell you that no matter how many air filters you have, even the small pistol grip ones that attach between your brush and the hose, you will still get water in your brush if you spray to long. Adding a moisture trap directly on your compressor will not help, it will just take a few more min for your brush to start spitting.

I have the pistol grip moisture trap on mine, only so I can get a visual indication when water is building up in the hose. When moisture starts to build up I just take my moisture trap off, hold my thumb over the hose to let pressure build up and just let go to blast moisture out. I do this about 20 times to make sure I get most the water out, then keep brushing. I have to do this every 30min or so, but thats airbrushing. Also I do live where it gets pretty humid, so it is more of a problem for me.

I have talked to a friend who has been airbrushing photo realistic art for over 30 years and this is the same method he uses as well.

Wow, I live only one state away in the N.C. Piedmont but don't have the same problem with moisture in the line. I paint a max 6 baits at a time and it usually takes me several hours. I've been running my small 2 gallon 100 psi Sears tool compressor for about 6 months now, about once a week, and haven't needed to empty the water trap, nor clear the line of water yet. Your experience makes me wonder if I'm doing something wrong!

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I plumb a fairly large Sears brand moisture trap right into the compressor output and it doesn't need to be drained very often. The airbrush hose connects to the trap with a quick-disconnect fitting. The small in-line traps usually contain a desiccant that you have to bake or replace. It's easier to use a larger trap and I haven't had any spitting from the airbrush. Your compressor shouldn't have any overheating issues from moisture traps, wherever they are in the assembly. I keep my compressor on the floor under my garage workbench. Don't think its position makes any difference.

Thanks Bob- you have given me an idea, we used to use those crystals in the cooler/moisture trap in some old oxygen re-breather sets at work- I'm going to try and source some as it worked VERY well in those old sets, I am thinking if I can get enough it should be able to cope with an airbrush--Problem is I have retired so will have to get a mate to 'find' some for me.

Thanks again.

Pete

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Wow, I live only one state away in the N.C. Piedmont but don't have the same problem with moisture in the line. I paint a max 6 baits at a time and it usually takes me several hours. I've been running my small 2 gallon 100 psi Sears tool compressor for about 6 months now, about once a week, and haven't needed to empty the water trap, nor clear the line of water yet. Your experience makes me wonder if I'm doing something wrong!

Considering the charts for Piedmond, NC has lower humidity lvl's then my location, I would say you are one of the lucky ones. SC is one of the few places you can walk and swim at the same time.

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A Larger dessicant trap works well, I've been using one as I'm in an un-air-conditioned so. Florida garage. I use: a moisture trap just after the compressor, followed by the dessicant canister, then a 50 foot airhose, and finally a Iwata pistolgrip air filter fitted with a quick disconnect so that I can switch brushes as needed.

The big dessicant filters are expensive, but look patiently on the auction site and you can find them cheap. Actually I always thought you could use a old aquarium canister filter as long as it was okay for the pressure (don't need a bomb!) and fill it with dessicant.

Ideally, the filter should be as far away from the compressor as possible. The compression heats up the air, so it holds the moisture. as the air cools, the water droplets come out. Thats the idea for the 50' hose;it allows for the air to cool some some you can trap the moisture.

hope this helps someone,

clemmy

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Here in South Alabama the average humidity is 83% from Feb. thru Sept.....I am just getting started with airbrushing so i can't speak for myself...But i have a friend that lives about 1 mile away from me that has been airbrushing 34 years....He does everything from Tshirs, murals, baseball helmet, cars, trucks ect.....I talked to him this morning and he said he has a 13 gallon tank on his compressor....He said he drains the tank about every 4 to 5 months....and even then there is very little water that comes out of the tank.....I have a 6.3 gallon tank and i open the drain 1 time a week and i have never had more than a drop or two of water to come out.....I use a regulator with a water trap about 10 feet from my airbrush and i have never had any water show up in it....If i had to drain water from my hose for 20 min...every 30 min.....or so...i don't think i would enjoy airbrushing at all....Like i said i'm just getting started and i am hooked already......Now i know how that bass feels with i set the hook........Thanks to all the TU members that have help me out....Trust me you will be blessed.....take care

by the way this post is just my finding and my be different from other opinions...

Brent

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Here in South Alabama the average humidity is 83% from Feb. thru Sept.....I am just getting started with airbrushing so i can't speak for myself...But i have a friend that lives about 1 mile away from me that has been airbrushing 34 years....He does everything from Tshirs, murals, baseball helmet, cars, trucks ect.....I talked to him this morning and he said he has a 13 gallon tank on his compressor....He said he drains the tank about every 4 to 5 months....and even then there is very little water that comes out of the tank.....I have a 6.3 gallon tank and i open the drain 1 time a week and i have never had more than a drop or two of water to come out.....I use a regulator with a water trap about 10 feet from my airbrush and i have never had any water show up in it....If i had to drain water from my hose for 20 min...every 30 min.....or so...i don't think i would enjoy airbrushing at all....Like i said i'm just getting started and i am hooked already......Now i know how that bass feels with i set the hook........Thanks to all the TU members that have help me out....Trust me you will be blessed.....take care

by the way this post is just my finding and my be different from other opinions...

Brent

I opened the valve on mine, just to see. I can only guess at the actual amount of watery black sludge that came out, maybe 1 - 2 litres. It was not small. The compressor was bought new 2 years before and does not get much use, mostly for blowing dust from one end of the shop to the other. I am in Indonesia were the humidity is usually in the 90's. At the moment it is 96.

It is worth opening the tap, just to check, but do it outside (how do I know this? Don't ask).

Dave

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Just to make sure i new what i was talking about i called our local weather station.....They told me that the annual average humidity was 86% from early morning to late afternoon....and 65% for late afternoon to early morning.....Not that anyone cares...LOL......To keep on the safe side i think i will start draining my tanks at the end of the day.....I have a list of things to do at the end of the day on the door of my work space...just added a new one.....My memory is not what it use to be......LOL.....Take care

Brent

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