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RiverMan

Routers

10 posts in this topic

I have never used a router before but do understand that they can be:

1. Dangerous

2. A great tool

A wood-working friend of mine has suggested that I buy one for the purpose of cutting the weight slots on the bottom of the wood blanks and also for rounding off the edges of the lures. I would be interested in hearing from those of you much more experienced in this regard.

He suggested using a fence to cut the weight slots on the router and then a "roll over" bit for the edges. Anyone doing this? Trying to find a way to make things faster and more consistent.

Jed

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Jed,

What size lures are you building? You could rout a weight slot in a large blank prior to shaping the bodies but to try and round over the edges on a lure body would be asking for trouble. The router bit will grab the lure and toss it allowing your fingers to contact the bit.

I personall would not use a router on anything smaller than a sturgen decoy. Most of the wood we use to make lues is soft enough a good sharp rasp will rond over the edges faster than you can set up a router anyway.

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Jed

First off...BE CAREFUL! I use a router for all size hardbaits, but the secret is to waste some wood.

I saw out my baits and leave a 6 inch tail beyond where I plan to end the bait. I use that tail as a handle and run 90% of the lure through the router. I then take the lure to the bandsaw and cut off the tail and round it off on the sander real quick. I reuse the tails to make saw dust which I add to epoxy glue.

Be very respectful of a router working with any size part, but done correctly, it can be done safe. I also have stainless steel chain mail gloves, rubberized push blocks and I variety of special tools to keep me protected. Dont for get the eye protection as well.

With regard to weight holes, get a cheap drill press and a press vise. Get two balsa blocks (they are soft and wont damage your lure) and use them to clamp down on the lure body and simply drill perfect holes in every time.

Rivermon' you know how to get in touch with me if you want to discuss in more detail.

regards!

Take Care!

Chip :D

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Thanks you guys. Headed out tomorrow for a week of fun in California with my family. Chip will check with ya upon my return.

Jed

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Like Chip said routers need to be respected. The same goes for all of the tools we use. I use a router a lot in the production of my baits. They do an amazing job, but you need to know what you are doing.

Jed, Unless I am mistaken, your friend might have meant a "round over" bit vs. "roll over", but maybe it has more than one name. If you have more questions just ask.

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You definitely have to respect the router. I build electric guitars as a hobby and have nearly crapped my pants and cut my fingers off on several occasions when using a router. IMHO it's best to use a table mounted router and move your work. These things spin at about 25-35krpm so be careful. A router is not really an entry level wood-working tool so please be careful. As Chip mentioned use a push guide or extra material when you can.

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I'm sure you are correct on the bit "terminology" Lunge.......

Off for a week of fun in the sun!! Woohoooo!!! See ya in a week!

:lol:

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medical_main.jpg

http://www.bctf.ca/BCTEA/Reso/Powertool.htm

http://www.bctf.ca/BCTEA/Reso/router.doc

YES!!!! As with any power tool, carving knife, whatever, always practice caution.

Someone mentioned a table router. This is the only way I would go. Dont try to use a router alone. You can also take woodworking classes to learn to use these tools if your (anyone) nervous about them.

Never use a tool without some level of safety between you and the tool active area.

I would never (NEVER) run a lure through a router alone...... Only with a tail handle like I described above or with a jig or push block designed to handle your part.

All you have to do is loose the tip of one finger and you wont be making lures anymore with your current expertise.

I have a B of Science Degree in Safety Engineering. If anyone ever has any safety related questions, run them by me.... (i.e. noise, ergonomics, chemical hygiene, tool safety, Lock out/tag out... etc....) :D

Take Care!

Chip :D

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Guys,

I have fooled a little with a router to round over some baits. How would you handle a bait like the dbait type discussed a few weeks ago with regard to being a relatively thin bait that when you round one side you actually lose the clean edge where your ball bearing touches the bait. Does that make sense? :huh:

Thanks.

Volp1

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I have a large table router for most baits, but for thin baits I use this smaller router by dremel:

231a.jpg

and this bit:

http://www.mytoolstore.com/dremel/615c.gif

for making flat baits. These are realitively safe routers to use, but you have to watch the pressure because the dremel will flex and make an uneven round over. not difficult at all to master, just practice on some scrap a few times before going to your baits.

These are some baits I did with this router:

Littlebeedee.JPG

perchminislammer.JPG

smphishbones.JPG

Take Care!

Chip :D

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