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thundercat

Adding Color To Existing Bait

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I have a friend that wants some color added to the bottom of some brand new LC baits. I have added the color after scuffing the surface on the bottom of bait but now that they are ready for clear I am at a delima of clearing the entire bait with a light coat of D2T or just the bottom of the bait. I also have some DN S-81 but I guess I would need to dip the whole bait. These baits are LC and they seem to have a fairly thin coat of clear on them from the factory. I also have automotive clear but dont spray it that often. Want to give the best overall finish as possible. Any advice on the best way to do these going foward? Thanks TU.

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Clear the whole bait for a uniform finish. I personally would never clear just a portion but thats me. Also I would use the DN S81 for this as it is a thin and strong coating. You could also use the auto clear but stay away from the D2T unless you thin it with DA.

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I have a friend that wants some color added to the bottom of some brand new LC baits. I have added the color after scuffing the surface on the bottom of bait but now that they are ready for clear I am at a delima of clearing the entire bait with a light coat of D2T or just the bottom of the bait. I also have some DN S-81 but I guess I would need to dip the whole bait. These baits are LC and they seem to have a fairly thin coat of clear on them from the factory. I also have automotive clear but dont spray it that often. Want to give the best overall finish as possible. Any advice on the best way to do these going foward? Thanks TU.

Clearing one section might throw it off balance just a hair. I would also clean,scuff,clean the factory clear first all around (unless it's a vacuum metalized finish or something) if I were doing the lure- no telling what adhesion between dn and original clear will be if you don't.

And light coats of D2T tend to not self - level very well I've noticed. But as the other poster said maybe thin it. DN can be thinned with acetone and sprayed.

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If I were going to add color over an existing bait, and then clear it, I would first test to see if acetone would affect the exist finish.

If it does, I'd stay away from a solvent based clear coat. One of the great things I've read about DN1 is that it penetrates the paint scheme and bonds really well with it, so I'm guessing it might react with the factory topcoat if acetone does affect it.

It's an easy test to do, with a small paint brush dipped in the acetone, and then applied to a small part of the crank.

I've found most factory lure topcoats are, indeed, affected by acetone, so I would surely test before I proceeded.

My repaint routine with factory baits, like Norman DD22's, if it is affected by acetone, is to dip in acetone to clean and "reactivate" the factory finish and then paint and clear with a water based urethane.

A quick dip isn't going to make the factory finish peel. It's just going to make the surface clean and ready for paint.

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I wouldn't do a patch clearcoat with epoxy because the margins will definitely show and detract from the overall look. I've overpainted a variety of factory lures and then dipped them in Dick Nite S81 with no problem, so that's what I'd do (one dip only!). If you also have automotive clear, I don't see a problem with that either. Both have excellent adhesion and durability.

Mark - does a finish exist that will not be affected by acetone? That stuff dissolves just about anything.

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Bob,

You're probably right, although automotive catalyzed finishes seem to be virtually bullet proof.

I was thinking more of the problems that might arise if you put DN1 over a finish that's affected by acetone. I've never done it, so I can't speak from personal experience. But I have had lacquer clear coats wrinkle the finish beneath them, so I thought it was worth discussing.

I'm actually happy that acetone does affect so many lure finishes, because it makes repainting much easier. A quick dip in acetone to restore a "virgin" surface is a whole lot quicker and easier that scuffing.

Edited by mark poulson

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