Central

Preventing Airbrush Beading Flaw

7 posts in this topic

I've attached my first attempt at airbrushing to exhibit the problem that is occurring.

The marks around the gill plate eyes and fins are not splatter marks but are primarily caused from the paint bleading (spiderwebbing?). I test my airpreasure on paper to make sure I'm not splattering and it is low enough to create a thin line but high enough to work good but as soon as it hits the bait it wants to bead.

I'm mixing in 50% createx with the remaining 50% being aprox 2 parts future and 1 part water. I do not know what my preasure is because my current air compressor measures in 10's. Under 10, probabaly around 5 seems to be optimal for the small lines with the Iwata HP-CS and reduces some of the spiderwebbing from excesive pressure.

I believe this is because I'm using too much pledge future? BTW anyone want to share a link to a good pressure gauge one that shows low PSI as I can't find one locally and figure it would be helpful for this.

I've searched the site and found other using other things to thin but typically mention using a much higher PSI with them. Things like iso. alcohol and glycerine, know idea where I'd obtain glycerine.

Thanks,

Steve

SplatterBass.jpg

SplatterBass.jpg

SplatterBass.jpg

SplatterBass.jpg

SplatterBass.jpg

SplatterBass.jpg

SplatterBass.jpg

SplatterBass.jpg

post-25825-0-95695600-1304473654_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't experimented much since I started using Future Pledge, but the formula I first read about and am using is: 50% Createx paint, 30% water, 20% Future. There's no law that says you have to thin your paint 50%, so you might try less thinning if you are getting beading when it hits the lure. A mix of water, alcohol and a little glycerine is another thinning formula. I haven't tried that but you get glycerine at a drug store.

I bought my pressure gauge at a local Home Depot store. Home centers that sell air tools usually also sell hose fittings, hose adapters, gauges, water traps, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm no expert, but I think the reason your having the problem on a lure and not on the paper your testing your brush on is that paper is porous and will absorb a certain amount of paint. A sealed wood bait or a plastic bait is not going to absorb paint. Try setting your airbrush pressure using a piece of pvc pipe or some other type of plastic. And it's not 100% necessary that your pressure gauge shows a reading. Sometimes my gauge shows no pressure at all, but I still have enough air going through the brush to spray paint. Now that is if I've thinned the paint really well. It's nice to have a totally accurate pressure reading, but not absolutely necessary. That's just my :twocents:

Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think your problem may be cause by you using to much paint on each pass. If I am trying to do detail like that I used to get bleeding like that and I just started to thin down my paint like you are and just use very little paint on each pass. You could do a couple very light passes over the area and then let it sit for like 5 to 10 seconds and do another couple of passes and I would think that would take care of your problem. I also use a tcp global pressure gauge that you can mount to a wall and that one allows you to go all the way down to 1 psi if you want and has worked wonders for me getting fine detail on baits. Also if I am going to use a stencil I cut it out of plastic that I get for making stencils at hobby lobby and if you are worried about the paint coming up I will do the fine details after I have clear coated the bait once. Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've attached my first attempt at airbrushing to exhibit the problem that is occurring.

The marks around the gill plate eyes and fins are not splatter marks but are primarily caused from the paint bleading (spiderwebbing?). I test my airpreasure on paper to make sure I'm not splattering and it is low enough to create a thin line but high enough to work good but as soon as it hits the bait it wants to bead.

I'm mixing in 50% createx with the remaining 50% being aprox 2 parts future and 1 part water. I do not know what my preasure is because my current air compressor measures in 10's. Under 10, probabaly around 5 seems to be optimal for the small lines with the Iwata HP-CS and reduces some of the spiderwebbing from excesive pressure.

I believe this is because I'm using too much pledge future? BTW anyone want to share a link to a good pressure gauge one that shows low PSI as I can't find one locally and figure it would be helpful for this.

I've searched the site and found other using other things to thin but typically mention using a much higher PSI with them. Things like iso. alcohol and glycerine, know idea where I'd obtain glycerine.

Thanks,

Steve

SplatterBass.jpg

when i first started with the airbrush i was having alot of trouble with consistant air flow so i picked up a regulator from northerntool and a couple of ends just so i could make it and inline regulator i just turned the one on the tank all the way up since it was so inacurate. here is the one i picked up and its been working like a charm.

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200327087_200327087

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a specific set of nozzles to do that. What I did we'd to drop.the tips on the floor to get a more real look because nothing is in a perfect straight line, but I still have other paints jobs that hold " hard edges". I think it gives the fish another look from all the other lures. You haven't dropped.yours have you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will go the other direction and say your thinning the paint too much. IMO if you can blow paint at less than 10psi it is too thin. Regulators are good for getting you in the ballpark but painting fine lines is a feel that comes with time. If I remember right the standard CS is a .35 needle. Ya might have to drop down to a .25 for super thin lines/paint. If it were me I would hold up a comb and paint your 3 lines and then go back over it again free hand with a slightly darker color. The blow out would give it a cool 3D effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now