Kris

Brushing On D2t

19 posts in this topic

I'v been using D2T for about 2 years now. Here lately I've started having some problems with it as it clears.

I use synthetic artist brushes to brush the D2T on the bait. I clean the brush in between clearing baits with Acetone. I reuse the brushes and keep them soft by cleaning them with Dawn liquid detergent after I'm through

clearing my baits.

For those who use D2T I ask the following ....

1. What type of brush do you use? (reuse or throw away)

2. Do you clean brush between clearing baits? If so, with what.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was using those acid brushes from harbor freights. They seemed to work ok until I found some "epoxy brushes" at a local hobby shop. They have 3 times the amount of bristles and they don't fall out like the HB acid brushes do. They cost .20 each and i throw them away. I also don't get any bubbles like I did with the HB brushes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cheap brushes from a local shop. I don't know what kind they are, wooden handle, straw coloed bristles, fairly stiff. I don't have problems with the bristles comming out, but give new brushes a good wet scrub on a brick or rough surface.

I clean my brushes by first squeezing out excess on an old rag. I dip in regular thinners and brush hard on a rough cut piece of timber, repeat about ten times. Renew the thinners and repeat again. Cleaning takes no more than two minutes. I cannot find decent quantities of acetone, but the thinners does the job just fine.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the throw aways, have metal handle's with black bristles. Very hardy, clean between each batch and they last forever. I still get bubbles though....don't know if its the brushes fault??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the throw aways, have metal handle's with black bristles. Very hardy, clean between each batch and they last forever. I still get bubbles though....don't know if its the brushes fault??

You mean...USER ERROR? :o

The last batch of brushes I got from HB are very "wispy". I think I am introducing the bubbles as I apply. I say that because there are no bubbles in the mixing cup. They do dissipate almost immediately and are not an issue. The "epoxy" brushes are the thicker black bristled ones you described. I will take a pic of both later and post them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the HF acid brushes, but always modify them before using. I crimp them really good to keep the bristles from falling out then cut the bristles down so they are a little more stout. This has worked really well for me with D2T. I also never reuse them, just toss them when done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the HF acid brushes, but always modify them before using. I crimp them really good to keep the bristles from falling out then cut the bristles down so they are a little more stout. This has worked really well for me with D2T. I also never reuse them, just toss them when done.

+1.... I do exactly this procedure too.

@ Fishnart - To rid of the bubles try mixing the D2T with a paperclip and then hit the D2T with a heat gun really quickly once applied to your bait. The heat gun will pop the bubbles and thin the D2T a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use cheap artist brushes and re-use them indefinitely, cleaning them in lacquer thinner or acetone. Once epoxy cures, soap is certainly not going to remove it. I don't know what effect, if any, soap residue would have on a coat of epoxy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BobP, I've wondered the same thing myself about soap's effect on epoxy if any. I clean my brushes with the soap after my last cleaning with the Acetone. Then I run them under water to make sure all soap is washed out.

I've always had bubble problems when mixing D2T. I've started mixing my D2T on aluminum foil and mixing slowly. I've noticed that I have a lot less bubbles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was having trouble with bubbles. Saw a post somewhere in the TU vault of info saying someone microwaved his epoxy befor brushing it on. I have tried this a couple times, seems to work great. I do this for my sealing coat. Mix the D2T in a small solo cup, add 3-4 drops of denatured alcohol, mix well. Microwave for 10 seconds. Comes out warm and bubble-less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was having trouble with bubbles. Saw a post somewhere in the TU vault of info saying someone microwaved his epoxy befor brushing it on. I have tried this a couple times, seems to work great. I do this for my sealing coat. Mix the D2T in a small solo cup, add 3-4 drops of denatured alcohol, mix well. Microwave for 10 seconds. Comes out warm and bubble-less.

Yes, but you also shorten the brush time when you heat it - both from the heat and the seconds you delay in getting it on the lure. Epoxy's curing process is exothermic. You can't tell that from a few ML's of D2T sitting in a jar lid but if you mix up a big batch, you would feel the heat it generates. More heat = faster cure. For me, just mixing in a few drops of denatured alcohol is enough to get the bubbles out. Plus, using a fine bristle artist brush pops 99% of the bubbles as you smooth it on the lure. Everyone develops his own prep and application process for epoxy and there isn't a wrong way as long as the final results are satisfactory and reliable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the cheap walmart brushes and throw them away when done on D2T . The only problem with them is when i thin the D2T with denatured alchohol it will make the color of plastic on the brush tint the epoxy but that is not always a bad thing it looks cool on some baits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the HF acid brushes, but always modify them before using. I crimp them really good to keep the bristles from falling out then cut the bristles down so they are a little more stout. This has worked really well for me with D2T. I also never reuse them, just toss them when done.

I do like Cheap Trix. Harbor Freight brushes, trimmed to about a half inch, crimp the brush so that it holds the bristles better, and I toss 'em when I'm finished.

As far as mixing: I've mixed on paper, cardboard, foil, plastic, the bottom of Coke cans, wood, or whatever is handy at the time. I've mixed my D2T with nails, popscicle sticks, tooth picks, small knife blades, plastic sticks, or wood sticks. I have NEVER, I repeat NEVER had a problem with air bubbles in my finish. I mix it fast, mix it slow, it doesn't matter. Maybe you guys are just trying too hard. :?

Edited by Lincoya

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to have the same problems everyone else is talking about. Since I've started using a 3/4" brush and really loading the brush with D2T it works soooooooo much better. When I was having all the trouble is when I was trying to "paint" a thin coat on. Now I mix the hell out of it and don't worry about bubbles. After mixing I exhale into the plastic mixing cups I'm using to pop any large bubbles and don't worry about the tiny ones. The brush will pop those when being applied. I really load the brush with D2T and start at the head of the bait and start working my way to the rear paying special attention to areas around the lip and hook hangers. One way you get bubbles is to repeatedly go over an area trying to smooth it out with a "dry" brush. Like Lincoya said, when I quit "trying too hard" things started to work a lot better.

Edited by RayburnGuy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A strong light, to examine the bait under, I think is important. Sometimes you can see a problem developing, like a bare streak or patch that you definately covered. If you catch this early enough, you can work the epoxy to wet the surface.

I cannot recall having bubble problems, just the odd one or two that brush out.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A strong light, to examine the bait under, I think is important. Sometimes you can see a problem developing, like a bare streak or patch that you definately covered. If you catch this early enough, you can work the epoxy to wet the surface.

I cannot recall having bubble problems, just the odd one or two that brush out.

Dave

The only time i have a real bubble issue is when i have recesses....Exp...eyes, carved gil markings and what not. The bubbles seem to get trapped in there... While stiring to get less bubbles you can use a paperclip but really all you need is a quick hit with a heat gun on low... it pops the bubbles, thins and sets the epoxy faster. It really helps with cure if you use Etex.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now