blazt*

Now I Own The Future

51 posts in this topic

Sounds like an acetone backflush and needle cleaning is going to be my last step whenever I use Future.

I've gotten spoiled, since a water/detergent backflush cleans my brushes so well now, but the addition of Future seems like such a plus, I'm willing to add another cleaning step.

It's probably a good step to add, anyway.

Thanks for the headsup, Bob.

I've been trying to figure out a way to hold the trigger down and back for automatic flushing with a full jar of alchy or acetone. A rubber band worked, but it was kind of awkward and the trigger tended to pop off the valve. Maybe two rubber bands. Or maybe epoxy a small plastic cap - like thing to a hair elastic, then put that on the trigger. Watching the solvent in that big jar go down during a flush is like watching grass grow. Now that I'm using Future I want to make it easy so I do it all the time!

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I haven't used Future in awhile because when I initially tried it my paint got bubbly in the gravity feed. Huge bubbles. Overflowing huge bubbles. Did I pick up the wrong kind of Future? Seemed like what I got was pretty much soap.

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Big Bass Man, When I first started using Future as a thinner I added water along with the Future and for me it seemed to water down the paint to much for me. I've been adding straight Future to my paints with no problems so far.

I usually will fill a empty AB paint bottle with 50% paint then add about 10-15% Future. Mix and check paint. If it needs a little more Future I'll add a little more.

Thanks Kris!! Thats what I was wandering, if adding water with it would thin the paint to much.

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I've been trying to figure out a way to hold the trigger down and back for automatic flushing with a full jar of alchy or acetone. A rubber band worked, but it was kind of awkward and the trigger tended to pop off the valve. Maybe two rubber bands. Or maybe epoxy a small plastic cap - like thing to a hair elastic, then put that on the trigger. Watching the solvent in that big jar go down during a flush is like watching grass grow. Now that I'm using Future I want to make it easy so I do it all the time!

Blazt,

I have a feeling you may be missing a step in your cleaning process that makes it much faster, and cuts down on the amount of acetone, or any cleaning solution, that's needed.

I haven't yet tried the Future, but this is how I clean my brushes.

Between colors, I backflush and clean with a water and dishwashing liquid mixture, but, when I'm done with my painting session, here's my final cleaning routine.

I wear a nitrile glove on my left hand when I paint, and when I clean my brush, since I hole my crankbaits in my hand a lot of the time to paint them, and I'm right handed.

I back flush with acetone by covering the nozzle tip with my left index finger, and then shooting the acetone through at full air pressure, full paint. That forces the solvent back up through the cup, or back into the bottle on my siphon brush, and does a great job cleaning out the tiny air holes in the nozzle.

It doesn't take a lot of acetone to clean out all the paint.

I use a small fine bristle brush, dipped in the acetone, to clean out the nozzle tip, where dried paint accumulates as I paint.

I then remove the needle, wipe off any paint and solvent, and then push it back and forth in the hole to get any remaining paint out, and shoot some more acetone through the brush to get any last paint out.

Then I put my water/detergent mix into the bowl, backflush and shoot some of it through the brush to remove the remaining acetone and to lube the needle, and it's set for the next time I want to paint.

I'll probably use acetone after each Future-thinned paint, because BobP said he noticed the Future sets up strong in the needle hole, and I don't want to have to use pliers to get it moving again. Silly me. :lol:

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Blazt,

I have a feeling you may be missing a step in your cleaning process that makes it much faster, and cuts down on the amount of acetone, or any cleaning solution, that's needed.

I haven't yet tried the Future, but this is how I clean my brushes.

Between colors, I backflush and clean with a water and dishwashing liquid mixture, but, when I'm done with my painting session, here's my final cleaning routine.

I wear a nitrile glove on my left hand when I paint, and when I clean my brush, since I hole my crankbaits in my hand a lot of the time to paint them, and I'm right handed.

I back flush with acetone by covering the nozzle tip with my left index finger, and then shooting the acetone through at full air pressure, full paint. That forces the solvent back up through the cup, or back into the bottle on my siphon brush, and does a great job cleaning out the tiny air holes in the nozzle.

It doesn't take a lot of acetone to clean out all the paint.

I use a small fine bristle brush, dipped in the acetone, to clean out the nozzle tip, where dried paint accumulates as I paint.

I then remove the needle, wipe off any paint and solvent, and then push it back and forth in the hole to get any remaining paint out, and shoot some more acetone through the brush to get any last paint out.

Then I put my water/detergent mix into the bowl, backflush and shoot some of it through the brush to remove the remaining acetone and to lube the needle, and it's set for the next time I want to paint.

I'll probably use acetone after each Future-thinned paint, because BobP said he noticed the Future sets up strong in the needle hole, and I don't want to have to use pliers to get it moving again. Silly me. :lol:

Yes I do backflush w/ 50% alc. It's the last step, and once I backflush I dump what's left out to avoid running that crap back through. I've been doing multihour sessions lately with futurized pearls, and flushing with a full jar of the 50% at the end of the day. Every single time (I've been testing the for about 5 days now) the needle has been 100% smooth the day after. I probably wouldn't worry about it.

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I've found that acetone is a much more aggressive solvent for cleaning than alcohol.

If I backflush with acetone, and then loosen the nozzle slightly and back flush again, it's amazing how much dried paint is pushed back into the bowl.

I don't know exactly how airbrushes work, but I do know that having the tiny holes in the nozzle clogged makes painting almost impossible.

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Be aware that some airbrushes have small o-rings that may degrade over time. I didn't find out what the o-ring material is but I did see on a airbrush supplier web page offer solvent resistant o-rings. I took an airbrush class and the instructor said he changed his Iwahta airbrushed from rubber o-nng to teflon. He does all kinds of airbrush work- art work to automobile and use solvent based paints. My take away is that if a brush starts acting up maybe replace the packing o-ring.

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I'm with Mark about the acetone. I even run a little through my gravity feed brush when cleaning between color changes. It's also what I do my final cleanup with. About once a month or so I will let the brush soak in Createx airbrush restorer for an hour or two. This procedure solved all my clogging issues.

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I've found that acetone is a much more aggressive solvent for cleaning than alcohol.

If I backflush with acetone, and then loosen the nozzle slightly and back flush again, it's amazing how much dried paint is pushed back into the bowl.

I don't know exactly how airbrushes work, but I do know that having the tiny holes in the nozzle clogged makes painting almost impossible.

Do you mean that you loosen the nozzle and backflush right off, or do you tighten it back up before the flush?

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Be aware that some airbrushes have small o-rings that may degrade over time. I didn't find out what the o-ring material is but I did see on a airbrush supplier web page offer solvent resistant o-rings. I took an airbrush class and the instructor said he changed his Iwahta airbrushed from rubber o-nng to teflon. He does all kinds of airbrush work- art work to automobile and use solvent based paints. My take away is that if a brush starts acting up maybe replace the packing o-ring.

So far so good on mine. They seem to still be soft and pliable but I should probably start looking for a chem resistant set of replacements, including a length of tubing that I can slice into packing. Alcohol is really hard on rubber, or maybe my HG deluxe has chem resistant seals.

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Do you mean that you loosen the nozzle and backflush right off, or do you tighten it back up before the flush?

This is what I do after every paint session, or if my brush starts to act up.

I back flush with acetone with the nozzle tight, then loosen it and back flush again. After this backflush I check the cup. Typically there are little chunks of dried paint flushed back into the cup. I remove those with my finger.

Then I tighten the nozzle and backflush again with acetone.

Last, I pour some of my water/dw detergent mix into the cup, and move the needle back and forth to get the acetone out of the needle barrel.

Then I backflush with the water/detergent mix, and I'm done.

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I haven't used Future in awhile because when I initially tried it my paint got bubbly in the gravity feed. Huge bubbles. Overflowing huge bubbles. Did I pick up the wrong kind of Future? Seemed like what I got was pretty much soap.

Sam, bubbles in the cup always indicate a clog in the tip, in my experience. The correct product is labeled: Pledge Floor Care, Tile & Vinyl Floor Finish with Future shine. It used to be labeled simply Future. It's not a cleaner containing soap but an acrylic finish.

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As I understand it (and I'm no expert), solvent resistant packing has become pretty standard in airbrushes. When they say "resistant" that doesn't mean "proof" of course, but I don't hesitate to shoot lacquer thinner or acetone to clean my brush and so far, no problems in several years. Water, soapy or otherwise, is just not going to remove all the dried deposits in an airbrush. Soaking for hours in an airbrush cleaning solution does the trick but is not something I want to do after every session (I do it several times a year).

The instructions for Future say to remove it with ammonia and Armstrong cleaner in water. But running a cleaner containing ammonia through your airbrush will gradually strip the chrome plating out of the airbrush and is a no-no according to Iwata factory reps.

I haven't found the perfect way to remove traces of Future from my Iwata's barrel and packing. Sometime I have a stuck needle problem, sometimes not. Wiping the needle with a little machine oil before storage seems to help.

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Thanks, BobP. Strangest thing is that I used a new from the box cheap-o Harbor Freight brush to try it out. Didn't want to test it on my Iwata. Lots of bubbles. Figured it was the brush. Loaded it up in the Iwata and same issue. I'm going to check my bottle and make sure I got the right stuff. I could swear there's some kind of soap in mine. My brush works fine for most everything else, although it doesn't care to spray pearls very much, even when liberally thinned with water. Think the two are related? I just did a thorough cleaning with acetone (usually use DA) and we'll see if that makes any difference.

-Sam

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http://www.ehow.com/list_7160877_pledge-products-floor-care.html

According to this web page there are two versions of Pledge Vinyl and Tile Floor products. The Pledge with Future Shine has the acrylic added. The Pledge with Future Shine is the one that airbrush users add to their paints.

Hope this helps. I found some at wally world in the cleaning supply section.

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My bottle looks a little different, but its about a year old, so that might be the difference.

I think you've got the right stuff dhockey. The stuff Sam posted is for wood floors. I was told to get the Pledge for linoleum floors so they must make two different kinds.

Ben

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I think you've got the right stuff dhockey. The stuff Sam posted is for wood floors. I was told to get the Pledge for linoleum floors so they must make two different kinds.

Ben

Yes the wood floor kind has an amber tint to it....not what you want. I think I remember seeing some sort of pledge floor cleaner...maybe the other poster did get soap.

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I think you've got the right stuff dhockey. The stuff Sam posted is for wood floors. I was told to get the Pledge for linoleum floors so they must make two different kinds.

Ben

It's def the right stuff. Works like a champ =)

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I'm going to find the right stuff and give it another go. I'm mostly happy with my painting at this point, but always looking to evolve.

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I could not find the Pledge that is shown in the video. I bought the one for wood floors with future and have been using it for about 3 months. It works great. I have made comparisions between the Auto Air reducer and the other homemade reducer with windex/distilled water and glycerin. Of the three I have been using, I find the Pledge with Future to work the best.......hands down!. For createx white I have been using 50/30/20 like in the video. I don't use anywhere near that much for the other colors and some colors I don't thin at all.

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12.jpgtn.jpg

The recipe I've seen is 50% paint........30% pledge.............20% water...........

is this recipe only on metallics or ny of the paints? I use apple barrel i want a airbrush i also spraypaint2.jpg

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12.jpgtn.jpg

is this recipe only on metallics or ny of the paints? I use apple barrel i want a airbrush i also spraypaint2.jpg

also can someone tell me break it down a bit easier for a dummy like me? say 1 lure needing paint is 8 drops of paint how many drops of water and how many drops of the pledge sorry to be a bother........

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