MuskyGary

Thicker Lexan Lips

14 posts in this topic

Looking at the new baits at the icast show on Tacklewarehouse and seeing that the deep diver lips are thick at the plug end and thin at the outer point. Came up with the idea of glueing two lexan lips together on top of one another (pancake style) letting the lower piece protrude about one half inch to get the thin part. Just a idea wondering if anyone has tried that or if it will work? What type of glue would work best for glueing the two pieces together Superglue? Then after it dries you would have to drill a hole through it for the line tie wire. What do you think?

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I just glued a couple of pieces of poly as a test. The CA glue clouds up the polycarbonate, so is not a good solution. The glued piece did not flip off when flexed, as I expected it to do, it held strong. Resistance to flex was improved, as you would expect, this probably being your main reason for this exercise.

CApoly.jpg

Check out some aquarium sites. They weld acrylic sheets together with a glue that dissolves the plastic. I think this stuff works on polycarbonate as well, but you will need to check. What ever method you use to fix the two parts, a neat finish is likely to be your main problem.

Dave

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I used to work for a display company and did alot of acrylic fabrication. We used the WELD-ON 3 and 4 for virtually all our welds. Polycarbonate does cloud up slightly due to the high moisture content, the more humid it is the worse it clouds. You will still end up with a virtually clear joint though, but compared to acrylic it will be hazy. The nice thing about using the water thin solvent cements is that you can hold the pieces together, then (using a needle applicator) apply the glue where the two surfaces meet. The cement is drawn between the pieces through capillary action. The stuff dries quick so you can handle it within minutes. If I remember correctly, I think that solvents other than methylene chloride(WELD-ON 3) will work also, like MEK or acetone. I know acrylic can but not sure about polycarbonate.

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Why not just use g-10 and forget about the clear joint problem?

Kaleb

Because it has to be thin where it enters the water to get deeper depth.

Edited by MuskyGary

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I use Lexan for my crankbait bills.

If I use 1/16", I just wet sand the edges with 400 grit to take off the sharp corners.

If I use 1/8", I sand down the leading edge to get a thinner, sharper edge for better diving, and then wet sand that.

Wet sanding doesn't make it clear again, but it takes the curse off the sanding marks, and makes it more clear.

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yes if the scratch marks are not too deep, for a reference 600 grit used wet/dry sandpaper marks. Any coarser you are pushing it.

Look for plastic polishing compound too, you can buff with it till it shines.

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Recently read somewhere that rubbing compound like that used on car finishes works well. I have not tried it though.

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Recently read somewhere that rubbing compound like that used on car finishes works well. I have not tried it though.

I used that method once, when I could not find my abrasive soap bar. I dipped the buffing wheel in the liquid and did the buffing in a plastic bag, correctly anticipating the spray. It worked well. Just using a cloth with the liquid would work, just taking a bit longer.

Dave

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has anyone tried using a lexan or poly core and then putting that in a mold and casting epoxy or polyester over it to make a smoother more complex shape.

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If you put the poly part under a can with a bottle cap that has some superglue in it will clear smokey surfaces if they arent too far gone. It is a chemical thing that happens from the fumes. The machine shop guys where I work taught me that one. They were turning a poly tube for me and it got smoked looking. They did that trick and it cleared right up.

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