mholden

Large Tank Compressor Or Small, "quiet" Compressor?

14 posts in this topic

mholden    0

Hi everyone,

I found this site about a year ago and am really excited to start making my own lures. I have been lurking this whole time, doing a lot of reading and trying to absorb as much of the information as I can. I have bought myself an airbrush (Iwata) already and now that I am out of my apartment and into a house, I am finally ready to make the jump and buy an air compressor as well.

After reading a lot of threads on this topic already, I get the impression that many lure makers are split in term of their preference for compressors - between larger tool compressors (ideally with a larger tank (20gal+) capacity, which therefore cycle less often), or smaller "noiseless" airbrush compressors. So, I was hoping that some of you might take the time to help me decide on which would be right for me.

So, here is my situation: I just moved into a house, and my wife and I are expecting our first child in about a month. The baby's room does not share a wall ith the garage, but is still fairly close to it. Obviously, I don't want to be constantly waking up the baby if/when the compressor starts to cycle. So, I am stuck between filling a large tank when the baby is awake and running it for a good while (silently) while he/she sleeps, or getting a very, very quiet compressor and running it whenever. The major question for me is, which will be better at not annoying my wife (and kid)?

Also, for those of you who use larger capacity compressors, how long can you actually airbrush between cycles?

Here are the two of the options that I have been considering (Home Depot has the 26 gallon one on sale here in Canada):

---- Larger tank: http://www.homedepot...lue-pack/958304

---- Small, HF option: http://www.harborfre...-kit-95630.html

***** note, I am not going to be using the AB that comes with the HF kit - I just chose this one as an illustration of the type of compressor

I know that there are a lot of questions here, so I want to thank you in advance for any advice that you can offer on this (and for all the info that I have already learned on this site along the way).

Thanks a million!

Mark

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mark poulson    1,700

If the baby's room doesn't share a wall with the garage, a big compressor should be fine.

I would buy that one, and, if it turns out to be a problem, you can always turn it off unti the baby is awake.

My kid's rooms share a garage wall, and the 30 gallon compressor I use is right in front of that wall, but it has never been a problem, and I raised the last three kids in this house, with the compressor on the whole time.

Big tanks mean less cycling, so it's not going to be such a huge problem. And as long as you get a decent compressor, it won't be that loud, anyway.

Tankless airbrush comppressors are a compromise at best, and really limit your painting ability due to rapid loss of air pressure, so only use one if you really have to. I personally think they are really for nail salons, not painters.

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I would for sure go with a big compressor. I have a 33 gallon and I turn it on once and turn it off. I spray at night so I turn it on when it gets close to bath time for my little man and I can spray all night on one tank. I would also suggest getting an inline regulator/moisture trap. Most air compressor come with them but they are not very sensative. I went the route of having a small air compressor and mine turned on all the time and the noiseless ones I heard pulsate when running.

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BobP    832

I have both types but prefer the tool compressor. The tankless airbrush compressors turn on when you demand air from them by hitting the airbrush trigger. Mine had 60 psi max and worked OK but the demand switch sometimes acts up and I also had to replace the "umbrella valve" inside. Someone here on TU mentioned that small compressors also tend to pulse, which is not good for paint control. They will also shake the table if you sit them on it. Instead of repairing it again, I bought a small tool compressor with a 3 gal tank, to sit under my workbench. Much louder but it cannot be heard inside the house from the garage. It will turn on every 10-15 mins during a painting session. Next time around, I'll buy one with a larger tank rather than go back to an airbrush compressor. As well as running less often, a larger tank also allows you to use the compressor for more non-airbrush related tasks that demand greater cu ft/min.

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mholden    0

Thank you all so much for the quick replies! I really wasn't expecting same-day responses, and really appreciate you all sharing your experiences!

Since all three of you so far mention that your tool compressors aren't really a noise issue in the house, can I ask whether you have built a sound box for them? I was already thinking of doing something like this...

And thank you all once again!

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BobP    832

No, I didn't build a box. It sits in the garage, it's pretty loud, but no problem inside the house. Besides, I'd be worried about motor cooling inside a box.

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I paint downstairs and my air compressor is about 30 feet from me. I just turn mine on and go upstairs for about 10 minutes until it is done filling and then shut it off when I go back down. The bigger the better I could probably spray for 3 to 4 hours without running out of air. No need for a sound box and you would have to put a fan in it to keep the motor cool if it turned on all the time.

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hazmail    140

I would have both, BUT I just gave away a new cheap diaphragm type compressor because it sounded like a helicopter taking off.

Compressors made from old refrigerator compressors are very quiet, slow if you want to spray a car, but good for an airbrush.

All you need to know:

http://www.instructa...ompressors-101/

Or make your own

or for airbrush:

and while you are at it , here is a cheap air brush.

http://www.instructa...-super-precise/

I have used one of these for about 25 years, just hook it up to an air tank, on the noisy side but fast for its size :

http://www.instructa...from-Car-Parts/

Pete

Edited by hazmail

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Richard Prager    170

I have the one from Harbor Freights. I have had two go out on me. One was after 4 months and the other after a couple of weeks. They exchanged both of them. I am not surprised because they get used about 2-3 hours every day and they are made in China. I said when i first started using it, if it went out i would get another. I like it that much.

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Big Bass Man    88

I have a 15 gal with 120 psi. I can let it fill up to 120 psi and paint all evening and night with the one fill up.If you have room for the larger compressor, they are a bonus, but if not the smaller ones get the job done.

Patrick

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RayburnGuy    1,338

If your only going to buy one compressor I'd go with the tool type. That way you can use it for airing up tires, running a nail gun, etc. Just make sure to find out whether or not it is an oiled or oil less compressor. If it's an oiled type you will need to install a desiccant filter somewhere in your air supply before it gets to your airbrush. This will remove any oil vapors that might slip pass the compressors piston rings. Oiled compressors usually last longer than oil less compressors, but they generally make more noise than an oil less, but not any more than a normal tool compressor like those at most home improvement stores.

Ben

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mark poulson    1,700

If you're trying to shield the house from the compressor noise, I would just insulate the corner or area that you're putting the compressor into with fiberglass batt insulation, or line the wall with the soft sheet material that's used for message boards.

You can also add another layer of drwall, and even use a J channel sound isolater to mount it.

Go to a real builders supply, not home depot, and ask them about sound isolation systems.

I wouldn't put the compressor in a box.

Building a box for the compressor will reduce the amount of air that it can get for both painting and cooling. The compressor builds up heat while it's cycling, and needs air to cool it. Otherwise, you'll shorten it's life.

My compressor is in a corner, under a work bench, with enough room to get it out if I need to.

The walls of my garage are plastered, for fire, since it is attached, and the noise has never been an issue.

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benton B    18

I have a 20gal tool compressor and once it's full then I shut it off and paint. I can paint 15-20 baits of 20gal of air. should have bought the 30gal tank but hind sight don't help till later.

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mark poulson    1,700

I have a 20gal tool compressor and once it's full then I shut it off and paint. I can paint 15-20 baits of 20gal of air. should have bought the 30gal tank but hind sight don't help till later.

:lol::lol::lol:

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