Juice780

Flourescent Green Problem

11 posts in this topic

I'm getting better at my painting but I'm having trouble spraying fluorescent green for some reason. I'm using createx paint and my green wants to run on me almost like its too thin but I'm not thinning any. Anybody have any tips on how to get a clean look with fluorescent green. When it dries it looks alittle too light for my liking and if I spray too much it runs maybe I can add just a little regular green and it will do better.

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The fluorescent paints I've used do seem quite a bit thinner than even the paints I've thinned. You just need to spray light, multiple coats, with heat setting in between each coat, until you get the depth of color your after. Trying to spray one heavy coat to get the shade your looking for will give you the running problem your having.

Ben

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I spray 2 coats of white for a base. Spraying multiple light coats would probably be better but what do you do when your spraying scales or using a stencil where you can only spray 1 coat. Would the createx auto air be any better and can I spray regular createx and auto air on the same bait and not have any problems?

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Why can't you spray more than one coat when doing scales or using stencils? I do it all the time. I contacted the folks at Createx (they're both made by the same company) and they told me that auto air and createx have no incompatibility issues. I've even mixed the two together when making custom colors with no problems.

Ben

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If I remember right Createx and Auto-air are water bourne type paints. That is they can be thinned with water not hydrocarbon based thinners. Createx is used by T-shirt painting guys and heat set. Auto-air is made for painting metallic surfaces. But for painting lure either will work. Whats good about either one is they can be covered with E-tex or Devcon when the paint is heat set.

Createx comes in opaque, transparent and pearlized. Opaque has more pigment and therefore covers more. Transparent has less pigment so the paint or color underneath shows through. The auto and motorcycle custom painters use both opague and transparent to get color blends and shades to get those wild fires, ghost, and skull finishes . Pearlized has the pearl already mixed in. I took an beginners airbrush class and the instructor emphasized over and over - it easier to add paint than to remove it so blow on a light coat, dry it and blow on another coat if you want the tone to be darker. It really doesn't take very much time to heat set a coat on a lure before adding a second or third coat with the Createx or Auto-air. Just don't overheat with the heat set. I use a small hand held heater I got from an electronics store to shrink that heatshrink tubing on wiring. A hair dryer would work. Just don't use the war department's hairdryer without permission. It just might mess up your lure painting. Guys who have airbrushed for a while have learned thru experience how much to thin, how far away to hold the airbrush, needle sizes and air pressures to get the paint jobs mastered. I'm still learning.

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I'm gonna buy some autoair and try it out. The way I do my scales would be a pain to put 2 coats on but I'm gonna get me some different material, the stuff I'm using is too stiff.

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one thing ive found helps is add a drop or two of opaque yellow or green when spraying floro yellow to get the right shade/consistency im after and also thinning with wicked reducer as well instead of water helps tremendously too in my opinion - as far as scale material i found veil material from hobby lobby works very well and is cheap ($1.39/sq yd) - i just cut a 4-5" square at a time and reuse it again after it dries a day or so - ive also noticed that if you heat set between coats and slowly build it up, it can make a 3D effect in the scaling as well - it took some practice but it can be done - just be sure to heat set between coats and do a final heat set really well - other wise i have had trouble with taking a section of paint up when pulling off the veil material - peeling slowly from one direction seems to work best for me

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one thing ive found helps is add a drop or two of opaque yellow or green when spraying floro yellow to get the right shade/consistency im after and also thinning with wicked reducer as well instead of water helps tremendously too in my opinion - as far as scale material i found veil material from hobby lobby works very well and is cheap ($1.39/sq yd) - i just cut a 4-5" square at a time and reuse it again after it dries a day or so - ive also noticed that if you heat set between coats and slowly build it up, it can make a 3D effect in the scaling as well - it took some practice but it can be done - just be sure to heat set between coats and do a final heat set really well - other wise i have had trouble with taking a section of paint up when pulling off the veil material - peeling slowly from one direction seems to work best for me

Heat setting between coats is gluing the paint on the mesh to the body of the bait thus the reason it peels. Heat after you remove the mesh. The 3D effect is caused by spraying the paint from one direction only. For instance you can spray gold from the tail forward on a 45 degree angle. Turn the bait around and spray copper or maybe silver from the nose back. Naturally more paint will gather at the back corners of the mesh from the direction your spraying. Never spray scales straight on. When the mesh is removed it appears as raised scales. Once you get it down you can play with thinned transparents over the pearl. It may look like a blue pearl paint was used but really it is a silver pearl with blue transparent. No heat, no tricks, no special paint, just one paint over another.

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Heat setting between coats is gluing the paint on the mesh to the body of the bait thus the reason it peels. Heat after you remove the mesh. The 3D effect is caused by spraying the paint from one direction only. For instance you can spray gold from the tail forward on a 45 degree angle. Turn the bait around and spray copper or maybe silver from the nose back. Naturally more paint will gather at the back corners of the mesh from the direction your spraying. Never spray scales straight on. When the mesh is removed it appears as raised scales. Once you get it down you can play with thinned transparents over the pearl. It may look like a blue pearl paint was used but really it is a silver pearl with blue transparent. No heat, no tricks, no special paint, just one paint over another.

Gunnie....would you mind sharing more about this topic......thanks

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What part, the heat, scales, transparents, etc?? I got a little of topic......LOL I assume you want the scale and transparent info.

Think about it this way; build a square box or round or diamond, doesn't really matter the shape or how big/small. Now spray paint at a 45 degree angle and see what happens. The back of the box will receive more paint than the front of the box because more air is hitting the back of the box thus carrying more paint. Naturally the back of the box will be darker than the front. Now turn the box around and shoot a different colored paint from the opposite direction. Use a paint similar in color like gold/copper, red/deep red, silver/gold works good for fish scales.

What would happen if you spray the box at 90 degrees or straight on. It would all be the same color, right? This is what you don't want thus the reason I said never spray scales straight on even if your only using one color.

Basically what I'm saying is you have two different colored paints in the same box with one side being slightly darker than the other. So what your doing is shadowing or making it look like its raised off the surface. Now think of your netting material as a whole bunch of tiny boxes stacked side by side.

If your using pearls to shadow your "boxes" you can take a transparent thin it down a little and spray over the pearl at a 45 degree angle from ONE direction only. I stress one direction only with transparents over pearl and one direction only if using a single color. Nobody and I repeat Nobody can do detail work on a bait using Createx pearls. They are layering a paint with a combo of pearls and transparents and/or using shimmers. Dont be fooled by the sales pitch.....

This is a lot of extra steps but if you want to paint baits like the top dawgs on Ebay then you must do the work. The biggest mistake people make is they think a simple shad pattern is 6-8 steps when it is more like 20. Its actually kind of a stupid hobby if ya look at it from a square inch point of view.

I will probably get kicked out of the painters union for this but that super fine sparkly glitter looking stuff a lot of these painters use is called prizmatic. I'm not sure if I spelled it right but it is an automotive glitter coat. It can be sprayed through a brush with a .5mm tip but a touch up gun works better. Available at any auto paint store but it is about $90 a quart. It is super cool stuff.....

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