A-Mac

Band Saw Blades

8 posts in this topic

Hey guys,

I was wondering what type of bandsaw blades you use. I'm currently using a 1/8" thick blade (think its 16 teeth per inch) and am using it on a small bandsaw. This works fine for balsa lures ; however, these blades dull quickly. Is there a particular brand anyone is really happy with?

Also, and most importantly, what type of blade do you use to cut out the micarta, g10, fiberglass, etc. style blades. I tend to just use my dull blades to cut this, because it will eat them in a hurry.

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I replaced the stock blades on my benchtop band saw with Bosch 1/8 inch 15 TPI blades from Lowe's. I cut balsa, basswood, pine and paulownia with mine and the blade seems to be holding up pretty well. I feed the wood into the blade slowly and give the blade time to do it's job.

The job of cutting micarta is left up to a diamond impregnated cutoff wheel attached to the Dremel. Any fine tuning to the cut is either done with the small drum sander attachment for the Dremel or a sanding block.

If you want to try the diamond cutoff wheels they can be found at hobby shops that carry Dremel accessories. Or you can give me a holler and I will look up the web address where I get mine.

Ben

Edited by RayburnGuy

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I use a pair of Wiss tin snips to rough cut both polycarbonate and circuit board lips. The snips work fast to cut a line slightly outside the lip template lines, then finish the lip with a Dremel sanding cylinder and a Dremel felt polishing cylinder to buff the edges of polycarbonate lips. Perhaps a band saw will work just as fast and some guys like to stack sheets of lip stock so they can cut multiple lips with a band saw at one time. I use a less powerful scroll saw to cut my wood bait blanks and it really isn't very good at cutting lip material, so the tin snips are a good compromise that does the job pretty quickly and neatly.

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haven't tried the tin snips. Might have to look into it if nobody pops up with any other ideas.

RayburnGuy, I agree with you. The blade you mentioned from Lowes (Bosch) seem to hold up better than any other brand I've played with from the big box stores.

http://www.toolcenter.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=LENOXBC

anyone used a carbide grit blade like this?

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Never tried the carbide grit blade. If you decide to try one let us know how it works out.

Ben

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For polycarbonate, fiberglass etc, I switch to a metal blade on my band saw. I think it is 24 teeth per inch.

Dave

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Depending on the thickness of the material (stainless steel,aluminium or poly from an old face shields) and style of the bib, try cutting with old paper guillotine, clamp and cut.

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I use a pair of Wiss tin snips to rough cut both polycarbonate and circuit board lips. The snips work fast to cut a line slightly outside the lip template lines, then finish the lip with a Dremel sanding cylinder and a Dremel felt polishing cylinder to buff the edges of polycarbonate lips. Perhaps a band saw will work just as fast and some guys like to stack sheets of lip stock so they can cut multiple lips with a band saw at one time. I use a less powerful scroll saw to cut my wood bait blanks and it really isn't very good at cutting lip material, so the tin snips are a good compromise that does the job pretty quickly and neatly.

Thanks man... Wiss tin snips are the only way to go! Very little dust, no waste, and nice straight cuts.

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