RayburnGuy

Variable Speed Drive Motor For Lure Turner?

16 posts in this topic

Has anyone ever tried using a motor from a sewing machine to power a lure turner? Not sure about the newer models, but the older machines were setup with a foot pedal that allowed for variable speed. These motors seem like they would have plenty of power to do the job and I'm thinking it wouldn't be much of a stretch to convert the foot pedal over to a variable speed switch. And if you didn't want to spend the money on a switch you could build some sort of clamping device to hold the pedal in position with an adjustable screw to press down on the pedal thus maintaining a set speed.

Just thinking out loud here guys. I've already got a lure turner, but always trying to think of ways to make things better or easier. Would like to hear your thoughts about this.

Ben

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Since I only make 2-6 baits at a time I made a device to use a variable speed drill for a lure turner. :) I might try your idea, im sure I could find a cheap old sewing machine somewhere.

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Dang it Ben, doesn't your tinker thinker ever rest? Danged good idea! Be hell to get the lures all loaded and slip on the pedal though... Could you imagine instead of spinning at 4 rpm's, the turner spinning at 400? I have about the same mental picture as when someone on here blew/spit on his molten lead that was on fire... That would be another "Harry and Charlie" moment!

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Dang it Ben, doesn't your tinker thinker ever rest? Danged good idea! Be hell to get the lures all loaded and slip on the pedal though... Could you imagine instead of spinning at 4 rpm's, the turner spinning at 400? I have about the same mental picture as when someone on here blew/spit on his molten lead that was on fire... That would be another "Harry and Charlie" moment!

My "tinker thinker" never sleeps. I wake up in the middle of the night thinking about these things. :?

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I also tinker around with building fishing rods. I made a power wrapper using a sewing machine type motor with foot pedal speed controller. Some things to consider: The motor I used is an AC/DC type motor bought from Granger. (foot controller too). The motor will turn out some RPM so some way to gear or belt drive a dryer shaft will be necessary (unless you want to sling off some finish). Take a look a power rod wrappers on internet and you will see they all have belt drives to a rod turning chuck. My rod turner is direct drive and I have to barely press on the controller to get a slow speed. Also the foot controller heats up some. I would worry about continuous use while lure finish cures. I have a separate 18 RPM rod turner to rotate the rod for wrap curing process. That motor is a small geared motor.

Not saying it cant be done but some things to consider. So if anybody like to tinker - go for it and show some picks. The main problem for me is budget. I got a lot of scrap in the 'not so good of idea after all' pile.

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It getting hot at slow speeds was one of my concerns. Not knowing much about electricity I had to ask though.

Ben

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Just wondering out loud here, but what would be the benefit of a variable speed turner? I would think the topcoat would just sling off if you went much more than 8 rpm. Rayburnguy, I'm not saying your coocoo or anything like that, I am just curious if someguys use high rpm turners. Mine goes really slow. Rob

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Just wondering out loud here, but what would be the benefit of a variable speed turner? I would think the topcoat would just sling off if you went much more than 8 rpm. Rayburnguy, I'm not saying your coocoo or anything like that, I am just curious if someguys use high rpm turners. Mine goes really slow. Rob

The variable speed was not really what I was concerned about. I was looking at the strength of the motor as there are some guys who want to turn multiple large or heavy baits and something like a microwave motor or a rotisserie motor won't hold up for the lures they make. The only reason for the variable speed on the sewing machine motor was to slow it down enough to where it wouldn't spin so fast it did what you described.

Ben

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I was looking at the strength of the motor as there are some guys who want to turn multiple large or heavy baits and something like a microwave motor or a rotisserie motor won't hold up for the lures they make.

Ben

Who are making lures that would not hold up to a rotisserie motor? I think the cheapest rotisserie motors are made for 25 lbs and they go up to hog size. I would think a sewing machine motor to be poor substitue as function quite different. While I like to tinker as much as the next guy seems like this one wouldn't be something i would persue.

Now have you seen the sewingmachine motor conversion to mini lathe... :?

Edited by Travis

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Who are making lures that would not hold up to a rotisserie motor? I think the cheapest rotisserie motors are made for 25 lbs and they go up to hog size. I would think a sewing machine motor to be poor substitue as function quite different. While I like to tinker as much as the next guy seems like this one wouldn't be something i would persue.

There was a post in wire baits the other day where a guy was building heavy jugs and said the load he would be turning would be in the neighborhood of 30 lbs. While there are some folks to whom money is of no concern and can afford to spend whatever it takes to get what they want or need there are others of us who have not been so blessed. I opened this discussion in the hope that something suitable could be built to turn a heavily loaded drying wheel from scrap parts that could be found for a few bucks. This is not something I myself am trying to build. The post was made more for discussion purposes. As I stated in my first post I already have a lure turner that works quite well. I have a very limited knowledge of electric motors, switches, rheostats, etc. and this is why I posted the thread. I merely thought this could possibly be another way of building a lure turner if the electronics could be worked out.

Edited by RayburnGuy

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:lolhuh:

Ok my post addressed the weight issue. A rotessiere motor in function should be superior to a sewing machine motor. I used cheap not as in price but more about entry level in performance with respect to weight. My point is that if one had neither in the stock pile of crap we all have that they would be better served finding a rotessiere motor to tinker with for a lure turner.

I am sure it could be done just not for sure the end product would compare favorably to the rotesserie motor.

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As long as you keep the wheel balanced the weight should not matter much. Only to get started spinning. I modified a Rod finishing motor to power mine.

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Just wondering out loud here, but what would be the benefit of a variable speed turner? I would think the topcoat would just sling off if you went much more than 8 rpm. Rayburnguy, I'm not saying your coocoo or anything like that, I am just curious if someguys use high rpm turners. Mine goes really slow. Rob

How slow? I'm looking at building a turner. Is 2 rpm too slow?

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My turner spins at 4 rpm and has served all my needs with no problems. Anywhere between 2 to 10 rpm seems to be the consensus from all the posts I've read on the subject.

Ben

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I'm going to build one with a rotisserie motor I got from a friend. Not sure what the speed is, but it isn't much.

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